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  1. Dear Forum Folk, We hope you have found The Well-Trained Mind and these forums to be excellent resources for your home schooling efforts! We’ve been in the classical education business for over 15 years, providing homeschooling families with high-quality, ground-breaking resources that combine the best of the classical tradition with innovative teaching methods. In fact, more than half a million parents have successfully used the curricula, book lists, and methods of The Well-Trained Mind to teach their children at home. Now, we’re excited to bring you the second academic year of the Well-Trained Mind Academy, with experienced instructors to further your ability to homeschool your children at middle school and high school levels of learning. We’ve listened to our customers who feel they would benefit from access to instructors for advanced or technical subjects. Explore our online course offerings to discover exciting new options for your family! Over 25 full-year courses and 13 single-semester electives. Special focus on written language, small class sizes, and instructor feedback. New electives offering music theory, Socratic discussion, spoken rhetoric, and grammar. Pre-Registration for the 2015-2016 Academic Year is available only until April 14th, which entitles you to the steepest discounts we will provide to the general public! Simply visit our site for a list of courses, and pre-register today! www.WTMAcademy.com Contact Us: 844-986-9862 Why the extension? Many have asked us about monthly payment plans. We’re finalizing a system that will allow families to make automated monthly payments on tuition, rather than having to pay the full amount up front. It's almost ready to go, but still needs thorough testing. So we’ve decided to delay general registration until that payment-plan testing is finished.
  2. This is a fairly new title, but has anyone used or seen feedback on it? I'm looking at it for next year. 3rd and 4th graders. Any feedback or links to other threads appreciated!!!
  3. I'm thinking of teaching a science course for 3rd and 4th graders at our co-op. Does anyone have experience with Apologia's Young Explorers Chemistry/Physics? Would that be a good fit for this group? Obviously, we could not finish the book in one semester (10 classes, 45 min) but possibly we could continue the 2nd semester. I'm thinking that we would follow the book but do a brief lesson at beginning (10-15 min) and then the remainder would be hands-on activities/experiments. We did do a chemistry (REal Science 4 Kids) pre-level last year, and liked that. But I was thinking this curriculum would expand on that. The other thing I want to ask -- are the materials for the experiments fairly easy to put hands on? We have some basic equipment (graduated cylinders) here. Also I have two classroom kits, one for states of matter and one for polymers which we could use. Would those fit in? Any thoughts and suggestions would be very welcome!
  4. Hello all: I would appreciate your input on this dilemma. I am home schooling my high school son. He is currently in 9th grade. He would like to attend Arizona State University (ASU). When I reviewed their admission requirements it says that any science lab courses completed in high school must be "live labs". No virtual labs on computer are accepted. ASU is not clear about accepting science labs done in the home environment. The labs we do are "live", meaning we use real equipment (i.e. microscope, slides, dissection equipment, etc.) in our home school science courses. My concern is that they will not accept these labs. I have talked with different advisors at ASU and received different answers. And there will be no guarantee that what they tell us today will be what they judge his transcript by in 3 years when he applies to college. This has been my plan. What do you all suggest? 9th grade: His first semester of Biology was completed at a local public high school. The second semester we decided to home school him. We continued with Biology by completing Apologia Biology. 10th grade: We plan on doing Apologia Chemistry 12th grade: We plan on having him take Physics at a local community college for dual credit for the 1st semester. The second semester we plan on having him take Anatomy and Physiology at the local community college for dual credit. Have any of you encountered difficulty getting a college to accept home school high school labs? What did you do? All your advice and suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thanks, Denny
  5. I saw this come across my FB feed this morning and thought it would be of interest. ETA: ack I forgot the link. http://blog.drwile.com/?p=13271 My disclaimer. I really don't know what happened b/w Dr. Wile ( who wrote the Exploring Creation series) and Apologia. This could be a case of sour grapes for Apologia rewriting his books. However, he has positive things to say of the 3rd edition of the Anatomy book. His review is highly detailed giving specifics on his issues with the new edition. His reasoning is logical and consistent. Enough so, that even though my eldest is in 1st grade, I'm picking up a used copy of the 2nd edition.
  6. Started in Feb 2015 https://www.coursera.org/course/chem991 "This is an introductory course for students with limited background in chemistry; basic concepts involved in chemical compositions, periodic trends, reactions, and quantitative problem solving will be emphasized with the goal of preparing students for further study in chemistry." Optional text "Nivaldo Tro’s Introduction to Chemistry: Essentials 4th Edition" "Course Syllabus Week One: Introductions with an overview of scientific methods, scientific notation, measurements, units and unit conversions, using proper significant figures to indicate precision, general concepts in matter and energy including definitions of atoms, elements, molecules, compounds, and moles, chemical formula stoichiometry, basic layout of the periodic table, examples of endothermic and exothermic reactions, and Coulomb’s law. Week Two: More study of atomic structure including ions and isotopes, information on the organizations of the periodic table of elements including some periodic trends (orbital energy, ionization energy, electronegativity, and atomic radius), identification of the subatomic particles most critical to chemical reactions, and introduction to ionic bonding. Introduction to calculations involving heat capacity and density. Week Three: Determination of oxidation states, comparison of ionic and covalent bonding concepts, nomenclature for both ionic and molecular compounds including those containing polyatomic ions, and introduction to calculations involving formula mass and/or density. Week Four: Introduction to chemical composition calculations (compound stoichiometry); application of mole ratios and more practice with gram/mole and mass percent calculations; determination of empirical and molecular formulas; balancing chemical reaction equations. Week Five: No new topics this week. Optional peer-reviewed writing assignment due for students interested in earning a statement of accomplishment with distinction. Week Six: Practice writing and balancing chemical reaction equations for dissolution processes; reaction stoichiometry application exercises; introduction to equilibrium constants using the solubility product constant as an illustration; electrolytes. Week Seven: Introduction to precipitation, acid-base, and redox reactions; more practice applying reaction stoichiometry concepts; reaction calculations including limiting reagent, yield, and enthalpy changes. Week Eight: No new topics this week. Complete exam and course survey."
  7. Started in Feb 2015 https://www.coursera.org/course/chem991 "This is an introductory course for students with limited background in chemistry; basic concepts involved in chemical compositions, periodic trends, reactions, and quantitative problem solving will be emphasized with the goal of preparing students for further study in chemistry." Optional text "Nivaldo Tro’s Introduction to Chemistry: Essentials 4th Edition" "Course Syllabus Week One: Introductions with an overview of scientific methods, scientific notation, measurements, units and unit conversions, using proper significant figures to indicate precision, general concepts in matter and energy including definitions of atoms, elements, molecules, compounds, and moles, chemical formula stoichiometry, basic layout of the periodic table, examples of endothermic and exothermic reactions, and Coulomb’s law. Week Two: More study of atomic structure including ions and isotopes, information on the organizations of the periodic table of elements including some periodic trends (orbital energy, ionization energy, electronegativity, and atomic radius), identification of the subatomic particles most critical to chemical reactions, and introduction to ionic bonding. Introduction to calculations involving heat capacity and density. Week Three: Determination of oxidation states, comparison of ionic and covalent bonding concepts, nomenclature for both ionic and molecular compounds including those containing polyatomic ions, and introduction to calculations involving formula mass and/or density. Week Four: Introduction to chemical composition calculations (compound stoichiometry); application of mole ratios and more practice with gram/mole and mass percent calculations; determination of empirical and molecular formulas; balancing chemical reaction equations. Week Five: No new topics this week. Optional peer-reviewed writing assignment due for students interested in earning a statement of accomplishment with distinction. Week Six: Practice writing and balancing chemical reaction equations for dissolution processes; reaction stoichiometry application exercises; introduction to equilibrium constants using the solubility product constant as an illustration; electrolytes. Week Seven: Introduction to precipitation, acid-base, and redox reactions; more practice applying reaction stoichiometry concepts; reaction calculations including limiting reagent, yield, and enthalpy changes. Week Eight: No new topics this week. Complete exam and course survey."
  8. 2 related questions regarding the DSST Principles of Physical Science exam #1. Is the amount of Physics knowledge needed for this exam significantly less than for either of the 2 Algebra-based AP Physics exams? [This (academic) year, the College Board split their old AP Physics B exam into 2 exams -- AP Physics 1, Algebra-Based and AP Physics 2, Algebra-Based.] #2. Is the amount of Chemistry knowledge needed for this exam signicantly less than for either the AP or CLEP Chemistry exams? Thanks. - RJ in Delaware
  9. How to Use DIVE Integrated Chemistry & Physics identifies the following textbooks as appropriate for an honor-level high school Integrated Chemistry & Physics course: DIVE Integrated Chemistry and Physics Internet Textbook ABeka 9th Grade Science: Matter and Energy, 1st Edition Bob Jones Physical World Bob Jones Physical Science, 4th or 5th ed. Prentice Hall Physical Science, Concepts in Action 2009 Does anyone have experience using any of these (or the DIVE Integrated Chemistry & Physics course itself) to prepare for the DSST Physical Science exam ["Newton’s Laws of Motion, energy & momentum, thermodynamics, wave and optics, electricity and magnetism, chemistry, properties of matter, atomic theory & structure, chemical reactions"]? Thank you. - R Johnson Delaware, USA
  10. My rising ninth grader completed Bridget Ardoin's Physical Science in 7th, FLVS Earth and Space Science this year, and is in the middle of their Biology class. She will be in PreCalc next year. She really enjoys on-line classes to which we add hands-on labs, projects, & extra readings. Do you think that Thinkwell Chemistry sounds like a good fit for this kid? I was thinking of adding CK01A Chemistry kit to it to give her hands on labs. The price of both of those together would be less than doing FLVS for the year, and it sounds like it would be a higher level chemistry. What do you think?
  11. If dd will continue her foreign languages track she will not only have an integrated math exam, but also an integrated science exam. Practically it means she will have a 12th grade exam with some chemistry, several biology and a lot,of physics topics. For Physics and Biology I found textbooks covering our examtopics, but Chemistry seems to be a little bit odd to me. She just has to learn about chemistry in relation to food and health in a human body. Anybody knows a texbook/course about that? She has to learn more about sacharids, lipids and the chemistry of food in your body then about chemical reactions. She will learn about polymeres though. In grade 9+10 we will cover IGCSE Chemistry so she will have some more general chemistry under her belt before this. Integrated science is a 3 hour subject in grade 11+ 12 and Chemistry seems to be the smaller part, so i am not looking for a yearfilling project. I hope anybody has soms suggestions.
  12. ...So we've spent the past few months going through Exploring Creation with Chemistry and Physics (Apologia Young Explorers) and we're just wrapping up the last chapter on chemistry, but I don't feel ready to be done with it (also because we're nowhere near through the periodic table, though they've memorized it thanks to a 1000 piece puzzle of it they recently finished). At the same time, my grandiose plan to spend 1-2 hours a week on "life skills" hasn't panned out, so as I took delight in tasting the butter we made today (chemistry experiment), the idea popped into my head that maybe instead of going forward with physics (which we could save for next year), we ought to spend the rest of the year on chemistry, but make a hybrid of life skills by centering it on cooking and cleaning. We tend to be more bookish around here and neglect those practical, hands-on tasks, so I'm thinking this could be a means toward balance. My "curriculum" so far (for my kids ages 8, 10, 12), but I'd love to get other suggestions: Home Skills for Girls Home Skills for Boys Science Experiments You Can Eat Basher's Periodic Table The Elements (Visual Guide) This is intriguing but I'm not sure if the science is up to date and we don't want to use harsh chemicals. Anyone done anything like this?
  13. Hello! I was wondering what one does with a almost 6 year old who loves to mix things? He's been like this since he was little (2? 3?). I just assumed it was a part of being a kid. But I really think he enjoys it. So, I got this idea from another thread: buy jumbo test tubes, set towels down, set flour, corn starch, salt, vinegar, etc near the kitchen sink and let him at it. I also bought droppers. Graduated beakers are on the way. I have color tablets for the 2 year old. Is there anything else I can do? That suggestion was brilliant! I can't believe I didn't think of it before. :) Kits are fine. I don't necessarily want to make anything at this stage, but please don't hesitate to make any suggestions along those lines. I'm just wondering if there's something else that I can do for my son. I'm going to ask x-post this. Thanks for any input!
  14. Hello! I was wondering what one does with a almost 6 year old who loves to mix things? He's been like this since he was little (2? 3?). I just assumed it was a part of being a kid. But I really think he enjoys it. So, I got this idea from another thread: buy jumbo test tubes, set towels down, set flour, corn starch, salt, vinegar, etc near the kitchen sink and let him at it. I also bought droppers. Graduated beakers are on the way. I have color tablets for the 2 year old. Is there anything else I can do? Kits are fine. I don't necessarily want to make anything at this stage, but please don't hesitate to make any suggestions along those lines. I'm just wondering if there's something else that I can do for my son. I'm going to ask x-post this. Thanks for any input!
  15. Dd wants to go to high school part-time. She is a very social person. We had been meeting her social needs by having several small co-ops with other families that we have known for years. However, we are finding that she has outgrown them academically. They are still very close friends, but none of them were ready to move on to Chemistry. They are doing Earth Science. We did high school Biology last year. I just don't think I have it in me to teach Chemistry to one kid next year. I need a group with due dates to keep us on track. I had hoped to form another co-op, but we really don't have any other high school aged kids in our area who would be open to a secular science class. Not doing Apologia here. So, we looked at the very well-regarded high school for science. Her options are Earth Science (that we have done to death) or Honors Chemistry. I figured Honors Chem would be challenging, but I felt that if she buckled down this summer to finish up Algebra and did the Teaching Company high school Chem course this summer, she would be ready. Well, her definition of buckling down and mine did not match. She is not done with Algebra. We had been doing Singapore Math (Discovering Mathematics), but I switched to Khan Academy this summer to make sure that she got everything in since Singapore does not follow a traditional scope and sequence. She is less than half-way through the Chemistry video course (which mainly focuses on the math needed for Chemistry - not a full course.) Our high school is filled with honors students - over 25% have a GPA above a 4 due to honors weighting. Most of the families I know say that the non-honors courses tend to be not very challenging and are filled with kids who don't care much about school - not the environment I want my daughter to be in. Hence, the Honors chem for freshman. The other science track doesn't have them taking Chem until junior year and they are unwilling to put her in that one. The organized coops in our area are filled with YEC and, from past experience, the classes are not very challenging, they are not taught well (read the book, reiterate what was in the book, fill in a worksheet) and they are boring. So, what do I do with dd? She does not really want to do an online class - she saw her brothers do that and doesn't think it is for her. Not opposed to online environment as she is taking Latin online and may take a Bravewriter class or two, but she does not want to do science online. We do have an option of a Science Olympiad group - they are a very successful group. But, I am hesitant because many of the families are evangelical Christians of the Young Earth Creationist flavor and I have had bad experiences with them in the past (shunning me and my kids in a vary obvious "you Catholics are evil heathens" way.) Plus, I am not sure how to put that on a transcript. If we do an online class, are there any that have synchronous meeting times and good lab portions that are not watered down "the math is too hard" types of classes? Sorry if this is rambling. I just feel under the gun as I am meeting with the high school counselor on Wednesday and know that many classes are filling up.
  16. you'll probably be interested in the author's response to that question. This is my first time posting:blush5: I'm including my own question, so that you can understand the context the question was posed in. What he says makes perfect sense to me! Here it goes... Hi Midori, Thank you for your interest in Conceptual Chemistry. I should tell you a bit about some of the problems we college professors face when teaching general chemistry: 1) Our students have such widely varied experiences in previous chemistry courses. So much so, that we can't assume much. Therefore, we take the attitude that we're starting from scratch. Any insight that students bring with them from previous courses is an added plus. Often, though, we spend time "unteaching". Working with conversion factors is often a hurdle in that regard. 2) Many of our students are whizzes at math. They can plug through the questions at the end of the chapter and come through with the correct answers. But they don't understand what those answers mean. We find that these students have done quite well in their high school (even AP) courses. They're accustomed to doing well, which is why they get irate to discover that their old algorithmic methods are no longer working. In college we demand conceptual understanding along with mathematical prowess. 3) Then there's the flip side of #2. Many students are strong with the concepts, but they are weak with the math. They too suffer. Conceptual Chemistry is foremost a college chemistry text for the nonscience major. My students are typically seniors who have delayed taking their science requirement to their last semester of college. These are student who are not destined to become future scientists. But they are destined to become the general public, which has an incredible need to understand the workings and discoveries of science. The nature of this curriculum has made it also popular with high schools. The chemistry is NOT watered down. This is a serious college level course amenable to motivated younger students. That said, as per its title, the focus is on the concepts of chemistry. Quantitative problem solving, such as stoichiometry, is certainly included but it's not the main entree. Does Conceptual Chemistry work well for a student who is confident that he or she will be taking college level general chemistry? Yes. But only if the student is doing well with his or her math courses. The mathematics of general chemistry really aren't that complicated. What's really important are the analytical thinking skills that math helps to nurture. The students who are most adequately prepared for college general chemistry are the ones with a strong handle on the concepts of chemistry alongside strong analytical thinking skills. Keep in mind #1 from above. I disagree with the idea that Conceptual Chemistry needs to be followed up with a more rigorous math-intensive high school chemistry course. I agree, however, that it must be supplemented with math-intensive math courses. Keep in mind #3 from above. Ultimately, it depends on the student. Some will do well in college Gen Chem with very little background in either the concepts or the math. What is most important is that the student be excited about the chemistry. This is particularly true for the high school student who is just beginning to decide career paths. Too much too soon could turn some students off. For others, though, they may be chomping at the bit. I recommend your child take a look at a "math intensive" chemistry book along side Conceptual Chemistry, 4e. If they happen to pick CC4e, make sure that they've also read this email. Will I end up with a Problem Solving book like that of Conceptual Physics? Not in the immediate future. But thank you for suggesting it. I should mention that CC4e is now being fitted with my publisher's Mastering Chemistry tutorial/assessment program, which I know will be very attractive to homeschoolers. It will be ready by this summer. You should check out the following link: MasteringChemistry.com I hope you find this information helpful. You are welcome to post this reply to the homeschool forums. I would very much appreciate that. Please let me know if I can be of any further assistance. Good chemistry to you, John On Mar 7, 2011, at 11:33 AM, TM Stock wrote: > Dear Dr. Suchocki, > > We are homeschoolers and I’d like to use “Conceptual Chemistry†for our children’s high school years, but I have a few questions. >> > 1. It seems that among homeschooling community “Conceptual Chemistry†is considered as a pre-chem course, which needs to be followed up by a more rigorous math-intensive chemistry sometime during the high school. In other words, they think “Conceptual Chemistry†cannot constitute a full high-school chemistry course. Is this true? Our children want to pursue science majors in universities. Would “Conceptual Chemistry†prepare them on its own? We are not interested in AP course – my question pertains to “Conceptual Chemistry†as the only chemistry course the future science majors take during their high-school years. > > > 2. If “Conceptual Chemistry†indeed needs to be supplemented with problem-solving exercises for future science majors, is there any plan to publish its math component in the same vein as “Conceptual Physicsâ€â€™s new Problem Solving book? I think this is a fabulous idea – people using Conceptual series can just add problem solving component as needed, rather than going through a whole new book later to cover the math part. > > > I’d really appreciate it if you could answer these questions. And if need be, may I quote your answer on the homeschool forums? >> > Regards, >> > Midori
  17. I learned more from this than I did in a whole year of high school chemistry. Perhaps I am just more motivated now?! It will be a fun curriculum for us, I think. Doing all the photocopying now b/c if I wait, we won't end up doing the activities and the games look very fun. It will be interesting to see how much DS7 gets from this. He will like all the videos, especially the explosions!
  18. What to do? If your student was unable to take a lab while studying BJU Chemistry and had watched all the videos on the education portal site, would you still have him take a Chemistry lab the following year if one came available? I'm trying to decide if it is really necessary or not? He is still undecided as to the career path he will choose but is leaning towards computer science or engineering. He has only had one true lab experience, which was with Biology.
  19. This fall I will be teaching Chemistry at our co-op. In the past we have used Apologia sciences for high school, but we are making the switch to BJU Chemistry this fall. In an effort to keeps costs from being astronomical (due to the books AND the additional lab supplies we would need), I looked at using the 2nd edition. The labs in the 2nd edition are pretty intense, and on one hand that really excites me. I would love for the kids to have an in-depth lab experience. On the other hand, the list of materials is immense. I think I read somewhere that the 3rd edition labs are more "homeschool friendly", but I'm wondering what that means? Easier to access materials? Decreased rigor? Both? Neither? I have researched many of the "compatible" lab kits out there, but most of them feel like convenience is traded for rigor (please correct me if I'm wrong!). I'm ok with a balance of both, but I would like opportunities for the kids to be challenged and grow in their lab skills. I'd appreciate any feedback you can offer. Do you have a preference between 2nd and 3rd editions? Could I use the 3rd ed lab book with the 2nd ed books? I'm willing to be creative to create a great lab experience for the kids and not break their parents' banks!! :001_smile:
  20. https://www.coursera.org/course/chemprep Preparation for General ChemistryThe course develops critical thinking and analytic problem solving skills within a chemistry context in order to prepare students for success in college-level General Chemistry—a key gateway class required for many undergraduate majors. Course Syllabus Week 1 - Introduction and Warm Up: Preliminary Assessment given to appraise current knowledge and help set goals; introductory material, including matter and energy, classification and properties of matter, scientific measurement and units, significant figures, dimensional analysis, and problem-solving strategies. Week 2 - Boot-Camp I: Understanding atomic structure and quantum theory, which includes properties of waves, wave-particle duality, the interaction of radiation and matter, the photoelectric effect and the Bohr atom model. Week 3 - Boot-Camp II: Introducing the concept of mole and understanding how compounds form, by differentiating ionic and covalent bonding, learning how to write molecular and empirical formulas and how to determine percent composition of compounds. Introducing solutions and how to measure their concentration. Week 4 - Boot-Camp III: Move on to chemical reactions, by understanding how to write balanced chemical equations, use them to perform various stoichiometric calculations and determine the yield of reactions; learning the different types of reactions, including combustion, precipitation, and acid-base reactions. Week 5 - Boot-Camp IV: Introduction to the thermodynamics of reactions, by discussing energy and energy changes, heat, work, enthalpy, calorimetry, and Hess's Law. Week 6 - Final Exam Preparation: Reviewing of concepts from Weeks 1-5, in preparation for the final examination. Recommended BackgroundStudents are expected to have had an introductory chemistry course, for example in high school, as well as mathematics up to the level of precalculus (e.g., algebraic expressions, algebraic equations, inequalities, functions, and graphing).
  21. Ds is using Thinkwell's chemistry course. If he skips the chapters that are omitted in the AP version (ch. 23, 25 and 26), does anyone know if the final exam is "smart" enough to substitute questions from those chapters with other material he has done, or does he have to do all of the chapters in order for the final to be relevant? I've sent the same question to Thinkwell; I'll post here if I hear back from them. Just trying to plot out the last few weeks of the year! Thank you!
  22. Ds is taking Thinkwell Chemistry this year - the regular college level class, not the AP class, since he is not taking the AP exam and also because, looking at the topics covered, the regular course covers more than the AP course. I know that without taking the AP exam score he won't be able to get AP credit at college, but I am wondering what to call the course on his transcript. Can I still call it AP Chemistry, since it covers the same topics, or should I call it Honors Chemistry or something else? The table from the Thinkwell FAQ page (http://www.thinkwellhomeschool.com/how-it-works) seems to indicate that AP high school chemistry is equivalent to the regular (college level) Thinkwell chemistry course. Thank you for helping me with my confusion!
  23. I'm working on a class for our coop, grades 1-3, and need suggestions for books/curriculum that others have found helpful. In particular, I'd like it to be "real" science that explains the principles behind experiments, along with fun hands-on activities for this age level. We would be doing the experiments as a group. Any comments/suggestions would be much appreciated!
  24. What are the pros and cons of doing labs all at once or doing them as you study. Obviously, if you do them as you study you can apply directly what you've learned. Does lumping the labs together, say done in two sections, one in the fall, one in the spring have additional drawbacks? I plan on buying a kit and the reality is we're horrid about getting to labs. Also, I'm feeling a bit frantic about melding my school schedule and his next year. Timing wise it would be better to do a couple of intensives. What has your experience been either way?
  25. My ds wants to study chemistry next year, as a 3rd grader. I was leaning toward Apologia's new book, but I have mixed feelings about it. My son loves experiments, but hates writing, boring science books, worksheets, and "busywork". Do you have any suggestions for curriculum for him? Thanks!
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