Jump to content

Menu

Wanted: opinions based on experience with Accutane, Retin-a, antibiotics for acne.


Guest Virginia Dawn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Virginia Dawn

Ds 15yo is in a bad way. He saw a doctor today and she is making an appointment with a dermatologist in the morning. She says he will need strong medicine. I am very concerned about side effects but I also want to help my ds get past this. He has tried the pro-activ type stuff and other over the counter acne products, it irritated his skin.

 

Right now he is washing with soap for sensitive skin and using witch hazel as an astringent, daily, his face twice a day. He also is soaking in epsom salts a couple of days a week. This seems to help it from getting worse, but his back is scabby and that makes it very difficult. A shower rips off the scabs and baths are gentler but make his back a gooey mess.

 

I feel so bad for the kid. But I'm also worried about the medications they may want him to take. It feels like we are stuck between a rock and a hard place.

 

The doc says if he can't get the appointment for within the next 2 weeks, she wants him to be on an antibiotic til he can be seen, up to a month or more. Is this worth it?

 

Then what about the medicines the dermatologist might prescribe, I've heard horror stories about permanent side effects like joint pain.

 

Does anyone have any experience with this? suggestions? Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kacifl

First it was Pro-active, then a doc put her on an antibiotic and the ointment, Differn. Didn't work, after a year Went to a different dr. and he put her on an antibiotic (has been on it for six months) and the ointment, Differn. It still isn't working. I asked about Acutane but Dr. said he'll never prescribe Acutane as there is a concern that it could cause suicidal tendencies.

 

I started looking into food allergies. Found out that allergies to milk can cause an increase in Testosterone. So I took her off all milk products in hope that this may clear her skin. Her acne is a dry kind, but with a lot of red skin. She has it on her shoulders, too. The redness cleared up in about three days. It has been two weeks since she stopped milk products....waiting for the acne to clear up.

 

We have her scheduled to see a third dermatologist in about two weeks.

Edited by kacifl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

and decided against it. You have to sign a bunch of paperwork saying you understand all the side effects....that alone was enough for me to run from it, LOL.

 

Have you tried plain hydrogen peroxide? That seemed to help my son....and eventually he grew out of it with no scars....

 

Tammy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My ds has only had a bad bout of acne twice. Once, the doc put him on Accutane, and the other time put him on antibiotics and Accutane. The time with the antibiotics was due to the fact that some were really red and some were painful. Both times they cleared up quickly. He has friends who had theirs treated with nothing but over the counter stuff, they still have bad acne. I think it is important to get it under control and keep it under control. I am not for medicating everything and prefer more natural approaches, but it was important for my son. I was very skeptical about antibiotics for acne, but it was just what he needed at the time. It helped that I trust my family doctor, and he know how we feel about medications.

 

Go cautiously, but the recommendations don't sound unusual from what we have experienced.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually antibiotics are prescribed for more cystic acne, the kind that is painful red lumps. It is typically taken only during an outbreak.

Two of my sisters have had accutane prescribed for them, and as far as I know they have not had any side effects. I also do not think they needed it (they didn't even have "noticeable" acne to me). I've never wanted to take it myself, so I don't know too much about side effects. It can cause birth defects, which wouldn't be a problem in your ds case ;).

I have rosacea acne and use a medicated sulfur acne treatment. I also have extremely sensitive skin and I find Noxema to work well as a cleanser.

I guess talk with the Dermatologist if there are any other options besides the Accutane. It sounds like she thinks he will need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My impression is that doctors (here at least) would exhaust all other options before going to Accutane, so if you haven't tried antibiotics yet, they might be worth a go before considering Accutane. However, the people I know who tried Accutane, after unsuccessfully trying everything else including antibiotics, were glad they took it since it turned out to be the only thing that worked.

 

Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used tetracyclene for about 10 years--15yo to 25yo. It did a pretty good job controlling my acne, although I did go on a cycle of Accutane in around 1994 because it was thought that it could effect a cure (it didn't). When I finally stopped taking antibiotics in 1995, my acne came back a bit, but nothing too horrible. Of course, I grew out of it eventually (I'm now 38). I never experienced any side effects from medication, but I was closely monitored while on Accutane. If a child of mine has acne like I did, I would be very comfortable with her/him going on an antibiotic, but I don't think I would go for the Accutane unless it was a last resort, and even then I'd need to do a lot of research. Good luck figuring out a solution--acne stinks!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are gaining some control over the situation with Retin-a and Differn. Accutane has been rejected by me because of the side effects, and by my daughter because it would make her ineligible to donate blood and being a regular donor is very important to her. The Retin-a/Differn combo did not work fast, but she kept at it and things are looking much better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son has done two rounds of Accutane and it is the best thing we ever did for him (well besides home school ;)). The only side effect was chapped lips and somewhat dry skin. The first time around we jumped through all kinds of hoops but for males they have made things a little easier lately. He finished the second round about a year ago. The doctor generally does want to exhaust other remedies first and you have to find a doctor (we had a referral from our GP) that has a license to prescribe Accutane - not all do because of all of the baggage associated with it. You do have to go in once a month and get a blood test done and the Dr. has to have the results before he can write the next months prescription and you have to fill the prescription within so many days, blah blah blah so it is sometimes logistically a little annoying but it was so worth it. I am so happy for my son and his self-esteem. His acne is completely gone. I realize everyone reacts differently and there could be side affects for your son but we know 4 people who have been on it and none of them had any problems.

 

My daughter on the other hand had cystic acne on her cheeks and the Dr. will not prescribe Accutane for her. He doesn't think the risks are worth it and her acne was not bad enough. He put her on an antibiotic that caused really severe problems for her - temporary but terrifying, like loss of vision. I wish I could remember the name of the antibiotic but it is a common one and she ended up with an extreme case of every side effect listed. They told her she could try again but for her it wasn't worth it so she just lived with the acne and used topicals. She is scrupulous about gently cleaning her face twice a day, using benzoyl peroxide and she was using Differin in the morning and some other topical at night but she is out of school and therefore off our insurance so $200 per tube was a little pricey for topical medication, so she is even off of that. The topicals got it under control though and then she has mostly outgrown it as her hormones have settled in.

 

Honestly, I would rather deal with the side effects of Accutane, which are very closely monitored by your doctor, then years on a low dose antibiotic.

 

Hydrogen peroxide breaks down your skin and shouldn't be used for long periods of time and witch hazel contains a lot of alcohol which is also very damaging and harsh on your skin. I would stick with a gentle, fragrance free cleanser and benzoyl peroxide, as strong as you can stand without to much irritation, and weirdly, a very light moisturizer to counteract the dryness and redness from the benzoyl peroxide. Watching your diet certainly doesn't hurt but didn't do anything for us. And we have heard arguments both ways about ultraviolet light - it helps, it doesn't.

 

Sorry about your sons suffering. It is hard enough to be a teen-age boy without having to deal with acne.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used Accutane around age 20 & it was one of the best things I've done. My situation wasn't nearly as bad as your son's sounds, but it was worth it for me.

 

If I had a 17 yo who wanted to use it knowing the potential risks and side effects, I would absolutely let him/her use it. No doubt about it. It can change a young person's feeling about himself and that can change his life.

 

yvonne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just over a month ago. I got that middle age acne which leaves pits and scars. It was just maddening after being clear and having nice skin for years. It took me a full month to stop breakouts. The dermatologist I went to told me that nothing topical can work for certain types of acne, one has to go straight to meds. I am on tetracyclene and although it is not as freaky as accutane, it can cause birth defects. The oddest side effect I read on the label was a black hairy tongue (ewwww).

 

My next step is to have some work done. I am not sure if that is prescription lightening creams, laser treatments, or chemical peels.

 

I was told it could be a long while such as a year or two. I do know that antibiotics stain the teeth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 16 yo dd has had increasingly severe headaches since Dec, when she started a low dose antibiotic for acne. The 'biotic helped her acne and we never connected it with her headaches.

 

The neurologist we saw said that some antibiotics can cause ocular edema, which in turn causes headaches. She's been off it two weeks now with some relief of her headaches. It's too soon to know if that is the primary cause of her headaches.

 

n

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The common treatments we see in the pharmacy for acne are:

 

Starting with topicals:

Benzamyacin, Benzaclin, Duac or clindamycin gels/creams are very common and very effective treatments. These have a drying agent like benzoyl peroxide and and antibiotic to fight the infection.

 

Differin or Retin A are used to help slough off the upper most surface of the skin cells. Some people skin doesn't slough fast enough which sometimes clog the pores and cause the acne. It can also help to get rid of damaged layers and to speed up the new healthy layers of skin to grow.

 

Face washes like Plexion are great to clean the skin and to help give it an antibiotic 'rinse'.

 

Orals:

 

Low dose antibiotics are Very common treatments for acne. The most common side effect is nausea, and most other reactions are related to allergic reactions (not common). Tetracycline, clindamycin and Minocycline (Minocin and Adoxa) are very, very common acne meds. If there are allergies to these meds we also see ampicillin, penicillin or amoxicillin, but these are not as good at treating acne so are rarely used. Getting the infection under control is very important in acne treatment. Oral antibiotics are the fastest and most effective way to achieve this.

 

Accutane is reserved for acne that doesn't respond too traditional treatments. It is a vitamin A derivative and is very drying to the skin. It has a bad reputation for side effects and I wouldn't use it as a fist line treatment in most cases, but it really sounds like you son is in very bad shape. I wouldn't be surprised to hear the doctor talk about it being an option down the road. Research it thoroughly before you use it. I would be less concerned with a home school kid using it, than a kid away at college because you are there to monitor the child and the side effects. You can stop it if you decide it is needed. I wouldn't allow my son or dd to use it unless absolutely necessary, but with a good knowledge of what to watch for as far as side effects, I would consider it under certain conditions.

 

I would expect the doctor to start him on the first 4 things I mentioned and if those fail, to discuss the accutane.

 

I personally use Plexion face wash, Duac gel, Differin and oral antibiotics to keep my face clear. I am very, very sensitive to medications and don't like to use them, but I find they are necessary for me. Ds14 uses Duac and it makes a big difference in his skin.

 

I wouldn't hesitate to have my son try items from the first 4 things I suggested, the Accutane would be a harder sell.

 

If the dermatologist offers you samples, try those and see what a difference they make. A little bit can go a long way and if you find the right combination, the results can be dramatic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been on anti-biotics, benzoyl peroxide, Retin-A, glycolic peels, and three rounds of Accutane.

 

I have had cystic acne since I hit puberty. I was on accutane once before I was married, and twice afterwards. The second round did wonders, the third round didn't really make any difference, but having my face burnt off (it was an alternating plan of Retin-A and glycolic acid) got rid of a lot of the pits that were "re-filling".

 

I have had 3 dermatologists tell me that topicals don't do jack for cystic acne, as it is an inherited condition. That is why Accutane works: it destroys the cysts at a cellular level. Heck, I can put petroleum derivatives on my face and they don't break me out!

 

My son is now getting cysts (on top of "basic" acne). He has been on low dose Sulpha for 2 years, but is burning out on it. Life is worse w/o it, but it is definitely no longer controlling things. He is going to a new dermatologist, and I will be asking about Accutane. I don't want him to deal with the horribleness I dealt with (I actually had cysts breaking beneath my skin on my face and giving me black eyes, and so bad on my back that I couldn't sit in a chair).

 

 

asta

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The dermatologist will likely start with something topical. My son was put on the Retin-A Micro pump, .04%. That really hasn't made a difference at all in the past 8 weeks, so we went back yesterday and the doc prescribed the 1% Retin-A Micro Pump and a low dose of Minocyclin (oral antibiotic).

 

Accutane is a drug of last resort. Don't even waste your time worrying about it at this point...it's not likely to be something your doc will start with. The topicals and low-dose antibiotics are the first step. Your child's self-esteem and scarring are something to worry about. Do what you need to do, and talk to your pharmacist if you have concerns about the meds.

 

Ria

Edited by Ria
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned that accutane can change a person's life. I know she was meaning that it can change a person's life for the better, but it can also change a life for the worse, hence ALL of the warnings. My daughter's dermatologist recommended putting her on Accutane (and her acne isn't THAT bad, just very persistent) and I said "no way". She would have had to take pregnancy tests and a bunch of other tests, before, during and after. I just couldn't see putting my teenaged daugther (or son, if I had one) on an antibiotic that is that intense. Something just isn't right about that drug. Yes, it is a miracle worker in that it clears up the acne but what other havoc is it causing in their young bodies? Obviously something othewise there wouldn't be so many precautions about the drug.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Virginia Dawn
The common treatments we see in the pharmacy for acne are:

 

Starting with topicals:

Benzamyacin, Benzaclin, Duac or clindamycin gels/creams are very common and very effective treatments. These have a drying agent like benzoyl peroxide and and antibiotic to fight the infection.

 

Differin or Retin A are used to help slough off the upper most surface of the skin cells. Some people skin doesn't slough fast enough which sometimes clog the pores and cause the acne. It can also help to get rid of damaged layers and to speed up the new healthy layers of skin to grow.

 

Face washes like Plexion are great to clean the skin and to help give it an antibiotic 'rinse'.

 

Orals:

 

Low dose antibiotics are Very common treatments for acne. The most common side effect is nausea, and most other reactions are related to allergic reactions (not common). Tetracycline, clindamycin and Minocycline (Minocin and Adoxa) are very, very common acne meds. If there are allergies to these meds we also see ampicillin, penicillin or amoxicillin, but these are not as good at treating acne so are rarely used. Getting the infection under control is very important in acne treatment. Oral antibiotics are the fastest and most effective way to achieve this.

 

Accutane is reserved for acne that doesn't respond too traditional treatments. It is a vitamin A derivative and is very drying to the skin. It has a bad reputation for side effects and I wouldn't use it as a fist line treatment in most cases, but it really sounds like you son is in very bad shape. I wouldn't be surprised to hear the doctor talk about it being an option down the road. Research it thoroughly before you use it. I would be less concerned with a home school kid using it, than a kid away at college because you are there to monitor the child and the side effects. You can stop it if you decide it is needed. I wouldn't allow my son or dd to use it unless absolutely necessary, but with a good knowledge of what to watch for as far as side effects, I would consider it under certain conditions.

 

I would expect the doctor to start him on the first 4 things I mentioned and if those fail, to discuss the accutane.

 

I personally use Plexion face wash, Duac gel, Differin and oral antibiotics to keep my face clear. I am very, very sensitive to medications and don't like to use them, but I find they are necessary for me. Ds14 uses Duac and it makes a big difference in his skin.

 

I wouldn't hesitate to have my son try items from the first 4 things I suggested, the Accutane would be a harder sell.

 

If the dermatologist offers you samples, try those and see what a difference they make. A little bit can go a long way and if you find the right combination, the results can be dramatic.

 

Thank you for this. And thanks to everyone else. I feel much better informed.

 

I never had acne, just the occasional hormonal zit on my nose or chin. Dh had it badly on his face when he was a teen, but it cleared up by 20. My two older kids had it in varying degrees but neither one as bad as this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used antibiotics for a time....it didn't help. I had severe cystic acne on my face, especially my jawline.

 

Oddly, here's what has helped....NO cleansers.

 

I scrub my skin with a wet washcloth in the shower, and sometimes at night before bed (especially my face where it's the worst) I only use soap of any kind under my arms, and the nether regions. If I use any sort of soap/body wash I break out. I even have to be careful about which shampoos I use. Going to no soap keeps it all down to small 'normal' zits occasionally. The cysts are gone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used antibiotics for a time....it didn't help. I had severe cystic acne on my face, especially my jawline.

 

Oddly, here's what has helped....NO cleansers.

 

I scrub my skin with a wet washcloth in the shower, and sometimes at night before bed (especially my face where it's the worst) I only use soap of any kind under my arms, and the nether regions. If I use any sort of soap/body wash I break out. I even have to be careful about which shampoos I use. Going to no soap keeps it all down to small 'normal' zits occasionally. The cysts are gone.

 

I just learned this lesson this year. And you're right - no more break outs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However' date=' the people I know who tried Accutane, after unsuccessfully trying everything else including antibiotics, were glad they took it since it turned out to be the only thing that worked.

[/quote']

 

This was my experience as a teen. I had tried anti-biotics and Retin-A with unimpressive results. Accutane worked. I was only on it for a short time, and suffered no ill effects (other than painfully dry lips and hands while I was on it, but I quickly recovered). I have talked to one person whose doctor believes that her liver damage is due to the Accutane she took as a teen, but she was on it for much longer than I was. So I think a short course is probably fine IF you've exhausted other options.

 

But I would try the others first. If the doc wants to go with anti-biotics, I would just encourage you to make sure he eats lots of yogurt or other lacto-fermented foods and/or takes a probiotic supplement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My ds used Accutane and it made a huge difference. My sister used it way back and had no side effects. Accutane is very controlled. You must register to get the prescription, fill the prescription within 6 or so days, no refills, sign lots of paprework. BUT, that's primarily because there is a definite link between birth defectcs and accutane. This does not affect males, so that was one less concern as I researched. I wouldn't take accutane for a mild case, but for a severe case, accutane may be the only real help.

 

HTH,

Lisa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've struggled with acne for the past 4 or 5 years (I'm 40). I've tried all of the OTC topical medications - they did nothing but irritate my skin. Two years ago, I went through several rounds of different antibiotics, but they upset my stomach so much that I had to quit taking them. I chose not to use Accutane because of the side effects. I'm now using Retin-A and my skin is finally clearing up. No more nasty, pus-filled pimples and the huge acne cysts are all but gone (I get one two or three times a year instead of two or three times a month). I've also noticed that acne scars are fading, which is a boost to my self-esteem, too.

 

I have to be diligent about using a sunscreen and my skin is a bit more sensitive, but I'm very happy with the results. If you chose to use Retin-A, know that it can take up to 3 months to see results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

took accutane as a teen and it did help at the time but he still had break-outs throughout his 20's & 30's.

 

We finally figured out he can't tolerate dairy. He doesn't have any gastro effects from it but if he starts drinking dairy, he starts breaking out.

 

You may have already considered food "allergies" but I thought I'd mention it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finally, just recently went to the dr. for adult acne (not severe, but persistent) that I have dealt with for at least ten years. He prescribed Clindamyacin. I am kicking myself that I didn't go the doctor route sooner. My skin is 100% perfect, not even a tiny, pin-head zit. I simply cannot believe the solution was so simple.

 

This probably will not be true for your son; severe acne is not easily cleared up. But I would second what others have said about Accutane. My SIL and her daughter have both had a round of Accutane and it cleared their severe acne 100%. I am not a devoted fan of drugs, especially "big-deal" drugs like Accutane, but if my child had cystic acne and other remedies were not working, I would definitely, certainly try Accutane.

 

Even moderate acne has a negative effect on your self-image and social life. IMO, every person deserves an attempt at clear skin, even if it involves prescriptions and medical treatment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dh ran the gamut of acne treatments when he was a teen. He eventually used Accutane when he was about 19yo. It literally cured him. Not a spot of acne since. No scars. Nothing. It changed his life!

 

Same here. It literally cured me & it had a tremendous impact on my life... for the better!

 

Regarding a pp's comment about it possibly changing one's life for the worse.... Yes, there are many precautions and warnings about Accutane. That's why, although it is highly successful, it isn't the first treatment used for acne. There are a lot of drugs with a lot of precautions, but that doesn't mean one should not take them. For some kids, the benefits outweigh the risks. My mother would not have let me take Accutane, but as soon as I heard about it on my own, I asked for it. I really, really wish she'd told me about it & let me use it in high school.

 

I think a lot of the concerns about girls using it center on the possibility of the girl getting pregnant and the effect of Accutane on the fetus. If the girl is not going to get pregnant, there's a lot less to worry about. I _knew_ for a fact that there was no way I was going to get pregnant (short of rape) so I wasn't worried much. I had no side effects & was completely "cured" after one series with Accutane.

 

If acne is an issue for any of my children when they're a teen, and they want to use Accutane, knowing the risks and precautions, I will completely support them in using it.

yvonne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned that accutane can change a person's life. I know she was meaning that it can change a person's life for the better, but it can also change a life for the worse, hence ALL of the warnings. My daughter's dermatologist recommended putting her on Accutane (and her acne isn't THAT bad, just very persistent) and I said "no way". She would have had to take pregnancy tests and a bunch of other tests, before, during and after. I just couldn't see putting my teenaged daugther (or son, if I had one) on an antibiotic that is that intense. Something just isn't right about that drug. Yes, it is a miracle worker in that it clears up the acne but what other havoc is it causing in their young bodies? Obviously something othewise there wouldn't be so many precautions about the drug.

 

Accutane is not an antibiotic; in fact, it was first used as a chemotherapy drug (and I believe it still is used to fight certain cancers and other conditions). It's a strong drug for a serious problem (cystic acne, not just regular acne). Sometimes people need such strong medications and the benefit is worth the potential risk.

 

Ria

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took Accutane at age 22 because I just wanted to be done with the acne and it worked very well for me. Obviously it had no long-term effects on my fertility and did not on my health either. My oldest son took Accutane for a while and it worked well for him too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like my mom, I had acne as an adult in my 20's. My mom used oral antibotics and a topical antibiotic on her skin and it worked pretty well for her.

 

My drs. never prescribed oral antibiotics--I just saw family docs, not a derm. I don't know why they didn't, but I wish they'd have tried it. I did use the topical antiobiotic for years without much success.

 

Having acne as a young adult devastated me. I'm not talking a few pimples. It was painful and hideous to look at. I'm so glad I had a sweet loving husband who married me before my acne problems and never said a word about it when it cropped up.

 

I was very, very depressed and had terribly low self-esteem bec. of the acne, so it's something I take pretty seriously. It prevented me from trying new things, talking to people, applying for certain jobs, going certain places. I would have tried anything drs. prescribed and wish someone would have offered accutane. My skin did scar, but miraculously not so bad. It's hardly noticable.

 

Anyway, eventually I got a script for Retin-A. It did help, but was not a cure by any means. I still had acne, just less of it. But less counts, so I used it for years. I think the Retin-A helped with the scarring issue, but that's just my feeling, I'm not sure.

 

It made my face very, very red. And very, very peely-dry. Not too cute. I had to stay out of the sun or I'd burn to a crisp. My face hurt all the time and I was extremely self-conscious. It also cost a fortune bec. insurance didn't cover it.

 

And I still got acne, just not as much.

 

I had to use a very gentle soap. None of the acne soaps had worked for me in the past, so this was a welcome relief.

 

What helped me the most was trying Stridex for sensitive skin (low-dose) under the Retin-A, or maybe it was at different times of the day, I don't remember. That helped slough off the skin and finally cleared up the acne more. I still had the redness, but noticably less acne and clogged pores. I didn't have to use as much Retin-A so my face hurt less.

 

When I was in my late 20's, I decided to go off Retin-A and try Pro-Active. It worked like nothing else ever did. I don't know why it worked so well, but I was thankful. It was life-changing for me. It's too bad it hasn't worked for your ds.

 

My acne disappeared after I had my ds when I was 30. Hormones? I don't know. I did begin a much better lifestyle. I slept regularly, didn't stay up all night cramming for college (I graduated at 30), didn't drink coffee by the pot and a ton of diet coke. Diet, sleep, and a lot less stress may have played a role in helping my skin.

 

I hope your ds finds something to help him soon.

Edited by CactusPair
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my 20's I had cystic acne that just kept coming back. My doctor prescribed a quarter of usual dose of accutane for about 6 months and it was a miracle for me. The acne went away and never came back and that was 20 years ago. I definitely would not rule out accutane. My understanding is that the biggest risk is accidental pregnancy and accutance which is why they have strict precautions.

 

I hope this helps.:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

make sure you research side effects. "Vision" related side effects is a benign term for a very dangerous side effect. Our 17 year-old has been taking minocycline for several months, and recently began having severe headaches and double vision in one eye. She has swelling of the optic nerve, caused by swelling of the brain. After much research of online medical journals, I found MANY articles on people getting Pseudotumor cerebri (aka intercranial hypertension) with vision side effects. We see a neurologist on Friday, so I will have more feedback on my "theory".

 

I'm not trying to scare anyone. I just hope to spare anyone the horror of going through this. Please pray for us if we come to mind. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But part of it may be that he has extremely sensative skin. When I was right out of college and finally had the insurance and $$$ to see a really good dermatologist, he worked with me and the only cleanser I could use was Cetaphil and any astringent or peroxide product actually made me worse. I finally did nothing but Cetaphil cleanser with a light coating of Cetaphil moisturizer (yes, moisturizer) to "seal" the skin and to help it heal. Eventually I did do Accutane, but I learned the in the process that all the standard acne treatments were a disaster for me.

 

Just an idea...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use Retin-A Micro and it works well for me. When I quit using it I get nasty pimples along my jawline and on my neck. Initially it does cause redness and dry skin but it's not too bad if I am careful to avoid the eye area and the corners of my nose. I have to wear sunscreen all the time though, this cream makes your skin especially sensitive to sunlight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Virginia Dawn
I used antibiotics for a time....it didn't help. I had severe cystic acne on my face, especially my jawline.

 

Oddly, here's what has helped....NO cleansers.

 

I scrub my skin with a wet washcloth in the shower, and sometimes at night before bed (especially my face where it's the worst) I only use soap of any kind under my arms, and the nether regions. If I use any sort of soap/body wash I break out. I even have to be careful about which shampoos I use. Going to no soap keeps it all down to small 'normal' zits occasionally. The cysts are gone.

 

Thank You! Thank You! Thank You! The no soap route is working!

 

Ds's back looks So much better after just a few days of no soap. He's still soaking in epsom salts too. He's got an appt. with the dermatologist in 3 weeks. It actually looks as if the scabs on his back may be gone by then.

Fingers crossed. :)

 

Who would have guessed? It was Dove sensitive skin soap too, what a lot of websites recommend for those with acne.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank You! Thank You! Thank You! The no soap route is working!

 

Ds's back looks So much better after just a few days of no soap. He's still soaking in epsom salts too. He's got an appt. with the dermatologist in 3 weeks. It actually looks as if the scabs on his back may be gone by then.

Fingers crossed. :)

 

Who would have guessed? It was Dove sensitive skin soap too, what a lot of websites recommend for those with acne.

 

I'm SO glad it's helping! It seriously took me YEARS to figure that out. And I cannot use ANY of the soaps, even the sensitive skin ones. The least offensive to my skin was the cheap Jergens Pure and Natural...but they quit selling it. (Even that caused break outs) Dove is one of the worst...I think it's the moisturizers they put in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look at Dan Kern's website Acne.org.

 

There is a wealth of information on him and his story, including his experience with drug treatments, and he has a regimen which he developed through trial and error, using low-dose benzoyl peroxide, gentle moisturizer, AHA, and gentle cleanser. It's more information, at the least.

 

I totally agree about skipping soap. Commercial soaps are ALL made with detergents (sodium laurel sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and similar harsh chemicals) which is why they are so bad for the skin. Homemade soaps are much gentler on the skin (meaning soaps made with some kind of fat/oil and lye- the chemical reaction of saponification creates a gentle soap, which will have different levels of the fats/oils left over for moisturizing).

 

I would also recommend jojoba oil for the skin as a gentle moisturizer. It is very close to the skin's natural oils and absorbs quickly- non-greasy.

 

I suffered reading your description of your son's acne. My son was getting acne on his forehead so badly that the pustules were crowded together and he had barely any clear skin showing. I started him on Dan Kern's regimen and he is completely clear now, with scarring reduced to almost nothing. It is continuing to disappear with maintenance. We had to go to a higher percentage benzoyl peroxide for a little while, once per day, instead of the 2.5%, but we have scaled back and now I believe he is using the 2.5% once per day to keep clear.

 

I hope you can find a solution you and your son can both live with!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...