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elegantlion

self-employed, work, and high school

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I'm thinking and planning ahead and I'd like some input on how much you let your high schoolers work. My dh is a self-employed carpenter and in a few years dh is looking forward to having ds be able to work with him part time. We want ds to attend college and NOT end up in construction as his career, but we definitely want him to learn the craft and work ethic.

 

So how much do you let your high schoolers work? I've already told dh academics is first and in high school I'm sure we'll have a full day.

 

Also does how much income he makes factor into receiving financial aid for college?

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Also does how much income he makes factor into receiving financial aid for college?

 

 

I'll answer this question. Yes, it does. Your son's income and savings will factor heavily into how much aid he receives. Your own income and savings will also be a factor; however, they will be assessed at a much lower rate than those of your son.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I'm thinking and planning ahead and I'd like some input on how much you let your high schoolers work. My dh is a self-employed carpenter and in a few years dh is looking forward to having ds be able to work with him part time. We want ds to attend college and NOT end up in construction as his career, but we definitely want him to learn the craft and work ethic.

 

So how much do you let your high schoolers work? I've already told dh academics is first and in high school I'm sure we'll have a full day.

 

Also does how much income he makes factor into receiving financial aid for college?

 

OK...We did this once and plan on doing it again with ds 2. My dh is a self employed plumber/hvac technician. My son strted working for him whenhe was 14. I based my High School program for my son on a very rigorous Technical High School in NYC (Well actually Brooklyn, but you know what I mean.) Ds worked as a helper and is now pretty capable in the field at 18. he has certifications galore and finished an oil tech training course for adults when he was 17. is my son going to be a plumber...I doubtr it....BUT he can always make money and he understands (more or less) how to run a business.

 

In 9th grade he worked 16 hours a week in the field and schooled about 25 hours a week over a 45 week period.

In 10th he worked 25 hours a week and schooled 25 hours a week

In 11th the same.

In 12th he had enough credits to do the Oil Tech course the first semester and then took 2 CC classes and his GED in the spring while working about 30 hours a week.

 

During his 4 years in high school, he also swam competitively (he is not an olympian...but enjoyed his team) He also was getting an education in real life with his dad. There were and are some snafu's....Like they do have personality conflicts and ds is a very slow mover...dh is not...sigh.... There were some issues with employees who felt put off that a 16 year old might actually know more than them. They also resented having to work with the bosses son.

 

Ds is now taking a bit of a sabbatical from work and getting ready to start college full time in the fall. He will start out at the CC taking Engineering courses and then transfer to a 4 year SUNY school where he is planning to Major in Alternative Energy which is an Engineering Science BA program. I am sure his time in the field will help him to enter this program as he has already worked and is certified to work on heat pumps, Solar Energy and Geo-Thermal.

 

All-in-all, I think this training was very enriching and I think it will help him in anything he chooses to do career wise.

 

Ds #2 will do a similar type of program only his goals are a bit different, so his course work will be different. Ds would like to study law....so we will encourage that...and encourage him to be out in the field too as he may end up studying Environmental Law or some other type of business law. Learning how to run any business will give him tools to work within his career choices no matter what course he takes.

 

My dd will do a similar type of training...but she will be working close with me on the running the business end...bookkeeping, secreterial work etc.

 

Oh, in high school, we used WTM book lists, but we used mostly text book courses for my son. It needed to be pretty cut and dried...but that is his learning style.

Ds 2 started 9th grade this year. He worked 1 day a week (Monday) and schooled 5 days.(T-S) He finished up well. He will also be using mainly text books next year for 10th gradeand working 2 full days and schooling 4 days over 45 weeks instead of 5 days over 36 weeks...

 

HTH,

Faithe

HTH, Faithe

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Oh, about income levels...

Ds earned enough money over the 4 years to pay outright for 2 years of CC. Also, it may make sense to have your DS buy a car BEFORE applying for Financial Aid.

HTH,

Faithe

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I'll answer this question. Yes, it does. Your son's income and savings will factor heavily into how much aid he receives. Your own income and savings will also be a factor; however, they will be assessed at a much lower rate than those of your son.

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

Thank you. We haven't discussed how we will work his income yet, but I like to consider all options.

 

OK...We did this once and plan on doing it again with ds 2. My dh is a self employed plumber/hvac technician. My son strted working for him whenhe was 14. I based my High School program for my son on a very rigorous Technical High School in NYC (Well actually Brooklyn, but you know what I mean.) Ds worked as a helper and is now pretty capable in the field at 18. he has certifications galore and finished an oil tech training course for adults when he was 17. is my son going to be a plumber...I doubtr it....BUT he can always make money and he understands (more or less) how to run a business.

 

In 9th grade he worked 16 hours a week in the field and schooled about 25 hours a week over a 45 week period.

In 10th he worked 25 hours a week and schooled 25 hours a week

In 11th the same.

In 12th he had enough credits to do the Oil Tech course the first semester and then took 2 CC classes and his GED in the spring while working about 30 hours a week.

 

During his 4 years in high school, he also swam competitively (he is not an olympian...but enjoyed his team) He also was getting an education in real life with his dad. There were and are some snafu's....Like they do have personality conflicts and ds is a very slow mover...dh is not...sigh.... There were some issues with employees who felt put off that a 16 year old might actually know more than them. They also resented having to work with the bosses son.

 

Ds is now taking a bit of a sabbatical from work and getting ready to start college full time in the fall. He will start out at the CC taking Engineering courses and then transfer to a 4 year SUNY school where he is planning to Major in Alternative Energy which is an Engineering Science BA program. I am sure his time in the field will help him to enter this program as he has already worked and is certified to work on heat pumps, Solar Energy and Geo-Thermal.

 

All-in-all, I think this training was very enriching and I think it will help him in anything he chooses to do career wise.

 

Ds #2 will do a similar type of program only his goals are a bit different, so his course work will be different. Ds would like to study law....so we will encourage that...and encourage him to be out in the field too as he may end up studying Environmental Law or some other type of business law. Learning how to run any business will give him tools to work within his career choices no matter what course he takes.

 

My dd will do a similar type of training...but she will be working close with me on the running the business end...bookkeeping, secreterial work etc.

 

Oh, in high school, we used WTM book lists, but we used mostly text book courses for my son. It needed to be pretty cut and dried...but that is his learning style.

Ds 2 started 9th grade this year. He worked 1 day a week (Monday) and schooled 5 days.(T-S) He finished up well. He will also be using mainly text books next year for 10th gradeand working 2 full days and schooling 4 days over 45 weeks instead of 5 days over 36 weeks...

 

HTH,

Faithe

HTH, Faithe

 

Thanks for sharing your experience. I'm sure my dh and ds will have a few personality clashes. Dh doesn't have employees, just a few subs he uses pretty regularly.

 

Good info about the car too. If mine survives that long we plan on giving it to him, or letting him earn it probably.

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I found the book, "Paying for College Without Going Broke" by Kalman Chany to be helpful in understanding the world of financial aid. I was able to check it out of my library.

 

Money in the student's name and money in the parent's name is assessed differently during the aid process, so you might want to understand the aid process before he starts earning money.

 

I thought this quote was interesting, and it shows why it's important to understand the financial aid process before your child applies to college:

"You might think that the families who receive the most financial aid would be the families with the most need. In fact, this is not necessarily true. The people who receive the most aid are the people who best understand the aid process."

 

HTH,

Brenda

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