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I have been awake since 4:00 am in a state of total panic.

 

So my Sarah is a junior, and now it is the second semester of her junior year.

 

Obviously that means that in the fall she will be a senior. And then she will go to college.

 

What if the grand experiment that is known as Homeschooling Sarah is a dismal failure? What if she can't make it in the big college world? What if I was too obsessed with the perfect four year history cycle with perfectly matched literature when I should have just done social studies the same way the public school down the road does it? What if I can't get her past her writing phobia and convince her that when she actually produces some writing it is very good? What if she stares at her blank computer screen for hours in a dorm room, much as she does here? What if you are all right about Teaching Textbooks and even with the addition of that 30 minutes per day of Aleks, it just isn't enough? And Latin, we failed at Latin. We failed at multiple tries at Latin. So now, late in the game, we have NO foreign language credit. :eek: We are left with no choice but to toss her into community college and have her take one of their foreign languages and hope she makes it. We have run out of time. What if Apologia science just doesn't lay the foundation she needs for college science? And how much biology and chemistry could a political science major need, anyway? I mean, yes, they call it a science but it isn't really a science.

 

I am so afraid that I have failed her. I am so afraid that I have destroyed her chances of a fulfilling life. What kind of craziness was this whole thing? Who do I think I am to direct her education? I barely survived high school. The only thing I excelled in during all of high school was finding keg parties. I forgot to go to college. I really doubt that qualifies me to shape her life.

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I took German in junior high school as an elective; in senior high school I took choir, which I loved. Believe it or not, I majored in German at college, because they had a foreign language requirement! I don't know what colleges require today as far as foreign language. Probably it varies, depending on the college. Can your daughter take a foreign language at the community college and transfer it over to her four-year school? What schools is your daughter looking at? What are their requirements? Each college is different.

 

Don't despair! (Although I have a sneaking suspicion the same panic may take hold of me next year! My daughter is a sophomore this year!) :eek:

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I took German in junior high school as an elective; in senior high school I took choir, which I loved. Believe it or not, I majored in German at college, because they had a foreign language requirement! I don't know what colleges require today as far as foreign language. Probably it varies, depending on the college. Can your daughter take a foreign language at the community college and transfer it over to her four-year school? What schools is your daughter looking at? What are their requirements? Each college is different.

 

Don't despair! (Although I have a sneaking suspicion the same panic may take hold of me next year! My daughter is a sophomore this year!) :eek:

 

Whether it transfers or not, she will be taking either Spanish I and II OR French I and II during her two semesters of 12th grade at our local community college. This is to fulfill highschool requirements, we have to have two credits of foreign language in high school. Sigh. I so wanted it to be Latin, but we were all so stumped by Latin. We tried, we really tried. Now I am just terrified that at the end of the road, if she can't cut it in the community college classes that all will be lost and she will graduate without the required foreign language. My oldest graduated without foreign language and while he did get into college and even received an academic scholarship, he only survived one semester at the university and he has never gone back to school. I am hoping for better for this Lab Experiment.

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Hey Kelli,

 

Gosh you sound really similiar to me. I have a second semester junior as well. I failed repeatedly at Latin too! And my 17 yo dd is taking Spanish at the local community college. One semester though is worth 2 high school credits. And she's really learning Spanish from someone who actually speaks the language and has experience teaching it. So I think things have worked out well. My dd got enough Latin to spark her interest and to help her a bit with Spanish. She's been talking about wanting to take Latin in college!

 

I am not familiar with Apologia but when I was a poli-sci major I only took one hard science class, Environmental science. I think I took two psychology classes though. Anyway, I think your dd will be fine. The only poli-sci class I struggled with was statistics because I'm not a mathy and it was HARD for me. Fortunately I had a friend who helped me through that class.

 

And about the writing thing. . . well, you still have another year to help her polish those skills!

 

So imho, you have nothing to worry about! It's just that at 4 in the morning everything looms large and spooky! But hopefully with the morning light, things will seem better. Hope you get a nap today!

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I think it is normal for us homeschool moms to panic. We all want to do a good job, have our dc do great in college, life, etc. It is a validation of the many years we spent getting them to this level. And all the blood, sweat and tears it took! That being said, I think it is important to look back at the original goals you had when you started homeschooling. For instance, ours were to teach our dc to think, reason, love (or at least like) to learn, and have a heart for God. There is no way we can teach our children everything. However, I think that we are meeting our goals.

 

If your child has the tools to learn she will succeed. Sure she may have to take some classes at the community college. My dd will, too. But that will give her more time to mature and decide what she wants to do. I know it is easy for me to say don't panic as my daughter is only in 10th grade.:rolleyes: But the TWTM has given us the opportunity to provide a great foundation for our children. And BTW, we only did two years of Latin, and my dd found that to be a great help when she took Spanish.

 

Know I need to get more coffee, as I seem to be having trouble putting together coherent sentences.

 

Veronica

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Oh Kelli!

Hang in there, kiddo. I know, my ds is going to CC next year to finish his senior year. He is a year older because we held him back, so he's going to college "on time," but really is dual enrolled.

 

He's not a great writer, either, so I think we are going to try Write At Home. It's online, starting this week. Do you want to do it with us? lol We are starting way back at Essay 1. I've failed him in the writing dept, so this is to make it up to him. Your dd will be ok, I promise.

 

You have given her a broad, beautiful education. I know, because I've seen what you are using. She is well-read, and just the fact that she has been exposed to Latin will give her a head's up on the Spanish or French she'll take in CC. Spanish is easier, btw, but I like French better because it opens more missionary opportunities in Africa and Europe--but that's just me! lol

 

I seem to recall you are a woman of faith, right? ROFL Of course you are. Take heart, sweet one. Our children belong to the Lord. He will whisper in their ears when to turn left and when to turn right. You have taught her to hear His Voice. It's up to her to still her soul and listen--and God will help with that, too, if she asks.

It's so hard to let them go--and God is holding you, too. Tenderly and with great love--let his comfort seep into you and quiet your worries. All will be well, Kelli.

 

Peace,

Chris

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What if the grand experiment that is known as Homeschooling Sarah is a dismal failure? What if she can't make it in the big college world? What if I was too obsessed with the perfect four year history cycle with perfectly matched literature when I should have just done social studies the same way the public school down the road does it?

 

Well, it sounds as though you have been teaching history and literature. Chances are that she has read more and understands more than the average public school counterpart. I'd say this is something to quit worrying about. My kids knew more history in 8th grade than I knew after graduating from college. When my dd went in to discuss possible history minor with the head of the history dept., Beth kept up with the discussion on politics and history in a way that made my head spin. I can't imagine that the prof. sees this everyday!!!!! It was rather rewarding watching the two of them--and I being the homeschool mom :-).

 

What if I can't get her past her writing phobia and convince her that when she actually produces some writing it is very good? What if she stares at her blank computer screen for hours in a dorm room, much as she does here?

 

The senior year is a great year for writing. The child starts applying to college and has to write all those essays--one right after another. They all are different and yet they all are somewhat the same. My dd started writing them up in about a day's time. Amazing!

 

And if she stares at the blank computer screen, she will have tons a company in college. My dd spends a lot of time helping others with their papers. you know--the daughter who could never write anything well and who wrote her first "acceptable" paragraph in 9th grade. I never thought she'd be known as a good writer. Yikes! A few of the students are very good at writing. A lot of them simply do not know how to write at all. My dd says her jaw nearly hit the floor her 1st semester when she saw what the other students where handing in to the prof. as a "paper". My expectations were soooooo much higher.

 

What if you are all right about Teaching Textbooks and even with the addition of that 30 minutes per day of Aleks, it just isn't enough?

 

O.K. So she isn't going to be able to major in math or a math based field of study. Um. I'd say it is likely she doesn't WANT to major in those fields, right? Do what you can and move on. If the rest of her ACT scores can bring her up to a 19 or above, she'll be able to get into several colleges. If she can pull a 21 or higher, she can get into most colleges. If she can pull a 26, she will start qualifying for some academic scholarships--and that "26" on the ACT is the average between her math, science, English and Reading. If one is higher and math is lower, it is just the balance between them. If she wants to go into Poli Sci, then she will not need a high math score--most kids have a field they do well in and a field they do not do so well it. That's life, right?

 

 

And Latin, we failed at Latin. We failed at multiple tries at Latin. So now, late in the game, we have NO foreign language credit. :eek: We are left with no choice but to toss her into community college and have her take one of their foreign languages and hope she makes it. We have run out of time.

 

From what I've seen, you probably have enough time if you start right now. My dd tested out of 3 years of high school Spanish after doing 1.5 years of her Spanish program. Apparently, high schools do not teach much! If you start today, you could do 3 semesters of a language, and you probably will have more than enough to call it 2 years on the transcript. Sad, I know. (I was a Spanish major in college--so I do know what I am talking about just a little bit...)

 

 

What if Apologia science just doesn't lay the foundation she needs for college science? And how much biology and chemistry could a political science major need, anyway? I mean, yes, they call it a science but it isn't really a science.

 

The poli sci dept does not really care too much about her science scores. She'll be required to take a science for non-majors at most colleges. Apologia will serve her just fine. She'll probably know more than most of the kids in that class. Go back to bed and get some sleep.

 

I am so afraid that I have failed her. I am so afraid that I have destroyed her chances of a fulfilling life. What kind of craziness was this whole thing? Who do I think I am to direct her education?

 

If you've been reading, studying, learning, testing, and discussing (not just thinking you should be doing it), then I'd say your child will do fine. If she wants to get into Harvard or Yale, you might be disappointed. If she plans to attend area colleges, I'd say she will be just fine. My dd is the honor student with the scholarship. LOL! No one could have convinced me that would ever have happened. Even when they gave her the scholarship, I wasn't sure how well she'd do in college--I was scared she'd struggle.

 

And yes, she struggles. She struggles with boredom because she knows a lot of it already....

 

Get some sleep.

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Stop and breathe--I'm sure she'll do great. Enrolling here in a community college foreign language course is giving her practice for college, not "throwing her" in there.

 

She'll learn to deal with that blank computer screen--trust me as a college writing teacher, so many students have that concern. That she even knows that's an issue for her is a strength.

 

The great wealth of knowledge and support you have given her will get her through, I promise. My homeschooled child excelled in college and graduated with honors at 20, much after I experienced many moments of panic similar to that which you describe. :)

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As for the writing -- In the anti-thread, I mentioned ds never wrote more than a 3 page paper for me. He had a writing phobia too and I tried a lot of things to get him to write more. He now churns out 15-20 page research papers in college (and gets A's and B's) so something I did must have stuck way back in his brain.

 

Has she done any testing like ACT/SAT or others (I don't know what your state requirements are)?

 

Don't panic.

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Whoah! I think Pam needs to send you that Bob Newhart video, "Stop It". Just stop it, Kelli.

 

"What if the grand experiment that is known as Homeschooling Sarah is a dismal failure? What if she can't make it in the big college world?"

 

Okay, so what if she can't? Lots of people do other things in life. I'm sorry, but attending college is not the sole path to lifelong happiness or "success". How long to you think her average life span might be? Let's say 80. She can go to college any time during that life span. If she's not ready for it now, perhaps she'll be ready for it later. She has to *want* it. If she wants something else, instead, then that's really up to her. It *is* her life, after all. All you can do is give her a foundation, and steer her in the direction you *think* she should go, and you've certainly done that......

 

"What if I was too obsessed with the perfect four year history cycle with perfectly matched literature when I should have just done social studies the same way the public school down the road does it?"

 

Ummmm, NO. Having a child who's gone back to private school this year, I can unequivocally say that matching up your lit reading to the time period you're studying in history makes for a much richer, fuller study of both subjects and tends to make the info stick better, long term. Mine has world history from the Renaissance forward and American lit. this year. No rhyme or reason for either and both just scratch the surface...... And it's a 2007 Blue Ribbon School, by the way......

 

"What if I can't get her past her writing phobia and convince her that when she actually produces some writing it is very good? What if she stares at her blank computer screen for hours in a dorm room, much as she does here?"

 

Well, depending upon where she goes and the classes she takes, there may not be all that much writing. She does need to know that she will have deadlines and she must get something, anything on paper by those deadlines and get it turned in. Perhaps you could start now to give her hard deadlines by which things are required to be done, whatever the content. Maybe that would help her to see that what she does is fine.....

 

"What if you are all right about Teaching Textbooks and even with the addition of that 30 minutes per day of Aleks, it just isn't enough?"

 

Look at the requirements for a school she might potentially attend. What sort of math will she have to take there - statistics? I think she can do it..... Why not take an ACT or SAT for practice if you feel stressed and see how she does on it?

 

"And Latin, we failed at Latin. We failed at multiple tries at Latin. So now, late in the game, we have NO foreign language credit. We are left with no choice but to toss her into community college and have her take one of their foreign languages and hope she makes it. We have run out of time."

 

Okay, well I think that will be better than taking it at a larger college somewhere. And she will get through it. I entered college with a foreign language deficiency because my little school didn't even offer ANY foreign language. If worse comes to worse, she can take it while she's at college. Some schools offer intensive, emersion programs during the summer where you go all day. You really do learn more that way (and it's the way I ended up doing it), but it does get tiresome.....

 

"What if Apologia science just doesn't lay the foundation she needs for college science? And how much biology and chemistry could a political science major need, anyway? I mean, yes, they call it a science but it isn't really a science."

 

Exactly. Again, check a potential college's catalog and see what the coursework will include. You're probably only going to see a basic, single semester requirement for non-majors regarding a science. Thousands of hs kids across this country go to college annually after having done Apologia sciences. I think they will suffice.

 

"I am so afraid that I have failed her. I am so afraid that I have destroyed her chances of a fulfilling life. What kind of craziness was this whole thing? Who do I think I am to direct her education? I barely survived high school. The only thing I excelled in during all of high school was finding keg parties. I forgot to go to college. I really doubt that qualifies me to shape her life."

 

And having lived this life, you know what you would like to see done differently for her. And you love her. And you've done your best to give her a more fulfilling life. Who would have done more for her on a regular, yearly basis, than you? How is that crazy?

 

Regena

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And hopefully this will copy for me.... This is what UK requires for a political science degree. As you can see, one math class and two natural science classes are required:

 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in POLITICAL SCIENCE

120 hours (minimum)

 

Any student earning a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree must complete a minimum of 39 hours at the 300+ level. These hours are generally completed by the major requirements. However, keep this hour requirement in mind as you choose your course work for the requirements in the major. A complete description of College requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree can be found on page 94 of this publication.

 

University Studies Program Requirements Hours

I. Math 0-3

II. Foreign Language (placement exam recommended) 0-8

III. Inference--Logic 3-6

IV. Written Communication 3-6

V. Oral Communication 3

VI. Natural Sciences 6

VII. Social Sciences (partially completed by Premajor Requirement) 3

VIII. Humanities 6

IX. Cross-Cultural (can be completed by Premajor Requirement)

X. Electives (choose two Natural Science courses) 6

USP hours: 30-47

 

College Requirements Hours

I. Foreign Language (placement exam recommended) 0-8

II. Disciplinary Requirements

a. Natural Science (completed by USP Elective Requirement)

b. Social Science (completed by Premajor Requirements)

c. Humanities (choose 300+ level courses) 6

III. Laboratory or Field Work (can be completed by Premajor Requirement)

IV. Electives 6

Subtotal: College Requirement Hours: 12-20

 

Premajor Requirements Hours

*PS 101 American Government 3

PS 202 Orientation to Political Science 1

plus two of the following:

PS 210 Introduction to European Politics: East and West

or

*PS 212 Culture and Politics in the Third World

PS 235 World Politics

PS 240 Ideology, Political Change, and Contemporary Industrial Society

*PS 245 Introduction to Political Analysis

PS 255 State Government

PS 271 Introduction to Political Behavior

PS 280 Issues in Public Policy 6

Premajor hours: 10

 

Major Requirements Hours

Course Work Required for the Major

From the Major Department:

Area Courses

At least one course must be taken in each of the areas 1, 2, and 3 listed below and at least one course must be taken in another field; and 9 additional hours from the Areas listed below or PS 395, 490, and 491. At least 15 hours must be at the 300+ level

Note: Courses used to satisfy the premajor cannot be used to satisfy the area requirements. 21

Area 1 -- Theory and Methodology

PS 240, 245, 441G, 442G, 545, 549

Area 2 -- Comparative Politics

PS 210, 212, 411G, 412G, 417G, 419G, 420G, 421G, 427G, 428G, 429G, 538

Area 3 -- International Relations

PS 235, 430G, 431G, 433G, 436G, 437G, 439G, 532, 538, 539

Area 4 -- Political Process

PS 271, 470G, 472G, 473G, 474G, 476G, 479, 480G, 571, 584

Area 5 -- Public Administration

PS 280, 487G, 489G, 580, 584

Area 6 -- Public Law and Judicial Behavior

PS 461G, 463G, 465G, 467G, 566

Area 7 -- State and Local Politics

PS 255, 453G, 456G, 557

Other Courses

Choose 6 hours of PS courses (including 1-6 hours of PS 399) or approved courses from outside political science (see list below) 6

 

From Outside the Major Department Hours

Choose 15 hours outside Political Science at the 300+ level. 200+ level courses used to satisfy USP and College requirements can also be counted here. The courses must be chosen from the list that follows, or approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies and must include at least 6 hours from 2 different departments 15

AAS 200, 254, 260, 261, 328, 336, 417G, 431G, 432, 585, 587, 657

AEC 309, 324, 445G, 471, 479, 532

ANT -- all 200+ level courses

APP 200

COM 249, 281, 319, 381, 419, 449, 452, 453, 482, 483, 525

CS -- all 200+ level courses

ECO -- all 200+ level courses

EPE 301, 555

FAM 354, 509, 544, 550, 551, 563

FIN 423, 480

GEO -- all 200+ level courses

GLY 430

GER 317, 319

HIS -- all 200+ level courses

HON 201, 202, 301

JOU 204, 301, 499, 531, 532

TEL 319, 320, 453, 510

LAS 201, 395, 401

MGT 340, 341, 441, 450

PHI -- all 200+ level courses

PSY -- all 200+ level courses

RAE 270, 280, 340, 342, 430G

SOC -- all 200+ level courses

SW 222, 430, 523, 560, 571

SPA 312, 314, 438G, 512, 513, 514

STA -- all 200+ level courses

WS 200, 300, 350, 416

Major hours: 42

 

Electives Hours

Electives should be selected by the student to lead to the minimum total of 120 hours required for graduation 1

Total Minimum Hours Required for Degree 120

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I actually think that "0-3" designation implies that you don't even have to take a math class..... And here's what's included in "natural science", so as you can see, there are a ton of fun classes from which she could choose, not just the 'hard' stuff. Many universities will be similar in their requirements:

 

VI. NATURAL SCIENCES (six hours)

Upon completion of the natural sciences requirement – for each course taken – students will be able to: (1) demonstrate knowledge of major theories and

phenomena associated with a field or discipline of natural science; (2) demonstrate an understanding of scientific reasoning; and (3) identify the methods and

practices of inquiry associated with theoretical advances in a natural science discipline.

To fulfill the natural sciences requirement, complete at least six hours from the following courses:

 

Biology

BIO 102 Human Ecology

BIO 103 Basic Ideas of Biology

BIO 110 Introduction to Human Biology and Health

BIO 150 Principles of Biology I

BIO 151 Principles of Biology Laboratory I

BIO 152 Principles of Biology II

BIO 153 Principles of Biology Laboratory II

BIO 300 General Entomology

ENT 110 Insect Biology

ENT 300 General Entomology

PLS 104 Plants, Soils, and People: A Global Perspective

 

Chemistry

CHE 101 Molecular Science for Citizens

CHE 104 Introductory General Chemistry

CHE 105 General College Chemistry I

CHE 106 Introduction to Inorganic, Organic and Biochemistry

CHE 107 General College Chemistry II

CHE 108 Introduction to Inorganic, Organic and Biochemistry

Without Laboratory

CHE 115 General Chemistry Laboratory

 

Geography

GEO 130 Earth’s Physical Environment

 

Geology

GLY 110 Endangered Planet: An Introduction to Environmental Geology

GLY 120 Sustainable Planet: The Geology of Natural Resources

GLY 130 Dinosaurs and Disasters

GLY 150 Earthquakes and Volcanoes

GLY 160 Geology for Elementary Teachers

GLY 210 Habitable Planet: Evolution of the Earth System

GLY 220 Principles of Physical Geology

GLY 223 Introduction to Geology in the Rocky Mountains

 

Physics and Astronomy

AST 191 The Solar System

AST 192 Stars, Galaxies and the Universe

PHY 151 Introduction to Physics

PHY 152 Introduction to Physics

PHY 170 Black Holes and Time Travel

PHY 211 General Physics

PHY 213 General Physics

PHY 231 General University Physics

PHY 232 General University Physics

PHY 241 General University Physics Laboratory

PHY 242 General University Physics Laboratory

 

Physics and Geology

PHY 160 Physics and Astronomy for Elementary Teachers

GLY 160 Geology for Elementary Teachers

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She'll be fine! My ds dropped out of Latin. He did Teaching Textbook Algebra 2. We slogged through Spanish together, but I wished I had made him take a community college class in Spanish. His writing wasn't great, but he did it. He is now in his freshman year in college and on the dean's list. Oh, he also didn't do well on the SAT. He still got into college. It will be ok. I promise!!

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O.K. So she isn't going to be able to major in math or a math based field of study. Um. I'd say it is likely she doesn't WANT to major in those fields, right? Do what you can and move on. If the rest of her ACT scores can bring her up to a 19 or above, she'll be able to get into several colleges. If she can pull a 21 or higher, she can get into most colleges. If she can pull a 26, she will start qualifying for some academic scholarships--and that "26" on the ACT is the average between her math, science, English and Reading. If one is higher and math is lower, it is just the balance between them. If she wants to go into Poli Sci, then she will not need a high math score--most kids have a field they do well in and a field they do not do so well it. That's life, right?

 

 

.

 

Jean,

Thank you so much. Am I remembering correctly, is your daughter a political science major? Sarah is planning to major in poli-sci with a minor in history.

 

We have done the ACT once, in 10th grade. She is scheduled to take it again this spring. Her 10th grade overall score was 29, but she had not had geometry yet, so we are hoping that the score will come up a bit now that she is about halfway through geometry.

 

You are always such a calm and wise voice on these forums. :)

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My daughter's degree is poli. sci. as well, but her minor was women's studies. She went from homeschooling in middle school, to taking courses at the community college grades 10-12, to moving away to university. If she can be of any help, she's sitting across the table from me. :) I'm sure she would be curious what your daughter intends to do with a poli. sci. degree, as her own interests have changed since she graduated. :rolleyes: or :p, I'm not sure which is more appropriate.

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Thanks everyone! I would like to say I am calm and cool now, but that would be a lie. Really, all that is going to calm me is getting through this upcoming year. If she holds her own in dual credit classes then I will feel like she is going to make it.

 

But I do feel encouraged that you all stepped up to tell me to breathe.

 

I could really use a nap.

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IWhat if the grand experiment that is known as Homeschooling Sarah is a dismal failure?
Are you serious that your homeschooling your daughter is just an experiment? If so, then I can see why you might be feeling some serious doubts. But I trust that you are just using that term in a self-deprecating way.
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My daughter's degree is poli. sci. as well, but her minor was women's studies. She went from homeschooling in middle school, to taking courses at the community college grades 10-12, to moving away to university. If she can be of any help, she's sitting across the table from me. :) I'm sure she would be curious what your daughter intends to do with a poli. sci. degree, as her own interests have changed since she graduated. :rolleyes: or :p, I'm not sure which is more appropriate.

 

I would be curious what she intends to do with it too!:)

 

I don't think she knows for certain. She would like to be a behind the scenes person in government, or she might use the degree as pre-law. She just loves government and she loves politics so this is the route she wants to go.

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We have done the ACT once, in 10th grade. She is scheduled to take it again this spring. Her 10th grade overall score was 29, but she had not had geometry yet, so we are hoping that the score will come up a bit now that she is about halfway through geometry.

 

 

 

 

You are panicing with that score???? I wouldn't worry about her one bit.

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You are panicing with that score???? I wouldn't worry about her one bit.

 

But my older daughter scored a 31 and now her scholarship is hanging by a thread. I am not afraid that she can't get into college, I am afraid she will get there and find herself ill-prepare. It is one thing to get in to college, it is another to stay!:)

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Have her go through the books --

What Smart Students Know

 

7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens

 

Both helped my ds with time management. Also, get her using a planner (like Franklin Covey or Daytimer) now so when she gets there, she will know how to use them.

 

They have to learn how to stand on their own two feet, even if it is painful as a mom to watch.

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But surely you know that many many ps graduates lose their college scholarships. I can't count the number I know, just among our sons' friends. Your dd might indeed have difficulty in college, but I wouldn't assume it's your fault.

 

Oh, I know. My homeschooled son lost his. Then my public schooled (for 10th-12th) is in serious danger of losing hers.

 

That is why I am so frightened. So far 2 out of 2 of those we sent off to college have found it to be a shock!

 

And we have no college fund to bail them out with.

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Have her go through the books --

What Smart Students Know

 

7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens

 

Both helped my ds with time management. Also, get her using a planner (like Franklin Covey or Daytimer) now so when she gets there, she will know how to use them.

 

They have to learn how to stand on their own two feet, even if it is painful as a mom to watch.

 

 

She would read these. I am going to order both of them for her next payday. Thank you so much.

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Oh, I know. My homeschooled son lost his. Then my public schooled (for 10th-12th) is in serious danger of losing hers.

 

That is why I am so frightened. So far 2 out of 2 of those we sent off to college have found it to be a shock!

 

And we have no college fund to bail them out with.

 

What does your current high school student think about how her siblings have done? Has she absorbed any of the "what not to do if you want to keep your scholarship" tips?

 

I do think dual enrollment next year will be a good start on developing those crucial college success skills. I think that is one very good reason for Jrs. & Srs. to take some outside coursework.

 

As you look at schools with potential academic scholarships look at the GPA necessary to keep them. A 3.0 GPA is not THAT hard to keep up for a good student as long as they DO THEIR WORK and don't kick back from Thursday night through Sunday. Scholarships that require a higher GPA, especially the ones that require 3.5 are the kickers because it's much harder to keep an A average, especially if you're at a more challenging school.

 

I told my oldest daughter straightaway when she went off to a private college that if she lost her big scholarship because she didn't keep a 3.0 that she was on her own. I let her know up front that losing her scholarship didn't mean taking out loans (she would be ineligible for ANY loans due to our income); it would mean coming home to live and getting a minimum wage job to pay her way through community college. During her sophomore year when she hit a slump, I had to remind her of that again when her peers tried to tell her, "No big deal. Lots of kids lose their scholarships and just take out loans." She did keep it together and graduated with her scholarships intact. After hearing about so many students losing their scholarships and the stress dd had of trying to maintain a 3.5 for her smaller scholarship, I was careful when we looked at schools for our second dd. One reason amongst others that we passed up a private school was that their requirement to maintain the big scholarship was 3.5. I didn't want her to have that stress. She has a very nice scholarship at the school she chose with a 3.0 requirement- far less stressful! So far, she seems to be doing well enough to keep it.

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Kelli,

 

Are you a member of the Apologia_Science yahoo group? If not, join it! I just read a post from Greg Sabouri about Teaching Textbooks that you might find reassuring. I would cut and paste it here, but I'm not sure if that's proper yahoo group/message board etiquette.

 

My oldest dd is in 8th grade, so I am not yet where you are in this journey. But I have been doing this long enough to know that you have to do what fits for each kid. I loved math and algebra when I was in school and I am a big fan of Singapore's NEM and Foerster Algebra, and mean mom that I am, my oldest is using both. But my middle dd learns differently, and she was falling further and further behind with standard math texts. I kept thinking that I need something like Calvert Spelling on CD for math; Calvert Spelling opened the worlds of spelling and writing for my dd, and I needed to find something in a similar format for math! Teaching Textbooks is as close as I've come. Even with TT, she gets frustrated when she gets a question wrong or doesn't understand it. But she is doing so much better and she's making forward progress.

 

About Apologia Science, I have lots of friends who used Apologia throughout high school, and their kids have done fine in college. Yes, even in their science classes. ;)

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What does your current high school student think about how her siblings have done? Has she absorbed any of the "what not to do if you want to keep your scholarship" tips?

 

 

I was careful when we looked at schools for our second dd. One reason amongst others that we passed up a private school was that their requirement to maintain the big scholarship was 3.5. I didn't want her to have that stress. She has a very nice scholarship at the school she chose with a 3.0 requirement- far less stressful! So far, she seems to be doing well enough to keep it.

 

 

Good point on the scholarship. My daughter would like to go to the same college as her older sister, but she does not want the same scholarship. She wants the lesser scholarship because you can keep with a lower GPA. I don't know if you can turn down one scholarship and ask for a lesser one though. If her ACT comes up one point then she will be offered the big one, unless I fiddle with her transcript and lower her GPA a bit, but that seems so dishonest.

 

As to how she feels about her siblings, she knows her older brother goofed off a good bit. He was also too young, we graduated him early and we should not have done that. Her sister, however, is very studious and the fact that her sister is struggling really scares my daughter. And this daughter tends to be easily stressed out anyway. So, that may be what led me to wake up at four in the morning in a panic, dd was in a panic last night and it probably rubbed off on me.

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Good point on the scholarship. My daughter would like to go to the same college as her older sister, but she does not want the same scholarship. She wants the lesser scholarship because you can keep with a lower GPA. I don't know if you can turn down one scholarship and ask for a lesser one though. If her ACT comes up one point then she will be offered the big one, unless I fiddle with her transcript and lower her GPA a bit, but that seems so dishonest.

 

As to how she feels about her siblings, she knows her older brother goofed off a good bit. He was also too young, we graduated him early and we should not have done that. Her sister, however, is very studious and the fact that her sister is struggling really scares my daughter. And this daughter tends to be easily stressed out anyway. So, that may be what led me to wake up at four in the morning in a panic, dd was in a panic last night and it probably rubbed off on me.

 

Our children's panic does have a way of rubbing off on us!

 

Depending on the school, sometimes if the student starts out with the larger scholarship but doesn't qualify to keep it, they'll automatically get bumped into the lower scholarship that they would still qualify for rather than losing all scholarship money. Ask about that.

 

The soft skills required to negotiate the world of college is what trips up more students than anything else. Things like: taking notes during lecture, taking reading notes, reviewing them and distilling them into key points to be memorized, learning how to juggle deadlines, get up in the morning and actually GO to that 8am class, learning to consult with the professor when you're doing the work and still having difficulty, etc. I would suggest that reading some books that key in on those "soft skills" during the next year as well as taking a couple of dual-enrolled classes while she's still home might be helpful.

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But my older daughter scored a 31 and now her scholarship is hanging by a thread. I am not afraid that she can't get into college, I am afraid she will get there and find herself ill-prepare. It is one thing to get in to college, it is another to stay!:)

 

I think one thing that homeschooling done diligently teaches is *study skills*!!! Especially for the olders in the house that are being homeschooled (I worry more about the younger and how much 'hand holding' I do). The way you've always described this dd, she seems serious, hard-working, and focused. She doesn't strike me as the type to go off to college and get sidetracked.

 

You've done right by your girl. She's got so much volunteer and life experience, colleges are going to be clamoring for her - especially with that high ACT score. (If a 36 is perfect, then a 29 is pretty high!) And I think you've done an excellent job of preparing her for her major. Focusing on that for the next year will really help 'launch' her - not worrying about science and Latin, silly! You've had her in all sorts of activities that will serve her well later (debate club, right? And I seem to remember something about her going to the Capitol? Keep with this line of thinking!)

 

I'm glad some wise women have responded here, and my first thought at the troubles with the foreign language was to remember how well Jean in Wisc.'s dd did with SOS Spanish. That could be a solution to the language - and she could start on it now. Didn't Jean say her dd did only Spanish I & part of Spanish II, and then did well in the college classes (tested out of some, I believe)?

 

You're on the right track. No need to panic - just breathe and keep up the good work. I hope one day that my dd is doing as much and is as involved in the community, as hardworking, as yours.

 

I wonder if you're not also feeling a little extra pressure on yourself because you know this one is...special. Just one of those that you know is going to be a success, and *so much* is at stake. That's how I feel with mine that is in 8th grade now - she's so smart, so kind, such an all-around great person, with tons of potential and so much to offer the world, I don't want to fail her. It scares me to death sometimes, and I probably wouldn't have the confidence to try homeschooling her for high school if I hadn't actually seen for myself how the grass is sooo not green at the ps. That is what would really not serve this particular child. It's working well for my oldest, though - thanks to those great study skills she learned from being homeschooled for a decade! :D.

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