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I was tutoring several homeschooled students in Algebra and teaching another flute lessons. I was very impressed by their moral, goals, etc and decided something very right is going on here. We decided to homeschool our son before he was even born, and we have always been happy with our decision.

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It has decimated our small local school district. Dd attended PS from kindergarten through April of her 2nd grade year, when we could take the relentless pursuit of mastery test scores no longer.

 

Science and Social studies were eliminated from the K-5 curriculum:eek: because "those subjects are not tested on the CT mastery test.*" That's right. ELIMINATED. Along with art, music and all classroom celebrations because those "frills" used up precious drill and skill time. Kindergarteners endured 2.5 hours of guided reading in the morning and 2 hours of math skills in the afternoon. That's it. Unbelievable, yes. But I was teaching in the district then (7th grade English) and I know firsthand. So the last person on earth I ever thought would homeschool, ME, found herself and her dh in the principal's office withdrawing dd. Incidentally, the principal, a father of preschoolers, asked what curriculum we were planning on using because he and his wife were planning on homeschooling their kids because of what NCLB had done to the schools.

 

Two minutes later our decision was validated yet again. As we left the principal's office that day we were met in the hallway by the reading specialist at the school, who was a close colleague of mine. She asked what we were doing there, and we said we were withdrawing Molly. "Oh!" she replied, a look of shock on her face. "We're really going to miss her scores. She did so well on the standardized tests that it helped boost the average scores quite a bit."

 

Um, yeah. Not that she'd miss MOLLY, or anything about her other than her mastery test scores. Nice.

 

Our town is no exception. NCLB has been so damaging to small, struggling school districts across the country. It's sad. But it's the honest answer to why we homeschool.

 

*State mandates have since changed, and these subjects have been added to the test.

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Honestly, I read TWTM and thought that was the kind of education I wanted my boys to have. I had not consider homeschooling up to that point; I really didn't even know that homeschooling was a viable option.

 

It's funny how I came across TWTM. My oldest was not your traditional student in K and 1st grade. He had trouble sitting still so long in public school. I was reading books by Tobias on different learning styles trying to help him as he struggled to assimilate to a public school setting. Based on my buying history, Amazon recommended that I purchase TWTM. I put it on my Christmas list and received it as a gift. The rest is history.

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We started out in ps, but eventually gave up because I was so unhappy with the curriculum. I hated the way they were teaching reading and math, and social studies and science were a joke.

 

While I think NCLB has room for improvement, I don't blame it for the direction many schools have gone. If the schools would just adopt really good reading and math instruction, there would be plenty of time for it all. As long as they use "balanced reading" and fuzzy math, they aren't going to make much progress. The Core Knowledge schools are getting it all done.

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are mainly reactions to the mandates of NCLB. For instance, many of the math curriculae that are used reflect the way the questions, etc. are worded on the standardized tests. "Estimate" and "write about your answer" have replaced "Work these sums." Most of the textbook companies now make no apologies, and use "aligned with standardized testing" as a selling point to districts.

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Before I was married I saw many examples of homeschooled kids and really liked what I saw. The freedom to explore interests, the lack of social pressure, not having a grading system; these things appealed to me. I also began to wonder at this 'thing' we do as a society: farming our children away from home to get a "good education". Why? How did that start?

 

When my dd was 3 my husband and I attended a homeschooling conference in WI. It was awesome! We learned so much! Meanwhile, two of my cousins were homeschooling their kids and that provided me with further inspiration and support.

 

Because I wasn't confidant enough to begin, I succumbed to pressure (my own, mostly) to enroll my daughter in Kindergarten. It was not a stunning success on many levels. She didn't do terrible. But she didn't thrive. I volunteered alot, but could see that so much time and intelligence was wasted on controlling the masses, organizing the masses, disciplining the masses and shuttling the masses. I was also able to see how 'hemmed in' the teachers talents were by the politics of state, district and school board administration. I wanted out. Then I read John Taylor Gatto.

 

My cousin gave me TWTM. Now I was motivated, armed and given confidence. I started our journey in the fall when my daughter was 6. She is 10 now.

 

While you didn't ask this part, it's been a very, very, interesting journey. I don't think I started gaining confidence until about a year or so ago. And then I have my not so confidant days. Lot's of them. I'll bet public teachers do, too. We've morphed from a strict WTM classical view to a more relaxed view. That works for us now. It'll change as my daughter does. But I would not trade homeschooling for ANYTHING.

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Fuzzy math really took hold when the NCTM standards were published in 1989. We haven't had good reading instruction in decades, if ever. My interpretation is that NCLB was a response to those and an attempt to move away from these constructivist approaches. "Reading First" clearly advocates phonics based instruction.

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My first exposure to homeschoolers was when a friend asked me to teach a group of homeschooled 4-H girls to sew. I, too, was impressed with their character and behavior. Then, when we grew unhappy enough with the way ps was working (or not working) for our sons, my memories of that great group of young people helped me make the decision to homeschool our own sons.

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But it's the states that pick what tests to use.

 

No, it differs by state. Here in my state, the local district Superintendent of Schools or Curriculum Coordinator, (both local employees) pick the curriculum. And towns that are under heavy pressure to improve test scores pick curricula that promise improvement. Both of these individuals often are very, very far removed from the actually classroom trenches, and do not consult with teachers for recommendations/input/reviews.

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I knew there was no way he would make it in a mainstream classroom. I originally planned on just homeschooling for a year, but it's been six years now.

 

I still homeschool primarily because of DS's LD's, but I am totally sold on the benefits of homeschooling overall.

Michelle T

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That's what I meant- each state picks what test it will use. They also pick their own proficiency standards. I think that is the real weakness of NCLB. Without uniform standards and testing the results are really meaningless.

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NCLB was concieved as a way to remedy to falling test scores and make education equal for all students. It was modeled after a flawed and misrepresented report by the Austin school district.

 

Unfortunately, there are many difficult reasons why districts are performing poorly on standardized tests, including a lack of support for/value of education at home, language barriers, etc.

 

Interesting:

No Child Left Behind:

The Football Version

Author Unknown*

 

l. All teams must make the state playoffs, and all will win the championship. If a team does not win the championship, they will be on probation until they are the champions, and coaches will be held accountable.

 

2. All kids will be expected to have the same football skills at the same time and in the same conditions. No exceptions will be made for interest in football, a desire to perform athletically, or genetic abilities or disabilities. ALL KIDS WILL PLAY FOOTBALL AT A PROFICIENT LEVEL

 

3. Talented players will be asked to work out on their own without instruction. This is because the coaches will be using all their instructional time with the athletes who aren't interested in football, have limited athletic ability, or whose parents don't like football.

 

4. Games will be played year round, but statistics will only be kept in the 4th, 8th, and 11th games.

 

5. This will create a New Age of sports where every school is expected to have the same level of talent and all teams will reach the same minimal goals.

 

If no child gets ahead, then no child will be left behind.

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Whitney Tilson rewrote the football version

 

 

No Child Left Behind: The Football Version

 

1. All teams must play hard and do their best. If a team is poorly managed and disorganized, it will be put on probation until it improves, and the coaches will be held accountable. The children and their parents will not be blamed for the failure of the coaches.

 

2. All kids will be expected to play. Obviously, some kids will play with more skill than others, but all kids will be expected to work hard and perform at a proficient level. Some kids may need to work extra hours to achieve proficiency. The coaches will be expected to put in those extra hours with the kids to ensure their success.

 

3. Coaches will not focus their resources solely on the handful of players who demonstrate unusual proficiency at an early age. Coaches will be held accountable for the success of EVERY player.

 

4. Games will be played year round, and statistics will be collected, analyzed and widely disseminated frequently.

 

5. This will create a New Age of sports where every kid learns the necessary tools to succeed.

 

Just because some children get ahead, it's not acceptable that many children get left behind.

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I didn't even go to Kindergarten (1970's). So I couldn't imagine sending my little person on the big yellow bus only to see him again 7+hours later. :eek:

 

So, I decided to do K at home (a co-worker of my husband homeschooled). I went to the library and found a few books (including TWTM) and off I went. K was so successful that I had made my child too accelerated for 1st grade. So, we've just kept at this great experiment.

 

There are new reasons every year to continue (a few years back our county adopted Everyday Math). The real dumbing down of the local schools keeps us on our path. I see the what the public school's around here provide for instruction and it's pretty pathetic.

 

k

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There is not a single reason we chose to hs. I actually loved our school and faculty. A friend recommended TWTM years ago.. My copy is scribbled in, notes galore, highlighted, etc. I believe in the concept, but doubted my own ability to remain calm and committed long enough to enable my DCs to thrive. I also ABHOR standardized testing; it's a joke to waste an entire academic year to teaching 30 questions. DD and DS both aced last year's tests. I was appalled at the results--not proud. It was wasted time supported by legislation and our tax dollars.

 

The catalyst to pull them out last semester was when I told vice principal we were taking an academic trip to Rome. Time to introduce our DC to ancient history! She dropped a bomb informing me that district policy is that more than 10 absences may subject kiddos to not passing grade level. That left 4 sick days, most of which had been used. (I'm angry now at the audacity of the policy.) She was heartbroken, but has to follow her guidelines. That afternoon we made the decision. The principal actually cried and apologized for "failing your sweet children". Despite the compassion, it's been such a wonderful experience!

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What first sparked me was reading WTM (my oldest was 2 at that time). I happened to pick up a book that profiled homeschoolers at the library, and thought I would read a little more about this interesting phenomenon. The first couple of books I read were not really all that impressive, but when I picked up WTM, suddenly it was like someone had laid out my personal ideal education for me. I had never once considered homeschooling before then. I spent the next two years waffling and trying to make a decision, and then took the plunge.

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"We're really going to miss her scores. She did so well on the standardized tests that it helped boost the average scores quite a bit."

 

:eek:

 

Actually, I shouldn't be shocked. My parents heard something very similar when they insisted I be graduated early from high school. The administration was very resistant at first, but it turned out that that had nothing to do with grades or my preparedness for college, but with the fact that they'd be "losing" my scores and the per-student money that I represented. :mad:

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:eek:

 

Actually, I shouldn't be shocked. My parents heard something very similar when they insisted I be graduated early from high school. The administration was very resistant at first, but it turned out that that had nothing to do with grades or my preparedness for college, but with the fact that they'd be "losing" my scores and the per-student money that I represented. :mad:

 

I've heard that on this board several times. It just makes you want to slap somebody.

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I had been planning on putting dd into school until it was time to register. We went to observe a K class and I couldn't picture it. Dd was already reading well, she knew a lot of math, and I just couldn't see sending her away all day (or half day.)

 

It had nothing to do with testing, fear, or even protection. It really started by me not wanting her to go somewhere else every day at age 5. Then, I found WTMind and it was all over from there! I knew that was what I wanted.

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Our decision was based on many things. It started with a competitive gymnast that wanted more time. She spent her days from 8-3 at school then straight to gym and got home from gym between 7-8:30 daily. So we started her because of this, although it was an option we had always discussed.

 

DD #2 was still in public school. At 5 was put into a 1st grade classroom and was only 1 of 2 children in the entire first grade that could read her own tests. They thought she was very gifted because of this. :eek:

 

DD #3 went to public school the next year in Pre-K. I sent her for "socialization" :rolleyes: and to give me a little of time to homeschool the other two. :o About a month into school they took away their recess and snack time to have more "learning time". At. four. years. old. Pah-leeeze!

 

There were many other reasons, but these are some of the biggies.

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I had always been interested in hs-ing, but never had the confidence or wanted to go against family and societal pressure, so my first two dc went to full preschool and until my oldes was in 1st grade. Any time I would discuss hs-ing with family, I would get the usual 'kooky', 'socialization' and 'how will you know if your kids are really learning' feedback, so I just admired it from afar.

 

In November of my oldest dd's first grade year, she became very ill and had to be taken out of school until after Christmas. I worked with the teacher, having her work sent back and forth to school. After about 3 weeks, I delivered a batch of work to the teacher and asked for some more. I was told that was it for the semester! So I was able to do with a very ill child in a few relaxed hours a day in 3 weeks what the school was planning for about 7! After that, I began researching hs in earnest and just doing my own thing for the next few weeks. She went back after Christmas, only to be set back by more illnesses. I remember one week that she missed, the teacher said not to even bother with work because every day was a 'special' day or party anyway. I never sent her back and we have been hs-ing ever since. when she was in school, I never liked the curriculum and all the wasted time/ crowd control I saw when I volunteered, either.

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For our family we came at it from two sides. I "discovered" Christian, classical education via Doug Wilson's books and Norms and Nobility our last year of college, so pre-children. I was a history major and dh was a philosophy major and we left university wishing we had learned more, read more Great Books, etc. We decided that we wanted some sort of education that gave our children a head start on being thoughtful, articulate people who loved goodness, truth and beauty. (Dh is a big fan of Plato ;)) As I started to look into private schools that were starting up at the time doing Classical, Christian ed. I was impressed with their goals, but couldn't quite figure out how a single-income family (we wanted me to be home and available for our children full-time) and that one income coming from a graphic designer's salary could pay for multiple school tuitions. Then by following the links online, I stumbled on a "recommended reading list" which had The Well-Trained Mind on it. I bought it. Thought it was fabulous and doable, AND realized that I couldn't imagine a better use for my interests and gifts than teaching my own children. So I gained not only a path for educating our (still future) children BUT a "vocation" as well. Fantastic! For me the time-tested and integrated nature of classical education (soul and mind) keep me firmly in this camp. But I have grown in my appreciation and enjoyment of homeschooling as a family lifestyle as well.

 

Dh, on the other hand, was less concerned about a certain academic model (other than exposure to Great Ideas and literature) than he was a lifestyle which allowed for individuality. His school experience was one of the square peg in the round hole or a cog in the machine and it left him a bit wounded. He wanted our children to have the opportunity to safely be a little quirky, to have time to play, draw, create in ways they may not in a traditional classroom. We both wanted sibling relationships to be encouraged not undermined, which we felt the traditional school structure tends to do (in our experience).

 

So now we homeschool for both reasons. :) I get to teach Latin, tell Greek myths, catechize, and expose my children to rich literature, music, art, nature, and the flow of history. And dh is encouraged that his children have time to be children, live in fantasy worlds, be one another's best friend and not be belittled for walking to a different beat. It's a good life. :)

 

Jami

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In order to sign my oldest up for K I was supposed to fill out a questionaire that started with the question, "Was the child born vaginally or by c-section and if vaginally were forceps used?" That was as far as I got. I have a real problem with labels and the fact they were going to try to label my kid before they even met him really irked me. I actually had him go to a private K since I had toddler twins and a newborn and didn't think I could do it. The private school was great but so expensive I couldn't keep doing it. I tried a charter school the next year because I thought I still couldn't do it... the other kids took so much of my time. I wish I had listened to myself and started then. The charter school only taught my ds to freak out at tests and that he should already know everything (he did know everything in that class). It took years to deprogram him. He cried everytime he got an answer wrong because he NEVER got anything wrong in school. I spent every spare minute that year researching curriculum and resources available in our community. The next year I was teaching my oldest and my twins and we haven't stopped. This is our 7th year. I wouldn't trade it for anything.

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We have a daughter(actually my neice) that has problems and couldn't get through a school day without a lot of services. We started homeschooling. When I saw how badly her education was going and looked into what they were actually teaching I decided to keep my other kids home too. My in-laws are mortified!!

 

So to sum it up. Fuzzy Math,or more specifically, Everyday Math and having a child with an IEP that wasn't really expected to do much during the day pretty much started us on this road. By the way our state just had their NECAP results and as a state the students scored 28th percentile. Meaning that only 28% of the students scored proficient at Math. According to Fordham NH gets an F grade for our state standards and still the kids are failing. I figure I can't do any worse.

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Dh and I had long discussions about the type of education we wanted for our dd.Public school just wasn't acceptable,for many of the reasons other posters have already mentioned.Private school didn't seem much better.And everyone kept telling us that we were responsible for our child (meaning that they had no intentions of helping us raise our child in any way,shape or form) so we couldn't understand why we were supposed to just hand that responsibility over to someone else when she reached the arbitrary age of 5.

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When Luke was four, he was in a two-day a week preschool at our church, and Peyton went to the 2-yr old MDO there as well. In February of that year, we had had some illness inour family for about three solid months. I just decided to take them out so we could get well without being exposed to any more germs. I really planned to enroll them back into the PS for the fall, as it was a lovely place with teachers we attended church with, and homeschooling wasn't really even on the radar.

 

BUT, in looking for something "academic" to do with them while they were home, I came across Five in a Row. We started that, fell in love with learning at home and just never stopped.

 

We have no experience with public school, so I can't say that we were driven away from anything. We just love homeschooling!

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Up until 5th grade dd had been in private or public schools and had excellent teachers and I had no problems. In 5th grade many little problems piled up. DD would finish work early and instead of giving her more work, they told her to read. [she reads at high school level]

The teacher could not read many of the students handwriting so she made them all print! The next year the kids were to be going into middle school were there is no printing.

Georgia, at least in this area, teaches to test the CRCT. There is no 'teaching' going on. Then there are the middle schools in Savannah. Just awful. There are more reasons, but one after another after another and one day I just snapped and yanked her out.

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My motivation? My own public school education.

 

I once read a statement by a gifted little girl from Britain about her school experience: "I already know all the lessons, and I don't like the custard."

 

I went to schools that were, at the time, among the best in New York, when New York had some of the best schools in the country. My high school still shows up year after year on that "best high schools" ranking.

 

Feh.

 

I already knew all the lessons, and I didn't like the custard. And I had a sneaking suspicion that any child of mine and my wife's would be in the same boat.

 

That was my motivation for beginning to homeschool. I continue for many other reasons, including the fact that my dd not only knows all the lessons, but won't eat custard even at home. We are nearly certain she has some type of SPD (we're still waiting to get in for an evaluation). While we of course hope that therapy will help that problem, realistically we couldn't send her to school at this point even if we wanted to.

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As a child I didn't have a good experience in the public school system. When our youngest was reaching school age I met some ladies at our church that homeschooled. It was then we decided that we wanted to try homeschooling. I thought I'd do it a few years and I never imagined I'd be homeschooling a 9th grader :)

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The very first time I ever heard about homeschooling, when I was single and living in Ontario, I was instantly for it. To say I hated ps from Gr. 4 on and did not think ps did a good job for kids like I was (not just my experience, but what I'd seen teaching piano in the Ottawa schools) is putting it mildly.

 

However, dh's motivation was me finally convincing him that ps wasn't working for dd and doing enough research to show him facts regarding socialization. Plus friends of ours were starting to.

 

Just adding, that there are many reasons, but this is it in a nutshell.

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First of all, I had a friend who homeschooled her five children (now she has six). The oldest was a girl, who came to help me for a couple of weeks after our second daughter was born. She was so extremely helpful, and had such great character (she was 13 at the time) that, for the first time, I began to seriously consider the benefits of homeschooling. She actually helped me every single day with balancing the demands of a toddler and a newborn; she didn't turn on the TV or sit listening to music, ignoring me when I needed help. She was an excellent example of the good character that homeschooling can put into a child.

 

Secondly, our small town only has two private school options, and they both run only through 8th grade. Since we're Protestant, we went to the local Protestant school. When our oldest was in third grade, she ran afoul of the rest of her classmates for being more advanced academically than they were, and suffered most of the year from the brunt of their cliquishness and taunting. By the end of that year, we were determined to make homeschooling work.

 

Thirdly, we wanted both a Christian education and a highly academic one, too. That's why, after our first year of homeschooling (I read TWTM after my first month of homeschooling) we started a classical education with our daughters, and I have no regrets about that.

 

Next year, though, things may change for our family. I'm taking the GRE at the end of March, and may go back to graduate school in the fall. My dh was diagnosed with an enlarged heart in the fall, and had to have a defibrillator implanted in his heart. We have prayed about this situation and feel that, for the sake of the whole family, it might be wise for me to get myself into a marketable position. We are trusting God and are not fearful, but we're also trying to use wisdom. DH has made a good recovery and is doing much better. However, he feels it would be too much for me to go to grad. school and homeschool. No final decisions have been made, but the eldest may go to the local cc, the middle daughter may start at the high school, and the youngest may go to the other private school, a Catholic one, that runs K-8. We'll have to see how things all work out.

 

Whatever happens, I'm so glad we homeschooled. If we end up quitting homeschooling next year, I'm probably going to cry buckets because I've really come to enjoy it, even those terrible days when you wonder what insanity possessed you to put yourself through this torture!

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Quality of the public schools in my area was #1. I did some research, and at the time my oldest would have enrolled in K, the local school was ranked at one star out of 5. I knew I could do better than that!

 

As we started homeschooling, we found all the wonderful benefits of having the kids home!

 

Now that the kids are older, another worry is the prevalence of gang activity in our area. There were two drive by shootings within 10 miles of our house just last weekend. They found a high school student dead in a field less than a mile from our house. Another kid was shot while pumping gas into his car last year. All gang related... nope, my kids will not be going to public school here.

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We initially chose homeschooling because it seemed very wrong to me to send a 5 year old off to school all day.

 

Plus, I had wanted to be a teacher, but it made no sense to me to put my kids in daycare, or school, so that I could get a job to teach kids.

 

Finally, the idea of doing it excited me. I knew I could do it. I knew I could do it well, and I knew I'd enjoy doing it.

 

So there you go :)

 

Now, we have several more reasons for continuing on this path.

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I had debated about it before my son even entered preschool. I was pressured by family and myself that it wouldn't be "right" to keep him home. Well, I finally pulled him out this year. He is in 5th grade according to the ps system here but he has increible ADHD he is gifted and with me being able to work the schedule for him he will be heading into most subjects that are 7th grade and higher next year.

 

My aunt and uncle have 14 kids and she homeschools (or has graduated) a total of 12 of them. She was a true inspiration to me and always will be. We go to their house weekly for a class and I try to get out there to visit often. Their children have always been inspiring do to their well behaved manner and how curious they are for learning anything.

 

I plan on pulling my daughter home this next year. I am still getting a ton of the same pressures I got from my family when I wanted to pull ds. Even though most agree it was the best thing for my ds and how the "old ds" is back!!! I just don't understand people. My Dad is very unsupportive of the whole idea because he is upset with the above mentioned uncle for marrying who he did so that makes him judgemental of all homeschoolers...DRIVES ME CRAZY!!!!!

 

I could have summed this up like Lynn.....ADHD, gifted and too many phone calls home!!!

 

Sorry to drag this out!!!!

 

Alison

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If I had known about homeschooling when I was in high school, I probably would have tried to convince my parents to let me do it. I would have *loved* to learn at my own pace, without the gangs, and the boys, all the other things I could have done without.

 

Fast forward 10+ years and we're putting our first dd into Montessori school so that *she* could learn at her own pace. Only she had multiple anaphylactic food allergies. What *I* learned is that I couldn't trust her teachers to keep her safe in that environment, nor were they willing to work with me very well (in that particular school). So I pulled her out, and figured that if a private Montessori school isn't going to care about her, how much worse would PS be? Plus, with adding kids in the mix we couldn't afford private for all of them.

 

There are many moments this highly sensitive mom wants to send them all back to school, but really, we love homeschooling for many more reasons than just the food allergy thing that started it all. Especially for that oldest DD, who is kind of ADD and definitely a very right brained learner. She would be struggling big time in her grade level at school, and have no time to develop her talents.

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My core reason for homeschooling is the nitpicky DAILY negative socialization at just about any institutional school setting. Teasing. Bullying. Social isolation. Negative peer pressure.

 

School shootings don't bother me too much --those are pretty rare.

 

But i will NOT send my kid to a place where he has to put up w/ that kind of social carp every stinking day.

 

I liked most of my PS experience except for the freaking back biting of so many students.

 

In the real world, if a person does something illegal, they have Real Consequences.

 

In the real World, if someone is being a total a$$, you can LEAVE that job or situation or insist that something be done.

 

So that was my first biggest reason. no matter how far "behind" my kids may be academically, they can always catch up in peace. But those nasty social scars stick w/ you a long time and THAT's what i consider everytime I start feeling burned out. The religious benefits are nice, but not my prime reason.

 

Yes, i believe NCLB is a joke, but as was mentioned, the schools were in a pretty sad state even before that --thus the "need" for NCLB, lol. So much for that idea! unfortunately I'm afraid that even if they repeal NCLB they'll be putting something just as wacky and restrictive in its place. The nature of the beast is to regulate. At the Obama rally he mentioned that he'll reform the school system first by paying teachers more. But NO teacher i ever asked mentioned an increase in pay to reform the schools. After reading everyone's stances on education reform, i see a common thread: their "plan" is to throw more money at everything. The only Change we'll see is what's left in our couch cushions, lol. I'd be interested in a candidate that will return ultimate control of the education to the states. oh...wait.... there is one!! :D

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I have my school district to thank! They completely motivated me to homeschool my son when he entered high school. I had the school's faculty motivate me by their apathy, ignorance of how to educate the gifted, elitism, complete lack of communication, and total lack of caring.

 

When my dd got to be school age, it was a no-brainer.

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I wanted my dc to have an excellent ed.

 

I attended private schools before k, but then my parents couldn't afford it any more, so my mom hs'ed me for a few mos. She was also babysitting & says I was curious about public sch, so she let me go.

 

I was quickly bored, & she pulled me back out, but she says hs'ing laws back then were...different. Plus, she believed whatever the ps told her, & they made all kinds of threats until she sent me back.

 

I remember in particular my freshman yr of comp in college. I'd always been in honors/GT/AP English classes & hadn't learned anything new in YEARS, so when I got my first F, I was livid. I ended up w/ an A in the class, but the fact that there was ANYTHING left to learn & my highschool classes hadn't bothered made me MAD.

 

In my 12 yrs of public/private school & app 7 yrs of college, my ed has never covered Einstein, either of the WWs, how to write a lab report for science (the main reason I was scared of it for so long, lol), etc. Reg math was a joke, but adv math moved too fast for me. Etc, etc, etc.

 

Also, of course, I want to know EVERYTHING, & going through the entire hist of the world w/ my own dc 3x seems like a good start!

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Well, actually, it was dh's idea to begin with. Before we even had children, he wanted to homeschool due to his bad experiences with public school.

 

What motivated ME to start homeschooling?

Academics initially--I just couldn't see oldest ds in kindergarten. He was already reading at 4 and we had a wonderful time doing letter of the week, then FIAR together before he even got to kindergarten age. He would have been bored stiff in public school and I wasn't ready to send him away, even for half a day.

 

I was nervous initially though, I knew I could get through kindergarten with him, but had no idea what to do beyond that. Then I read TWTM and I knew it outlined the education I wanted for him, and I saw how I could do it myself.

 

So now that we're going--I like being able to add religion into our studies, I love the close relationship my sons have with each other, I like being able to let them go at their own pace, and I still have a bad feeling whenever I drive past the elementary school. I have for years, every time I'd consider sending them there, I'd drive by and have a bad feeling. So I feel confident that we're doing what we're supposed to be doing right now.

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