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  1. Time Left: 11 days and 8 hours

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    $3 Pop Bottle Science: great condition $5 Janice Vancleave's Earth Science for Every Kid: great condition pending $5 Constellations for Every Kid: Great condition $5 Janice Vancleave's Biology for Every Kid: great condition. Pending All pages in tact. There appears to be no writing in any of these books, aside from a name on one cover. Buyer pays shipping. Buy all four and Media Mail shipping is on me (USA). WILLING TO SHIP TO APO OR INTERNATIONAL

    $5.00

  2. I'm looking for some BTDT advice from people whose kids have been accepted to college with something other than the standard 3 credits w/ lab - Biology, Chemistry,Physics - on their transcripts. How have colleges reacted to students having other science w/ lab credits besides the "big 3?" My dd is not a stem student, but she's always loved Astronomy and she'd like to take the Astronomy class at the local CC as one of her science credits. They offer two options, Stellar Astronomy and Astronomy of the Solar System. They both are lab courses, transferable to the states 4-year unis (CSU & UC) and AA-degree applicable. Could she take this instead of taking Physics as one of her 3 science credits without adversely affecting her college application? I know you are supposed to look at colleges dc are interested in to make this decision, but that's not really helping me. She's in 9th so doesn't really know where she wants to go. Option 1 is doing 2 years of DE at the CC then transferring to a state school. Astronomy will work for that. But if she wants to go directly to a 4-year college: Some say specifically that you need Bio, Chem & Physics. How rigid is that? It seems like I read about kids all the time who have taken alternative sequences and still gotten into college. Is this right, or am I wishful thinking? Other colleges say "2 science required (3 preferred); one life science and one physical science required." It seems like Astronomy works in that case. What says the Hive?
  3. Please let me know what your recommendations are for a good star projector and planet model. My boy is finally interested in something other than computer games - or maybe there's a good computer simulation? TIA
  4. I finally finished our Earth Science and Astronomy Curriculum for next year! Here it is http://wateronthefloor.wordpress.com/earth-scienceastronomy/. It is based on WTM with some added extras:) Enjoy!
  5. Long time no see! My baby is currently a junior in software engineering, and I am an empty nester, so I don't visit these boards like I use to. :D With my love of astronomy, I decided to take an astronomy class at the local university this semester--I know my way around the night sky and am working my way through the Herschell 400 with my telescope, but I have never studied the physics side of this hobby of mine. The textbook we are using is good: In Quest of the Universe by Theo Koupelis We have the 6th edition. Comes with a Starry Night DVD http://books.google.com/books/about/In_Quest_of_the_Universe.html?id=GVlpKZ67DscC My prof use to work with the author--and my prof is a really nice, down-to-earth, night-sky-loving sort of guy. We are about a third of the way through the book--I can give you more info later if you want it. I have read through most of Astronomy Today--a textbook often recommended on these boards. When I am looking for information and read both textbooks to compare them, I find In Quest's vocabulary and explanations easier to understand. So....if you are looking, this is another option. Jean
  6. What are some living books you have used for earth and space science? Also, what science encyclopedia would you recommend for this age group? I am not interested in a boxed curriculum such Elemental Science, NOEO, etc. I want to put together my own but need some ideas and recommendations for living books and an encyclopedia to use as a spine. Edit to add...we are very conservative Christians. We will teach that some people believe in evolution but we teach young earth creationism. Thanks in advance.
  7. Has anyone used this or had it in hand? I was able to view a pretty large sample here and I really like what I was able to see. It seemed very readable, I like the questions at the beginning of the chapters a lot.
  8. Shows how far Mars is in pixels if the earth was 100 pixels wide. http://www.distancetomars.com
  9. Was doing some online digging to see what kind of resources are out there for Chaisson's Astronomy Today and I thought I'd share what I found. :) Regentrude has kindly shared the companion website for either the 4th or 5th edition in the past (sorry, Regentrude - I can't remember which!) but I'll share them both here again: Companion website for the 4th ed Companion website for the 5th ed I've found a number of college websites where the text is being used for a course and most have course webpages with syllabi. Some are definitely more useful than others - here are a few that I thought had a plethora of lecture notes, quizzes, practice exams, and other goodies: Astronomy I course using 1st half of 7th edition of text (from East Tennessee State University) Astronomy II course using 2nd half of 7th edition of text (from East Tennessee State University) The above two courses have the same prof. Astronomy 1000 course from Georgia Southern using all of the 7th edition The webpage layout on this one leaves something to be desired but, as you scroll down, the prof gives an outline of each lesson he's going to give including what sections of the text are covered, his lecture notes in PDF, and other links to websites that correspond to the lecture topic. If you scroll aaaaaaaaalllllllllllllll the way to the bottom, he has two very short practice exams with answers. Another Astronomy II course from East Tennessee with a different prof using the 6th edition Has links to a lecture syllabus which could be used to schedule part of the text, lecture notes in PDF, problem sets in PDF (no answers, though), exam reviews in PDF (no answers here, either), and 5 different practice exams (in PDF) WITH posted answers including a 100 mc question final exam! Apparently, a student doesn't have to take Astronomy I to take Astronomy II, though, so you could use his materials but only cover part of the text. Introduction to Astronomy at UTexas at Austin using Volume 2 of the 6th edition (apparently, you can get the text split into 2 volumes) Course at the University of Wisconsin using Volume 2 of the 7th edition (prof says the 6th edition is OK but pages won't necessarily match up)
  10. I'm stuck about what to do next for ds13. He is interested in astronomy, and I am out of ideas. He has watched; Understanding the Universe, and Cosomology:The History and Nature of Our Universe, both from the Great Courses. He loved these. He has read Astronomy Today. His is in beginners algebra in math. So anything not math heavy would be good. Any recommendations for courses, books, dvds. I can't use Netflix so dvds would be best.
  11. Can anyone give me some recommendations for early elementary age books on astronomy? Nonfiction, fiction, curriculum, ...
  12. #1 I suggest you 1st know the night sky and learn the constellations. Get a sky map, planisphere for you latitude, or some kind of sky chart. Get a red flashlight so that you don't loose your night vision every time you turn a light on (a regular flashlight with some red fingernail polish on the lens works too--adjust the amount of light by using fingernail polish remover). If you want to spend the money, get a laser pointer so that you can show each other what you are finding. Lasers--see this post: http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2181141#poststop Read some books. This is one of my favorites: http://www.amazon.com/Find-Constellations-H-Rey/dp/054713178X/ And I never go without this each year: http://www.shopatsky.com/category/s?keyword=skywatch And this is free and wonderful: Stellarium http://stellarium.org/ McAfee and Nortons might consider Stellarium a virus, so you might have to go in and add them to the list of things they don't have to worry about. #2 Look at the sky with a pair of binoculars. It is likely that you already have one. Binocs--see this post: http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2176737#poststop If you prefer something that looks like a telescope but sees about the same as a pair of binocs, the Galileoscope is a good option. I prefer a pair of binocs with a tripod over this, but your child might be dying for a scope, and this is a nice option: https://www.galileoscope.org/gs/ Read some books! This is one of my favorites which includes stuff to look for with binocs: http://www.amazon.com/Star-Watch-Astronomers-Observing-Celestial/dp/0471418048/ #3 If you still are interested in a telescope, I'd suggest you visit an astronomy club. Look through their scopes. Ask questions. Then...here are some to consider: I love the Dobsonians. Best telescope for the money imo. Here is the one I have: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1-599-63-67-4295 It comes in a 4.5", 6", 8", 10"....and up. You want a red dot finder or a telrad if it does not come with one--this is what I have and recommend highly: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1084&kw=telrad&st=2 Without a red dot finder, you will likely leave the scope in the basement or attic. Really. Don't ignore this. You will need to collimate your Dob (get the mirrors lined up so that they reflect the light perfectly into your eyepiece). Ask what they recommend for a collimator. I have a good one, but you might not want to spend this much: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=13100&kw=%20collimator&st=2 Most scopes come with a cap that is suppose to do the collimation...I've never used them. They are not as easy to use as a good collimator, but people make them work all the time, so you might be able to get by without buying something more. As I said, ask what they recommend. If you don't want this big of a scope, if you want to use it to travel, if you want a smaller beginner scope, this is what I wrote someone today: I called OPT today since so many folks have asked about small telescopes--these are the people I go to with my telescope questions when the astronomy club can't tell me what I need. They are #1 with customer service. I asked what beginner scope they would recommend for kids, for travel, small/compact (not the larger Dobsonian style scope), etc. The scope he loves the most is the Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Reflector Telescope: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1-600-602-1119-9195 He said it is the best quality for the money--good optics, good tripod, rugged enough to travel well. It already has a red dot finder on it. You should ask if they recommend your buying a collimator...and you can get a padded case for it under the accessories if you want it. And then there is always this Astroscan: http://www.scientificsonline.com/astroscan-plus-telescope.html I've never used it, but some folks highly recommend it. It has the red dot finder and does not need collimation...but I'd get the tripod to go with it. Please if any of you own this, let me know what you think of it!!! :) http://wardsci.com/product.asp?pn=IG0012042&cm_mmc=Mercent-_-Google-_-NULL-_-254201&mr:trackingCode=F65F975B-6581-DE11-8C0A-000423C27502&mr:referralID=NA Read books. Sit in the isle at the book stores and thumb through the astronomy books to find something that suits you. There are lots of telescope books. The Starwatch (linked above) is a great place to start. There are lots of others that are really good, too. Have I forgotten anything? Blow those clouds away!!! :)Jean
  13. DD will be 9 in two weeks! How did that happen? She is obsessed with all things space. I am putting together a book list for the grandparents but I would love some advice from the Hive. So what do you or your kiddos love?
  14. I'm considering Astronomy from the Potter's School for my dd14. Does anyone have comments from previous experience with this class? Or have you used another online astronomy course that you would recommend? Many Thanks, JR
  15. I have never put together a program on my own. I need a secular approach for a high school level course. I've been searching on the board but I'm not finding an answer to my questions. I was thinking I should probably start with a textbook and supplement it with videos and additional reading selections. I'm just not sure where to start! I discovered my library has The Great Courses Understanding the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy, except they do not have the 1st DVD in the set. How can I find a good secular astronomy textbook? Or if not a textbook, then a book that covers enough information to give me a good spine. But then how do I know when or how to add other materials to round out the course? I'm thinking that a textbook and the Great Courses course will be enough, but we still need some kind of written work and tests. I would be compiling all of this into a portfolio to submit to our online school so they'll give ds a credit on his transcript. DH thinks this may be too hard but ds would prefer to do an Astronomy course as an extra Science or elective than one of the Keystone offerings so I thought I'd at least look into it. Thank you!
  16. http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2012/02/17/147071253/video-a-tornado-on-the-sun?sc=fb&cc=fp Wow. :eek:
  17. Looking for some dvds (Netflix episodes would be fantastic) or online clips that would help round out TTC's My Favorite Universe. We just finished My Favorite Universe which is a great introduction to the subject. But I want to add in more detail. I don't really want a lot of reading - wouldn't mind some short magazine type articles - because of the reading load the boys already have. Any ideas?
  18. My son loves astronomy. He's not crazy about science in general, so I thought maybe giving him something he enjoys would help. I read about Signs & Seasons in the Rainbow Resource catalog, but would like to hear from someone who has actually done it. He's done Apologia general and physical science. Was going to do biology next year, but to say he's less than enthusiastic about it is an understatement. Advice welcome!!
  19. I'm considering Signs & Seasons for my 8th grade DD next year. The website says that it is a high school curriculum. Is it really? Looking at the sample pages it seems a bit simple. Are there more complex chapters? I think it sounds like a very interesting book and could be a good fit for DD, but I'm worried about there not being enough "meat". Thoughts?
  20. My son will be in kindergarten and wants to be a "spaceman" when he grows up. We are doing astronomy for science this coming year and I am adding some living books about different astronomers. I would love to add some living books about astronauts. Can anyone make any suggestions appropriate for early elementary read alouds?
  21. I have been busy working putting together pages for our high school plans that many people ask me about all the time. Here are the links...hope they are helpful. Remember I homeschool using both the classical model and Charlotte Mason methods for homeschooling so I tend to go with a more "living books" approach to courses. Chemistry for High Schoolers Astronomy for High Schoolers Notebooking in High School Videography for High School Robotics for High School Charlotte Mason for High School including this one in case you are interested in seeing how I pull her ideas into our homeschool
  22. Here: http://shadowandsubstance.com/ I linked to see info. about the lunar eclipse on the solstice, but it has lots of other good stuff. Enjoy!
  23. I put this together for a few of the homeschool groups in the area. Thought I'd pass it on to you as well. Hopefully your weather forecast is better than ours! :) Jean Tonight the moon will be full--but not only will it be full, but it will be larger and brighter than most full moons! I've put together some information about the full moon that you might not know: The Algonquian Indians called the January full moon the Wolf Moon--a time when the Wolves howled longer through the night, perhaps because the food was scarce or, due to the earth being closer to the sun this time of year, the moon is brighter. Europeans called it Old moon. I, however, prefer the name of Ice Moon. It seems so appropriate in Wisconsin! A full moon occurs when the sun, earth, and moon line up in a row. If the moon is directly behind the earth, we get an eclipse; but usually the moon is a little above or below so that the earth does not block the light coming from the sun. This website shows the moon's rotation around the earth and how that affects what shape the moon takes when viewed from earth: http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/moonphase/ If you think about it, in order for the moon to be full, the sun must be located on one side of the earth, while the moon is on the other. As the earth spins today, we will see the sun rise in the east and set in the west; at the time that the sun is setting, we will see the moon rising in the east. ALWAYS when full, the moon is rising when the sun is setting. Tonight the moon should rise a little after 5:00 p.m. here in Wisconsin. The moon is not always the same distance from earth because its path around the earth is an ellipse--when it is at its closest, it is know as being "at perigee"; when it is at its furthest, it is know as "at apogee". Two days from now (Fri., Jan. 21st), the moon will be at perigee. At this website, you can see a picture of the full moon at perigee and apogee: http://www.moonconnection.com/apogee_perigee.phtml You can see the difference, can't you! So...the moon tonight is full, it is brighter than usual, and bigger than usual...but we are suppose to have clouds. <sigh> So how might you observe tonight's full moon? I suggest you take a walk in the moonlight--even if it is cloudy, usually there is enough light to walk outside without a flashlight if you let your eyes adjust to the darkness. Beware--white light from a flash light will cause your pupils to shrink, so spend a little time in the dark letting your eyes adjust with your lights and flashlights turned off. If you have a red flashlight, take that with you if you want--red does not affect your eye's dilation as much as white light. You can make a red flashlight with red fingernail polish--adjust the amount of light that is let through the lens with a bit of polish remover. Or, if you are not into a late night hike, what about making a meal of foods that are round? Apples, oranges, pancakes, pizza... And we will hope for the clouds to open up enough for a peak at tonight's great big moon! Jean
  24. #1 I suggest you 1st know the night sky and learn the constellations. Get a sky map, planisphere for you latitude, or some kind of sky chart. Get a red flashlight so that you don't loose your night vision every time you turn a light on (a regular flashlight with some red fingernail polish on the lens works too--adjust the amount of light by using fingernail polish remover). If you want to spend the money, get a laser pointer so that you can show each other what you are finding. Lasers--see this post: http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2181141#poststop Read some books. This is one of my favorites: http://www.amazon.com/Find-Constellations-H-Rey/dp/054713178X/ And I never go without this each year: http://www.shopatsky.com/category/s?keyword=skywatch And this is free and wonderful: Stellarium http://stellarium.org/ McAfee and Nortons might consider Stellarium a virus, so you might have to go in and add them to the list of things they don't have to worry about. #2 Look at the sky with a pair of binoculars. It is likely that you already have one. Binocs--see this post: http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2176737#poststop If you prefer something that looks like a telescope but sees about the same as a pair of binocs, the Galileoscope is a good option. I prefer a pair of binocs with a tripod over this, but your child might be dying for a scope, and this is a nice option: https://www.galileoscope.org/gs/ Read some books! This is one of my favorites which includes stuff to look for with binocs: http://www.amazon.com/Star-Watch-Astronomers-Observing-Celestial/dp/0471418048/ #3 If you still are interested in a telescope, I'd suggest you visit an astronomy club. Look through their scopes. Ask questions. Then...here are some to consider: I love the Dobsonians. Best telescope for the money imo. Here is the one I have: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1-599-63-67-4295 It comes in a 4.5", 6", 8", 10"....and up. You want a red dot finder or a telrad if it does not come with one--this is what I have and recommend highly: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1084&kw=telrad&st=2 Without a red dot finder, you will likely leave the scope in the basement or attic. Really. Don't ignore this. You will need to collimate your Dob (get the mirrors lined up so that they reflect the light perfectly into your eyepiece). Ask what they recommend for a collimator. I have a good one, but you might not want to spend this much: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=13100&kw=%20collimator&st=2 Most scopes come with a cap that is suppose to do the collimation...I've never used them. They are not as easy to use as a good collimator, but people make them work all the time, so you might be able to get by without buying something more. As I said, ask what they recommend. If you don't want this big of a scope, if you want to use it to travel, if you want a smaller beginner scope, this is what I wrote someone today: I called OPT today since so many folks have asked about small telescopes--these are the people I go to with my telescope questions when the astronomy club can't tell me what I need. They are #1 with customer service. I asked what beginner scope they would recommend for kids, for travel, small/compact (not the larger Dobsonian style scope), etc. The scope he loves the most is the Celestron AstroMaster 130EQ Reflector Telescope: http://www.optcorp.com/product.aspx?pid=1-600-602-1119-9195 He said it is the best quality for the money--good optics, good tripod, rugged enough to travel well. It already has a red dot finder on it. You should ask if they recommend your buying a collimator...and you can get a padded case for it under the accessories if you want it. And then there is always this Astroscan: http://www.scientificsonline.com/astroscan-plus-telescope.html I've never used it, but some folks highly recommend it. It has the red dot finder and does not need collimation...but I'd get the tripod to go with it. Please if any of you own this, let me know what you think of it!!! :) http://wardsci.com/product.asp?pn=IG0012042&cm_mmc=Mercent-_-Google-_-NULL-_-254201&mr:trackingCode=F65F975B-6581-DE11-8C0A-000423C27502&mr:referralID=NA Read books. Sit in the isle at the book stores and thumb through the astronomy books to find something that suits you. There are lots of telescope books. The Starwatch (linked above) is a great place to start. There are lots of others that are really good, too. Have I forgotten anything? Blow those clouds away!!! :)Jean
  25. Hi, Our kids are really excited about astronomy, so we want to get them a telescope for Christmas. As we did a little research, we found several people recommended starting children with a good pair of binoculars rather than a telescope. I figured asking here would be a good place to get real-life "BTDT" recommendations. Have you used binoculars or a telescope with your children to look at the night sky? What has been your experience? Which do you prefer? Do you have a suggestion for a specific brand/type/strength? Our kids (who will be using it) are 7 and 5, if that makes a difference. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks
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