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Another Negative Homeschool Article


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This article, titled Parents Must Consider Disadvantages Before Homeschooling, was published this week in a local newpaper, one that is published in our state capital. Please help respond to this article and show the readers how completely off the author is. Some of his statements include:

 

Parents do not take into consideration the irreversible injustice they can place upon their children.

 

Some of the most significant disadvantages to home schooling are cost, time, parents’ inability to instruct, lack of contact with other children (learning how to socialize), interpersonal skills, communication skills and being overprotected from the real world.

 

It has been my finding that a large number of parents are not equipped to be home school instructors. Many parents don’t have any formal training, lack discipline, or lack organization skills

 

The biggest disadvantage to home schooling is the child’s lack of socialization which does not provide them the opportunity to interact with other children.

 

There is research that states that the self-esteem and confidence of children who have been home schooled is sometimes lower than those in public school.
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Parents do not take into consideration the considerable injustice of placing their children in a failing school.

 

Some of the most significant disadvantages to public schooling are the high costs to our tax payers, the inefficient use of time, some teacher's inability to instruct, lack of contact with people of all ages (lack of socialization in greater society), interpersonal skills mostly learned from peers instead of adults, communication skills, and being taken out of the real world.

 

It has been my finding that a large number of teachers are not equipped to teach the subjects necessary. Many teachers spend most of their time managing classroom behavior and teaching to the test.

 

The biggest disadvantage to public schooling is that having a "one size fits all" classroom leaves the brightest often bored and the slowest relegated to special education.

 

There is research that the bullying and impersonality of a classroom has led some students to school violence.

 

*Yes - I know that these are gross generalizations about public schooling but then so is the article.

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What a valuable piece of work! I confess, I am a dumb @rse who plucks ideas out of the sky to inflict on my nearest and dearest without actually thinking through the consequences. Mr 'Oosiwhatsits has saved me from ruining my children's lives!

 

Bah humbug.

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What a valuable piece of work! I confess, I am a dumb @rse who plucks ideas out of the sky to inflict on my nearest and dearest without actually thinking through the consequences. Mr 'Oosiwhatsits has saved me from ruining my children's lives!

 

Bah humbug.

 

 

You tell him, Scrooge!! ;) :D:tongue_smilie:

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I read it - and didn't read anything new or exciting... He says he knows 5 people that were homeschooled. One has to wonder how many he's had interactions with that he didn't know about... and, of course, I think most of us can point to at least 5 people who were public schooled who could fit his "issues."

 

Interestingly enough, employers I've talked with prefer homeschool graduates... and the couple of colleges we've visited so far haven't had an issue with it either. Perhaps he needs to widen his circle of acquaintances?

 

Considering that homeschooling numbers have been on the rise - and as per the last articles I recall reading on the subject, it's mainly from the wealthy and well-educated - his opinions certainly are on the wane.

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Woosh. I'm so concerned about the opinions of a "fitness professional" on my educational choices.

 

:iagree:

 

That cracked me up. A poorly written article that fails to site any research doesn't really concern me.

 

The general mindset in the press of attacking homeschooling as a general rule is infuriating.

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It has been my finding that a large number of parents are not equipped to be home school instructors. Many parents don’t have any formal training, lack discipline, or lack organization skills

 

I hate to admit that I agree with this one (althought I think it should read "desire to learn" as opposed to "formal training,") but the rest are false.

 

This reminds me of the NEA's negative homeschool article written by a janitor. ;)

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According to the professionals I interviewed, it is easy to identify those individuals who have been in a home school environment.

 

 

He never says how they know these kids have been in a home school environment. This could be a good thing. I think there are many good things that come from being in a home school environment.

 

 

Often, one of the parents must give up his or her job to home school. The loss of a second income in a two-income household can be detrimental. This can be a significant disadvantage and it can disrupt the harmony of the home.

 

 

This is our choice. If it is planned out and the desire of the family then the loss of an income is not detrimental.

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"There is research that states that the self-esteem and confidence of children who have been home schooled is sometimes lower than those in public school."

 

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

 

I just woke up and didn't read the article yet but the only thing I can do is laugh at this quote. I was in public school for 13 years, got bullied, was shy, and walked out with ZERO self-esteem. It took me years to deal with it.

 

My ds is a delayed reader, a tad quirky, and small for his age. I have no doubt somewhere along in his schooling he would have been picked on because of at least one of these things. BECAUSE we homeschool he understands that he is a unique person and has strong self-esteem and confidence in himself.

 

 

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"There is research that states that the self-esteem and confidence of children who have been home schooled is sometimes lower than those in public school."

 

 

 

I love the word SOMETIMES. I guess since the confidence and self-esteem is not ALWAYS higher, then we home schoolers must be doing something wrong. Hello?

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Okay, I read the article. Ten pages of comments, wow! The all-important guidance counselor hit me. Granted I was in high school back in the stone age (80s or was that the metal age?) and I met my guidance counselor ONCE to transfer a class. They provided no service to me at all.

 

I probably would have attempted college if someone had been "guiding" me in that direction. My parents didn't know how to help and again as a shy child with no self-esteem I didn't know where to turn for the information. All I would have needed was a prodding. I feel like the public school failed me on so many counts (that's a whole other therapy session).

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The guidance counselor at my hs was a drunk. It was funny and a little sad, sitting in her office while she slurred her way through your future.

 

The one at the other ps hs (where dh went), told all the girls to find a good man and settle down (it was the 90s) and the boys should join the military or go to Votech....

 

Yeah, I might find some hobo in Richmond or DC and bring my kids to them every once in awhile, it will be a fair trade.

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The fact is that many, many homeschool parents do not realize the timing and the scope of the guidance counselor task until it is too late. We made that mistake with our oldest but God managed to work things out for us. With DS16, MomsintheGarden is on top of things! (Determination? Yeah, she's like a pit bull on the end of a dead man's leg! :D )

 

Anyway, we've observed too many HS families that have missed important opportunities by not properly handling this important task.

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"Robert Mitchell, a 12-year fitness professional and owner of Lacey Adventure Boot Camp, is a member of The Olympian’s Diversity Panel."

 

Is the purpose of the Diversity Panel to encourage uniformity and discourage alternative approaches or points of view?

 

Hmmm....

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My dh's guidance counselor told him he wasn't college material. My dh now has a master's degree (thanks to his parents, who told him he was college material). I used to go to my guidance counselor to get out of class. She didn't care and we would just sit and chat about anything because she liked me. I didn't need guidance, just a get out of class free pass.

Real big help, huh?

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What I reject is the author's "global application" to ALL homeschoolers of the cited "disadvantages".

 

Take a moment to be fair, though. Bluntly speaking, there are many, many homeschooling families which include one or more of the listed "disadvantages." The world of homeschooling is not some Utopia, free from problems. Some families should not be homeschooling, yet won't admit it. Some families have one or more specific, serious problems, yet "re-label" them with a vague, benign explanation.

 

If I were rebutting the author, I would attack the simplistic, knee-jerk assumption that all homeschooling families are alike. I then would take the "disadvantages", one-by-one, and cite specific measures taken by homeschooling families to ensure that the "disadvantage" is not present for the family. Others of the "disadvantages" reflect differing pedagogy.

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I've been looking for a good logic curriculum to use with my dss this year and I think this fits the bill perfectly. He is completely lacking fact in his argument and it has so many holes in it you could drive a Mack Truck through it.

 

Do not even get me started on the inabilities of ps teachers, no matter what their training or intent, to guide children or or their parents that do not want to be lead or learn. Perhaps I should comment to him about the principal at youngest ds school threatening to call in the sheriffs dept. at his 5th grade graduation the other night because the parents were behaving so badly. Of course the behavior of the parents cleared up any uncertainty I had about their dcc behavior.

 

Certainly this man is entitled to his opinion, but that is all he stated, his opinion. Not to mention my 12 yo could write a better article.

 

This man is an idiot!!

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As the wife of a former youth minister, having served in churches with lots of HSers and PSers of all ages - I completely LAUGHED OUT LOUD!!!!!!

 

I would love to write an article about the 6ft tall High School (PUBLIC SCHOOL) Junior who was deathly afraid to ask me (the 5 ft tall y.minister's wife:tongue_smilie:) to GO TO THE BATHROOM!!!!!!! It's funny - but really sad - I can tell without asking, just by the way he interacted with me, that he was used to being *subordinate* to female authority in an unhealthy manner......afraid to ask to pee!!!!!!! Let's all applaud those social skills:glare:.....and pray for that kid b/c I dread to think of how he will manage in a world of jobs and bosses.:confused:

 

I've met HSers who don't fit into the PS crowd - true, and often it's to their benefit tbh! I've seen the good, bad and ugly.....church youth group is like the *show and tell* of how well kids are "socialized!" I've never met a HSer afraid to ask to use the restroom....

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The article is laced with opinions and judgements. The writer of the article gives no true facts to support his claims, just what he observed. Has he done any studies? Has he read any reports of studies? Just an opinion lined article! This article was written by a fitness instructor. It seems as if the more I read it the more I had to laugh. This article is invalid because it has nothing to support its claims and is written by no expert in the field.

 

Here is an example of what I mean:

 

According to the professionals I interviewed, it is easy to identify those individuals who have been in a home school environment.

 

The above statement is straight from the article. He makes this claim and provides no evidence to support the statement.

 

Any lunatic can write an article about anything they want. I guess it is my choice whether to listen. The sad thing is that you even have professionals who are clueless writing these articles and trying to make laws about it.

 

Blessings,

Karen

http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

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I agree with Orthodox6. I cringe when I read some homeschoolers responses whenever one of these "negative" articles surface. No choice, is free of pros and cons, but some homeschoolers seem to reject all criticism, even constructive. I'd much rather acknowlege and address the disadvantages and weaknesses in an unapologetic manner. That seems to be the more credible choice in my book.

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I don't read these articles.

 

I know that homeschooling works for us and that my girl is pretty well adjusted and getting a decent education. It may not be for everyone, but it works for us.

 

There will always be 2 camps of thought on homeschooling. There are 2 camps of thought on just about every topic under the sun, so why should homeschooling be any different.

 

Peace,

Kim

 

This article, titled Parents Must Consider Disadvantages Before Homeschooling, was published this week in a local newpaper, one that is published in our state capital. Please help respond to this article and show the readers how completely off the author is. Some of his statements include:
Edited by titianmom
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What a poorly written article. I didn't have time to read all the comments. I read a lot of the comments on the Jesse Scacia article and was saddened that many who wrote in support of homeschooling (hsing teachers) didn't take the time to make sure their comments were free of spelling and grammatical errors. Please, if you're writing to defend homeschooling please take the extra steps to make sure you don't have errors like that!!! :confused:

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okay, COST? Are they serious?

 

Our public & private school students are given a list at the beginning of the year for supplies "for the teacher & classroom".... antibacterial gel, crayons, tissue, paper towels, clorox wipes, baby wipes, on & on.... they are even asked to buy specific brand name products in specific sizes in order to not offend or alienate another child.

 

They also pay fees for labs, music classes/trips, and ALL FIELD TRIPS. I do not know of a single school that does FREE field trips... if they do any at all. Most, around here, may do ONE trip and parents do pay!

 

I don't have to pay the school, buy supplies for OTHERs, and we do not need back to school clothes, special backpacks, trendy supplies and other unneccesary accessories.

 

That argument is irrelevant. Off to read the rest....

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okay, round 2....

It becomes even more challenging when parents try to balance everyday chores with home schooling.

 

Just like teachers, parents need time to prepare lessons, plan activities, organize and keep the children on task. They must also learn how to balance their time while still being able to maintain the home

 

 

What if I had a 40-50 hour per week job? How can I balance that with homework, laundry and all those chores?

 

What is the difference in work & homeschooling in regards to time management?

 

Another foolish argument or one sided research....

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Most of the time, there is not a set routine. In public school, children must report to school at a certain time and their day is mapped out. They are held accountable for their actions.

 

 

No set routine.... it can get chaotic, but there is routine. No bells ring to make us end a history lesson if we are really learning & loving it. Perhaps math is 15 minutes late... but we still have math... just have to finish the History lesson first. No homework here.

 

If you are truly not doing the job in homeschooling.... you would also not be doing the job as a parent supporting the homework & lessons sent home from the school. Hours of homework must be done by many students & uninterested parents have failing kids in the schools. Go figure.... that doesn't matter b/c atleast those tax dollars are rolling in.

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What I reject is the author's "global application" to ALL homeschoolers of the cited "disadvantages".

 

Take a moment to be fair, though. Bluntly speaking, there are many, many homeschooling families which include one or more of the listed "disadvantages." The world of homeschooling is not some Utopia, free from problems. Some families should not be homeschooling, yet won't admit it. Some families have one or more specific, serious problems, yet "re-label" them with a vague, benign explanation.

 

If I were rebutting the author, I would attack the simplistic, knee-jerk assumption that all homeschooling families are alike. I then would take the "disadvantages", one-by-one, and cite specific measures taken by homeschooling families to ensure that the "disadvantage" is not present for the family. Others of the "disadvantages" reflect differing pedagogy.

 

I think this is a very important point. He should have written the article in a cautionary voice, one that encourages people to research this endeavor rather than 'jump on the homeschooling bandwagon'.

 

Ten plus pages of comments on the article is a lot to wade through. Has anybody actually written a concise, articulate, logical, diplomatic, well-researched rebuttal? I'd love to read it!

 

[Note: I don't feel qualified to be the one to write it since I haven't 'officially' started homeschooling my kids yet (eldest is 4) and consequently don't have the voice of experience necessary to sound truly convincing.] :)

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Here is an example of what I mean:

 

According to the professionals I interviewed, it is easy to identify those individuals who have been in a home school environment.

 

The above statement is straight from the article. He makes this claim and provides no evidence to support the statement.

 

When I read that statement, I wondered if he had deliberately left the supporting examples out because they interfered with his preconceived notions and contradicted his intended slant for the article.

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In the past few weeks I've read posts on this board that link to articles which are hostile to homeschooling. All the articles linked have a reactionary tone and clearly do not demonstrate the author's ability to substantiate his or her argument with verifiable fact, rather the writers rely on anecdotal evidence for support. It seems these writers feel threatened by the power of parents to choose. It is so much easier to sling mud than to unearth facts. While it maybe true some home school students would benefit from a public school education, the same could be said that many public school student would benefit from home schooling. What is left unsaid is why parents~ rich, poor, of all ethnic and religious backgrounds are rejecting American public education. If American public education worked, then people might not feel the need to home school or send their children to private school.

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There are outstanding homeschooling families. There are outstanding public school teachers. There are some families that plain and simple should not be homeschooling and are doing a major disservice to their kids. There are some (perhaps many) teachers who are a true danger to kids. Homeschooling is not a panacea though. It is a job and not an easy job.

 

We do have to consider finances and be willing to make sacrifices to homeschool effectively. It doesn't mean that there not ways to lower the costs of homeschooling, or ways to cut budget so that one parent can stay home or ways to schedule so that both parents can work, that public school doesn't have costs, that homeschooling is still cheaper than private schooling, etc. Still finances are something to be considered because like it or not, money is one of the major causese of marriage problems.

 

We do have to consider our organizational capabilities and willingness to take homeschooling seriously. I think most formal training is unnecessary but we can not pretend that those who just don't have the self-discpline to do what it takes don't exist or the pretend that that the mere act of becoming a homeschooler is going to turn you into an organized super mom.

 

We do have to consider socialization needs -some areas it is very easy to homeschool and some areas of the country it is still an isolating choice. I am lucky that we have lots of socialization opportunties and I feel that the government school socialization is especially dangerous in my area but I have met some homeschool kids that are not well socialized. I think homeschooling helps most kids socially but it's not a cure-all.

 

Homeschooling is draining. My kids are great kids, advanced learners, usually self-motivated, mostly well-behaved, and just plain cute as can be. Our methods are fun and exciting for most part. But I still have occasional days that I think I am going to lose my mind. It's hard to get "me" time -don't even have that commute time. Some people have differing abilities to be around children than others. It is something to consider. We are on summer break and I am planning next year's lessons, trying to read upteen gazillion reviews on Latin and Spanish curriculums so I can make a wise decision, trying to find ways to coordinate the completely different learning styles of my children, etc.

 

I find it harder to keep the house going while homeschooling than I did working a full time job. For one thing, we are home all day living in it and then homeschooling itself takes up a lot of room, especially when you are not fortunate enough to have a dedicated homeschooling room! It's easier to pick up groceries on way home from work while you are already out and childless than it is to load everyone up, make a special drive to the store, and listen to a litany of "I want..." and "Can I have?" or "It's my turn to push the cart." I've been trying to fit in buying a new bra for months. When I was a working mom, I would done the shopping on my lunch break. Now I don't get one.

 

These are all things that need to be considered. It doesn't mean they can't be worked through but they still need to be considered. Homeschooling is not a one-size fits all solution. I think that is really the gist of what this guy was trying to say. It is great for some but not for others and you need to think about it before you make a rash decision. The fact that a homeschooler won the spelling bee doesn't mean that your child is going to win spelling bees just because you are haphazardly homeschooling.

 

On the other hand, I think the author of this article did a poor job of citing the source of his research. The alleged self-esteem issues is new one on me. My experience reveals the opposite lol. I have also never seen a guidance counselor do anything. At my school they were there to pick up forms from but didn't do much else. Our guidance counselor was married to our football coach and had been his student lol. I am sure that a really good guidance counselor exists somewhere. Don't want to stereotype them lol.

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What a poorly written article. I didn't have time to read all the comments. I read a lot of the comments on the Jesse Scacia article and was saddened that many who wrote in support of homeschooling (hsing teachers) didn't take the time to make sure their comments were free of spelling and grammatical errors. Please, if you're writing to defend homeschooling please take the extra steps to make sure you don't have errors like that!!! :confused:

 

Tell me about it!

 

If I see "grammer" one more time, I think I will go mad. "A" and "E" aren't even typed with the same finger.

 

 

a

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I've seen a lot of people judging the "fitness" of other people to home school. These people from outside of homeschooling are usually just ignorant. They attack because home schoolers make them feel insecure about their own life choices, or they simply fear anyone different from themselves. There's nothing new about their behavior; they're just being human.

 

Home school parents who act as judges of other home school families should know better. I've been guilty of this too, but I'm working on it. Here's an example:

 

Most of our home schooling acquaintances simply don't put in the same amount of time we do. Some of them put in very little time. For a while I was privately critical of this. Then I got my reality check. These mothers are simply more efficient than I am, and their kids work faster. I'm still jealous of all the free time they have, but now I know that I'm the one with the problem, not them.

 

There's a very holier than thou Bible-thumping homeschooling mother in our community who alternately shuns me and attacks me whenever we meet. I have no idea what's going on between her ears, and I'm too busy to care. (That's not just a flippant remark. Seriously, I'm very, very busy.) She doesn't know me well at all, so her attacks are far off base. It's a shame she's so spiteful, because I've pretty much given up on going to any home school events where she's present. She sucks all the joy out of the room with her dour expression and judgmental remarks.

 

I'm so busy that wasting time on divisive, mean-spirited, unfairly judgmental people in or out of the home schooling community is simply not on the schedule. These people are infected with a dysfunctional way of looking at others that can be contagious, and I don't want to catch it.

 

The only reason any of them ever need to be rebutted is when their undisciplined slander threatens home schooling rights. Whether the target is an individual, or all of us in general, we need to be alert to the potential for real harm. Most of these loud mouths have no real power, but sometimes people who do have power are influenced by them.

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