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Guerber/Miller Histories question


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Guest 4boys

I'm not quite sure how to ask this but I'm giving it a shot because no matter how many online samples of these books I look at, I still don't quite know!

 

It says that these books contain a strong Christian worldview woven throughout the text. I want to know what that means exactly... these days the word Christian can mean many different things. I am a conservative, Bible-believing Christian (if that helps) and I suppose what I am wanting to know is if the Christian worldview in these books is solidly biblical. Does that make sense?

 

I already bought the Story of the Ancient World and I love how it looks as I've skimmed it but I haven't read it right through yet. Are the other books in the series similar to the Ancient World one? IOW, if I read the first one, will I have my answer?

 

I don't really want to spend the $30 on each book and then be stuck with something that isn't what I thought it was.

 

Any comments are appreciated. I hope this made sense. :D

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My df, who is a conservative, YE, Bible-believing Christian, LOVES the Miller/Gruebers. She used the one after ancients--I don't know what it's called--it's the one that combines the Story of Old France and the English one, I think. SHe's a lit major and knows good writing.

Does that help?

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Guest 4boys
My df, who is a conservative, YE, Bible-believing Christian, LOVES the Miller/Gruebers. She used the one after ancients--I don't know what it's called--it's the one that combines the Story of Old France and the English one, I think. SHe's a lit major and knows good writing.

Does that help?

 

That does help, thanks. This might be one of those times when I need to just spend the money and see for myself.

 

But any other opinions are welcome!

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It says that these books contain a strong Christian worldview woven throughout the text. I want to know what that means exactly... these days the word Christian can mean many different things. I am a conservative, Bible-believing Christian (if that helps) and I suppose what I am wanting to know is if the Christian worldview in these books is solidly biblical. Does that make sense?

 

I haven't read all of the books in the series yet, but I would say that they are solidly biblical. The Ancient World one is perhaps the best example because the author went through and corrected the original narrative any time it was in conflict with the Biblical text.

 

In the new 3rd edition of The Story of the Greeks that is coming out, the stated changes are: "The new edition will include all the text of Guerber's history, with additional chapters at the beginning of the book on the rise of the Greeks from Japheth and the Tower of Babel dispersion, and the mythology of the Greeks from a corruption of the true history of the world recorded in Genesis. The new edition will also conclude with additional chapters covering the important events which occurred in Palestine during the reign of Alexander's generals, before the occupation by the Romans, which fulfilled Biblical prophecy."

 

The current edition of The Story of the Romans is identically to the original with a few typos corrected. A more Biblical view of the earliest settlers can be found in the publisher's preface.

 

The Story of the Middle Ages has corrections to the origins of the different groups of people.

 

Timelines in all the books correspond to a young earth view and follow Ussher's chronology for their earliest dating. HTH

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Erin,

 

I used Story of the Thirteen Colonies and Story of the Great Republic. Because they aren't of Biblical times they probably could be used by someone from a secular point of view, because they only have occasional references. I think anything more though would feel forced. I really enjoyed them.

 

You probably can just take a look at the free online versions to get a feel for them. Christine Miller always details what she changes in the beginning of each book, so if you can across something you didn't like you could ask one of us if it has been changed.

 

Heather

 

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Erin, the books are not going to CONTRADICT anything you believe, but they do not go to lengths to communicate particular religious viewpoints or interpretations of the history either. So for instance in the american history books you'll have inclusion of america's religious history, exclusion of propoganda and pc spin, but you also won't have any particular additional religious commentary you might be looking for like a strongly providential viewpoint (like in America's Providential History or another such book that would have a lot of interpretation).

 

I think what you haven't asked here is the age-appropriateness, which came up in another thread recently. I have almost all the books, but they're really overkill for the ages of your dc (age 7 and under). I'd save your money and buy them later. The ancient history one is biblical history and more accessible, but even it would be better later, with a bit older kids.

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