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Anyone familiar with the Rainbow Girls organization?

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My girlfriend sent me a link --- she is interested in having her daughter do this with my daughter (age 14) but I can't get a good feel for it from their website.

 

Anyone have daughters that are in this? Is it a good experience? What kind of community service projects do they do?

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It's a Mason thing. I would recommend you research Masons, Masonic Lodge, etc.. I would not allow my daughter to participate.

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My xstepdad was a Mason when I was in highschool so the rest of us were involved in all of the auxillaries. It is a service and leadership group for teenage girls but there is a huge amount of the whole masonic ritual and secret involved in it. Nothing bad but I quit as soon as I could and wouldn't have my kids involved in it.

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My greatgrandfather was a Master Mason and my mom was in Rainbow. She loved it. They took trips, did various volunteering activities and things like that. I was involved briefly. I didn't feel that it was anymore ritualistic than any Catholic mass I had been to. It just wasn't my cup of tea. I hated that I had to memorize stuff; I prefer Drama Club! :D

 

They have several groups. Eastern Star is the women's organization and Demolay (sp?) is the boy's organization.

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I was in Rainbows when I was a teen. Basically I remember lots of ceremonies, nothing all that alarming, just stuff to memorize and say as part of the ceremony. We also had to wear lots of formal dresses in the colors of the rainbow. I guess our group didn't do much because I remember a few small service projects and other than that just a lot of loooong ceremony meetings. I wasn't a strong Christian at that point, so I don't remember it conflicting with my spiritual beliefs. Which I expect I would now, since I am now a much more stringent evangelical Christian.

 

Honestly, I don't remember it affecting me much. I think the only reason I did it was because of a dear neighbor who was in the men's group who went to a lot of trouble to get me in. I think I only stuck with it about two years. There may be a whole deeper layer than I experienced, but that's my story...

Edited by hillfarm

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Investigate and see if it lines up with your beliefs. I was in Rainbow as a pre-teen/teenager and really wish I hadn't done it. There was nothing "wrong" with anything that we did, but from what I've sinced learned about the Masons, I wish I had no involvement whatsoever with them.

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I was in Rainbows as a girl and it was something that I now regret. As a child I didn't understand the relavance in the ceremonies and such but now as a parent the thought of it freaks me out. It is something that I would definitely NOT let my daughter participate in.

 

The meetings were very private. Even our parents were not allowed to enter when a ceremony was taking place. This in and of itself bothers me now as a parent. I guess I feel that anything that is deliberately kept from parents is something I don't want my children involved in. Rainbow definitely taught us to keep all things that happened there from everyone, including our parents. This is just disturbing to me now that I'm a mom.

 

My parents let me enter it because I don't think they really understood what it was but after a short time their suspicions were peaked. They pulled me out of it after about 1 year.

 

I personally wouldn't let my daughter do this. Just my $.02

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My experience was awesome with Rainbow Girls! Being in Rainbow changed me from a girl who wouldn't talk to anyone, never spoke up in class and was painfully shy to a girl who could give a word-perfect speech in front of hundreds of people (I was Grand Charity). I learned to interview, to walk with poise, to be involved in something that really changed my life. As a Christian the only thing that bothered me was one line that said that the rainbow was a symbol of God's promise to never again destroy the earth. Since that line was in my speech I always said (to myself), "...with water." ;) Aside from that I was fine with what I learned. Yes, it was 'secret' but that didn't bother me because my parents weren't involved in my life anyway. As a former Rainbow Girl I can attend meetings and plan to be fully involved if I get my dds involved.

 

Really, I'd say the crowning moment of my adolescent life was being at the Grand Assembly and giving one of the longest speeches before all the people present and receiving the top award for my station. I know I should be more concerned with the Masonic teachings, however my time in Rainbow Girls so changed me that I really want my dds to be in it, too.

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Rainbow Girls is an auxiliary group for a fraternal organization called the International Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.), not the Masons. The Masonic fraternity organization for girls is called Jobs Daughters and I was heavily involved -- even became Honored Queen of that particular group. Rainbow is another version of this, but again, it is I.O.O.F, not Masons. The ladies' auxiliary group for I.O.O.F. is called Rebekah, not Eastern Star. (ES is with the Masonic groups.)

 

I cannot speak for I.O.O.F., but I can for the Masonic groups. As an adult with a more mature walk in the Christian faith, I have to say I would never allow my dd to partake in any way. I regret my involvement and have renounced any and all ties to it. There is a strong link to the occult with Masonic organizations -- behind the scenes and symbolically in the ceremonies, especially as one moves up to the higher degrees. On the surface it seems harmless -- even a positive contribution to the community, but with correct discernment it is not spiritual in a good way. Many people scoff at this and don't believe the truth about it. I was even fooled about it for a very long time. So you have to pray about it and weigh it out for yourself.

 

What I read about I.O.O.F. online seems on the surface to be more Biblicaly based than Masonic groups, but I would still be very leary of secret fraternal organizations. Pray for wisdom in this.

 

My two cents fwiw.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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Rainbow Girls is an auxiliary group for a fraternal organization called the International Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.), not the Masons. The Masonic fraternity organization for girls is called Jobs Daughters and I was heavily involved -- even became Honored Queen of that particular group. Rainbow is another version of this, but again, it is I.O.O.F, not Masons. The ladies' auxiliary group for I.O.O.F. is called Rebekah, not Eastern Star. (ES is with the Masonic groups.)

 

The first line of the history section of the Rainbow Girls webpage:

"In 1922, Rainbow was created for young women whose fathers were members of the Masonic Lodge, and their friends."

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Thanks for all the replies. I had my hesitations with this and I don't think we will be doing it. Just doesn't sound like something for us.

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Rainbow Girls is an auxiliary group for a fraternal organization called the International Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.), not the Masons. The Masonic fraternity organization for girls is called Jobs Daughters and I was heavily involved -- even became Honored Queen of that particular group. Rainbow is another version of this, but again, it is I.O.O.F, not Masons. The ladies' auxiliary group for I.O.O.F. is called Rebekah, not Eastern Star. (ES is with the Masonic groups.)

 

I cannot speak for I.O.O.F., but I can for the Masonic groups. As an adult with a more mature walk in the Christian faith, I have to say I would never allow my dd to partake in any way. I regret my involvement and have renounced any and all ties to it. There is a strong link to the occult with Masonic organizations -- behind the scenes and symbolically in the ceremonies, especially as one moves up to the higher degrees. On the surface it seems harmless -- even a positive contribution to the community, but with correct discernment it is not spiritual in a good way. Many people scoff at this and don't believe the truth about it. I was even fooled about it for a very long time. So you have to pray about it and weigh it out for yourself.

 

What I read about I.O.O.F. online seems on the surface to be more Biblicaly based than Masonic groups, but I would still be very leary of secret fraternal organizations. Pray for wisdom in this.

 

My two cents fwiw.

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

Rainbow is or at least WAS Masonic. I come from a long line of mason/shriners/eastern star . Girls were in rainbow and boys were in Demolay. it had nothing to do with Odd Fellows. I had to get my uncles and my grandmother (Masons and Eastern Star) to sponsor me. It really is part of the Masonic order. I have actually never heard of Job's daughters, maybe there are regional differences and the names are just different??? No idea on that one...

 

Now, after saying that....I am now Catholic and would never let my daughter join Rainbow...I do remember those meetings as if they were yesterday...it was 35 years ago...

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I obviously wrong about the connection to I.O.O.F., but that had always been my understanding. Mea culpa! I completely apologize for stating this without complete research and knowledge.

 

I was in JD for five years and went "up the line" so to speak, my sis was in JD and my brother was also in DeMolay. We had to have a relative that was a Master Mason in order to join, which was our uncle. JD claims to be the only international fraternal organization with this requirement, but obviously by what some of you have stated Rainbow also has that requirement. Interesting...but in the big picture, not a point to argue I guess. I personally find these organizations to be scary. Good looking on the outside, but fundamentally way off at the core.

 

There were also Rainbow Girls in our region, but we had no association with them at all, yet we did have a lot of connections and joint activities with the DeMolay, Eastern Star and obviously Masons. There were numerous bethels (chapters) of JD all over our state and region here in the PNW.

 

It must be a regional thing then...

 

Blessings,

Lucinda

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My step-father is a Mason, was a Worshipful Master, and is now an Inspector. He's in - deep in, and we don't have anything to do with it as Christians. My dh has tried and tried to talk to him about it to no avail.

 

I completely agree that anything that is that secretive is just plain creepy and in this case demonic. Look up stories from people who have left the Masonic organization if you disagree.

 

Hey - what about Girl Scouts? Lots of community involvement there. I think it's a fantastic organization. It's NOT just for little girls. Older girls can still get involved and have all kind of opportunities.

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I honestly do not know where your are all getting your information from but not wanting your kids to join the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls unless your are against all religions is a huge mistake. Rainbow has taught me the value of self respect, patriotism, service. This organization  has nothing to do with the masonic religion so if you want information about rainbow girls look up International Order of the Rainbow for Girls. We only keep it a secret so that the girls can value the ritual.We are a sisterhood of girls from 11-21. Every meeting we open the bible as a sign or respect. We value all religions and allow not only the bible to be open but any book that supports one right living god (not demonic being). this year in Nebraska rainbow we are taking a trip  to the shriners hospital in Minnesota to donate plush toys to the children's ward. We value our service prodjects . Take this into consideration before you give it up entirely. 

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I belonged for several years to 2 assemblies (we moved). I began in 8th grade. There was never any mention of religion, other than God, and there were direct quotes from the bible - old testament, I believe. The tenets: Love, Religion (God, not christian), Nature, Immortality, Fidelity, Patriotism and Service. That, and Faith, Hope and Charity. They all led up to being a good person though these aspects. As to projects and community service, I was a Worthy Advisor (and did receive the Grand Cross) and was very active. In my term, we made toys and took them to the Shriner's hospital where, among other things, they treat badly burned children for free. We went to nursing homes and took treats, sang them songs from their generation, went at Christmas, sat and talked with them, etc. This wasn't just a benefit to the seniors - we learned a lot about what it's like to be in nursing homes and to age that most kids don't get. There was never any sense that this was a cult - more like adult supervised activities. You didn't have to be any more involved than you wanted to be. The girls voted (by a black ball system) on anybody nominated for membership, and a small group went to the girl's home and met with her and the parents in advance for two purposes: 1) to ascertain if she was of good moral character 2) to make certain the parents and the girl knew what was involved and answer any questions. When the team reported to the membership, the vote then took place. Very seldom (I can't remember an incident) is anyone blackballed - and my understanding is that someone was only to be blackballed if they were of poor moral character - that is, in today's vernacular - dishonest, slutty, mean - that sort of thing. There was an aspect of memorizing "lessons" for each of the attributes (Love, Religion, Nature, etc.) that a girl undertook if she accepted appointment to an office. The purpose was two fold - it was meant that the girl at that station took the responsibility to "teach" the new girls coming in what the organization's perspective was on that aspect for the next term - for example patriotism, and the role that a woman plays in defending her country. (slightly outdated at this time, I might add, but appropriate for the period of time in which it was written). It also taught girls responsibility and presentation skills - they made a commitment and learned it, and then repeated it over the next months gaining a level of comfort in their presentations. Also - they were not obligated to accept an appointment - you can be a member without accepting an office. There were also elected offices, which implied more commitment, and time.The organizational and leadership skills learned as the girls (not their mothers) planned fundraisers, trips, meetings, installation events, community service events were very valuable. I think that in itself is important - when today parents undertake to do so much of what a kid should be learning, but fails to do because the parent is busy orchestrating. That all said, at the time there was one draw back, which I checked on a few years back and was told no longer exists. That is the barrier between black and white assemblies - I'm sure there's a more politically correct way to say it - but back in the 70's there was a barrier. The organization is supervised basically by Masons and Eastern Star members (men can be both). In our assembly we did have a petition for membership submitted, the committee went out, came back with a favorable recommendation, the girls voted for her to join. This decision was overruled by adults when the it was discovered she was an Afro-American, with the justificaiton that she had "her own" assembly . That no longer happens, and went the way of many of these types of things with the 70's and 80s. That is the only disturbing thing I ever saw, and several girls quit as a result. As I say, I checked a few years back, and that barrier no longer exists.

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I was in Rainbows as a girl and it was something that I now regret. As a child I didn't understand the relavance in the ceremonies and such but now as a parent the thought of it freaks me out. It is something that I would definitely NOT let my daughter participate in.

 

The meetings were very private. Even our parents were not allowed to enter when a ceremony was taking place. This in and of itself bothers me now as a parent. I guess I feel that anything that is deliberately kept from parents is something I don't want my children involved in. Rainbow definitely taught us to keep all things that happened there from everyone, including our parents. This is just disturbing to me now that I'm a mom.

 

My parents let me enter it because I don't think they really understood what it was but after a short time their suspicions were peaked. They pulled me out of it after about 1 year.

 

I personally wouldn't let my daughter do this. Just my $.02

 

 

Yes, the meetings are private, however, parents are highly encouraged to attend. They opt parents to be there so there are adult supervision and more people to guide the girls. Maybe the assembly you were in didn't understand that concept very well.

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Rainbow is or at least WAS Masonic. I come from a long line of mason/shriners/eastern star . Girls were in rainbow and boys were in Demolay. it had nothing to do with Odd Fellows. I had to get my uncles and my grandmother (Masons and Eastern Star) to sponsor me. It really is part of the Masonic order. I have actually never heard of Job's daughters, maybe there are regional differences and the names are just different??? No idea on that one...

 

Now, after saying that....I am now Catholic and would never let my daughter join Rainbow...I do remember those meetings as if they were yesterday...it was 35 years ago...

 

What is wrong in joining Rainbow when you are Catholic?

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What is wrong in joining Rainbow when you are Catholic?

 I can answer that, but first you have to wait six years.

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Rainbow is or at least WAS Masonic. I come from a long line of mason/shriners/eastern star . Girls were in rainbow and boys were in Demolay. it had nothing to do with Odd Fellows. I had to get my uncles and my grandmother (Masons and Eastern Star) to sponsor me. It really is part of the Masonic order. I have actually never heard of Job's daughters, maybe there are regional differences and the names are just different??? No idea on that one...

 

 

Job's Daughters are required to be related to a Mason in good standing. Rainbow Girls can just be sponsored by a Mason. We had both Job's and Rainbow in the area where I grew up, along with Demolay (for guys), Eastern Star (for women) and Masons (for men). Job's Daughters always looked down on Rainbow girls.

 

I enjoyed my time in Job's Daughters and my sister really benefited even more growing in her leadership abilities there. I would have let my dd participate, but she was never even exposed to the concept - never had friends involved. If you are ok with the Masonic stuff - they are good organizations. If you are freaked by the Masonic stuff - stay away.

 

Sorry - didn't see the date on that.

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They might have to change their name - rainbow youth is a group for teenage homosexuals here.

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Yes, I was a Rainbow Girl. It was a great experience in my life. It taught me to be able to hold my head high and stand by what I believed in. It gives girls a chance to learn how to be a "good person." Some may think it is crazy but here's the thing. I was not as well back then as I am today on my personal relationship with God. But now I wish I would have fully understood what each station meant. It was kind of a race for me to memorize the ritual work. It made me feel great that I was able to learn the words. Only if I would have stopped and really thought what it was really about.

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I'm just dropping by to add a more recent experience of The International Order of the Rainbow for Girls, since it seems a lot of the testimonies here are from before the 90s. My experience was very positive, I thoroughly enjoyed my time as a Rainbow Girl. For reference, I joined in 1999 and reached Majority (Aged Out at 20) in 2008. Full disclosure, I am not Christian, I am actually Buddhist! :)

 

So much has been updated in the last two decades with Rainbow Girls. A lot of complaints I see here were that is was "secretive" and the teaching were "Not christian". You all are partially right. For one, Rainbow girls is a NON denominational group, meaning we do not require members to subscribe to any particular religion. Our members are Baptists, Mormon, Catholics, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and some fall somewhere in between. We don't turn away anyone because of their faith, we only require that they believe in a supreme being. As for the "Secrets", they don't exist. Sorry! Not sorry! We no longer use the word Secret in any of our ceremonies. All members of a girls family are welcome to come to our meetings, period. The book of ceremonies we use is readily available online for your perusal, as well as being available to check out at most state libraries, including the library of congress! WE ARE AN OPEN BOOK! :)

 

Our core teaching are based off of Christian Scripture, but we don't tell the girls they must accept Jesus into their heart, simply that they should exemplify his teachings, that of LOVE and KINDNESS. We also don't tell them that doing good and service in life is a guarantee into heaven. Rainbow does this because Christianity is an absolutely BEAUTIFUL religion and has amazing lessons that should be shared with all people. Jesus was an amazing teacher. All of these lessons were written be a Reverend, and the majority of them speak of Jesus, his teachings, or use scripture from the Holy Bible. As a buddhist, I found these teachings to be absolutely beautiful, and they are cardinal truths (Golden Rules) that I try to exemplify in my life as an adult. So is Rainbow a Cult? As someone who was in Rainbow, I honestly do not believe so. Cults have a pretty specific way of breaking down peoples beliefs and replacing them with their own, and Rainbow simply doesn't do that. It builds confidence in the girls so that they can use the lessons they learned in rainbow to be a better Christian, Jew, Catholic, or whatever their creed is.

 

The core lessons are this:

Red, Love - When you Love you are like God.

Orange, Religion -  Be religious, be apart of a faith that makes you a better person, and teaches Love and Service to others.

Yellow Nature - There are many places that you can worship, and nature is one of them.

Green, Immortality - This core lesson teaches that girls should be aware of their mortality as well as their soul's immortality.

Blue, Fidelity - Be true to your word, be true to your parents, show your fidelity in action, word and deeds.

Indigo, Patriotism - This lesson emphasizes that Pride and patriotism to your country and its flag, and the willingness to lay down your life in its defense, are important to life as an American, as well as respecting those who serve or who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

and finally, Violet, Service - Be of some Service each day.

 

But Rainbow doesn't just teach these lessons. The motto for Rainbow is "Rainbow gets Girls ready for Life!" and as an adult who was active in Rainbow Girls from 11-20, I can tell you that I learned so many skills, not just theological teachings!

 

Some of the highlights of Rainbow are:

1. It's a girl-run organization! The GIRLS elect their own leaders. Those leaders go up a chain of leadership (Faith, Hope, Charity, Worthy Associate Advisor [VP], and Worthy Advisor [President]).

2. The President (Worthy Advisor) creates a term plan, learns to delegate responsibility, and runs the business meetings.

3. The business meetings are run using  "Roberts Rules of Order", and the girls learn this method without thinking about it! Its come in handy for me as an adult.

4. Girls gain confidence by learning memorization parts, and then reciting those parts.

5. Girls learn how to create a budget.

6. Girl are expected to follow dress codes that teach them how to dress for various situations, like fun/casual events, business attire events, and formal events, so that when they become and adult and enter the work force, they already have experience in dressing to impress.

7. Unlike other groups, Rainbow does not separate the "little girls" from the "big girls". The members are mixed in together, which allows the little girls to have mentors and roll models, and for the big girls to gain leadership skills.

8. Girls learn about self-care, self esteem, recognizing bullying and abuse, leadership skills, public speaking, social media precautions and respect.

9. Girls also learn appropriate conversation topics. Oversharing is an issue in the world now a days thanks to social media, I'm sure we've all seen that 15 year old who takes selfies with their parents empty beer bottles. We have a saying, "Boyfriends come last" which is a reminder to girls to keep their focus while at Rainbow events. It also really cuts down on drama!

10. THE DRESSES ARE FUN AND I DONT CARE WHAT ANYONE SAYS. There is nothing quite as exhilarating as floating across the floor in a gorgeous hoop dress!

11. Girls are encouraged to do service that is important to them! We have 2 six-month terms a year, and the Worthy Advisor gets to pick their service project. National Childrens Cancer Society, Food banks, Diabetes Dogs, Guide Dogs for the Blind, Hospitals, Toys for Tots, specific research groups for illnesses... it all depends on what is important to the girls.

12. We tell our girls to ask their parents questions if they don't understand the meaning of the work they are memorizing. It was written almost 100 years ago by an old man, so there are some great SAT words in the memorization work that we just don't use any more! Like Solemnity, Exemplify, Manifestation, and Benediction. The work has also been updated in the last 20 years to reflect the times, like the fact that WOMEN and Men serve our country in the armed forces.

 

As for the Adults:

1. Adults who volunteer are usually parents or legal guardians, grandparents, aunts/uncles, past Rainbow Girls, or affiliated with some other Masonic group.

2. All adult volunteers are REQUIRED to go through a Background Check, be finger printed by the Police, pay a fee towards an insurance policy to protect girls and adults, and attend a mandatory Adult Worker training to learn about being a mandated reporter, recognizing the signs of abuse, drugs and other issues.

3. There are strict adult to girl ratios to make sure that members are properly chaperoned.

4. There are strict rules about how adults and girls can interact, including that no adults go into the girls designated dressing room, that men can not chaperone one-on-one with any girl who is not in their immediate family, and so on.

5. All family members are ALWAYS WELCOME to every rainbow meeting and function. There are no secrets in Rainbow. We will gladly hand you our book of ceremony so you can read through and ask questions about the memorization work and its meanings.

6. In fact, YOU as a non-parent who are interested in learning more are ALWAYS welcome to all meetings and events!

 

 

I really don't understand where people are getting these ideas that these teachings don't align with Christianity or offends their relationship with God. I was raised Christian, I understand the teachings. The lessons are beautifully written and are easy to digest for young adults, teaching complex ideas simplistically. Love thy neighbor, Have Faith, Respect Nature, Cherish your Soul and Life on earth, Be true to your word, Respect the Flag and your country, and Be of Service. These are all teachings I want my children to learn and project to the world when they grow up. The fact that they also will learn a plethora of other skills that will help them as adults, as well as make lasting friendships like I did, is an added bonus!

 

Rainbow also gave me the confidence I needed to be a leader in the work force, I already had so many leadership skills from my time as a Worthy Advisor, that I felt comfortable taking the lead at work. It was definitely a confidence boost to be the youngest manager at my grocery store job, and be really good at what I did! All I can say is I hope any parents who are considering Rainbow for their daughters actually MEET with Assembly they are interested in, talk to its members, go to some of the events, and get a feel for what Rainbow is IN PERSON! Trust your own gut! Is Rainbow for everyone? No. Some people don't like the amount of effort needed to be in rainbow. The memorization work. The leadership responsibilities, etc. Some people just want to get badges for learning how to tie a knot, and thats okay. But for girls who want to gain more, do more, experience more, Rainbow is wonderful!

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It's a Mason thing. I would recommend you research Masons, Masonic Lodge, etc.. I would not allow my daughter to participate.

I'm sorry but i am a rainbow girl and have been for 4 years now and i don't know what you think it is but it has helped me through so much. i highly recommend anyone joining it. it teaches you how to speak in front of people and give you confidence along with life long friends. i trust my friends from Rainbow more than any of my other friends. so to anyone who thinks it is a "colt" or some other crazy thought like that its not sure we might have a ritual but when it was founded by Revrend W. Mark Sexson that was a normal thing to hear. you also gain experience with volunteer work. one lat thing is that since we are funded by the masonic lodges they give out scholorships to girls gong into college. so don't judge if you don't know anything about it or your friends tell you something 

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What is wrong in joining Rainbow when you are Catholic?

if you were to get into rainbow and were catholic nobody would treat you different. i am in rainbow girls and we have girls that are in all different religions. Rainbow girls is a lot more accepting then it use to be. 

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My step-father is a Mason, was a Worshipful Master, and is now an Inspector. He's in - deep in, and we don't have anything to do with it as Christians. My dh has tried and tried to talk to him about it to no avail.

 

I completely agree that anything that is that secretive is just plain creepy and in this case demonic. Look up stories from people who have left the Masonic organization if you disagree.

 

Hey - what about Girl Scouts? Lots of community involvement there. I think it's a fantastic organization. It's NOT just for little girls. Older girls can still get involved and have all kind of opportunities.

Rainbow girls is a great organization. i have been in it a little bit over 4 years. Yes sure we have involvement with the masoniclodges but were totally different there is nothing secretive about it. you can find what we talk about in the meetings online from the rituals there is nothing to do with demons or the devil. i am offended that you could think this.

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My girlfriend sent me a link --- she is interested in having her daughter do this with my daughter (age 14) but I can't get a good feel for it from their website.

 

Anyone have daughters that are in this? Is it a good experience? What kind of community service projects do they do?

i am i rainbow girls and if you have any questions about the organization just email me aneessafranklin21@gmail.com

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