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Found 1,669 results

  1. For those who have used the Kindergarten Essentials workbooks, how many pages per day did you cover? Also, did you always present the present the lesson as described in "Introduction" or did you just let your child do the worksheet for topics that your child already knew? A lot of these lessons appear to be review for DD#2 (who has followed along with a lot of her older sister's math) and could easily be done without additional instructions, but I don't want to skip teaching the "Introductions" if it means she will miss out on the "Singapore Method." Thank you!
  2. I noticed in the 4th level of Singapore that there are an abundance of exercises available in the textbook. Honestly, we never did any of them, DS just did the workbook, and I was left wondering why we even bought the textbook. I'm considering using the 5th level to transition him from "workbook math" (even though he'll still have his BA workbooks) to "textbook math", so that he can start learning how to put his own work on his own paper, since he'll have to do that with AoPS anyway (I think? I've not actually seen one of their books in person, yet), but he can make this transition with a familiar textbook so it may be easier. It seems to me like it might be a good fit anyway, since he doesn't need all the practice in the textbook and the workbook, and I get to buy one less book, but I'm not sure if maybe that's asking too much of him - especially since I end up scribing things that are heavy on writing for him anyway, still. On the one hand I feel like doing it on your own paper isn't actually much more writing than doing it in a workbook. On the other hand, having a workbook keeps everything nice and contained for just a little while longer. FWIW, he has the 5A workbook already, so we're really only talking about 5B - 6B. I'd love to hear your thoughts!
  3. Hi everyone, My 4yo son will be turning 5 in late August. We have decided not to "start" Kindergarten until he turns 6. He will be attending a PreK program this year, but will be homeschooled the following year. I would like to start a little bit of math with him at home during this last year of preschool. We currently homeschool my upcoming 4th and 2nd graders and use Singapore math (standards edition), which I am really happy with. What would you recommend we use with my 5 year old, knowing that will use Singapore in the future? I've read mixed reviews on the Singapore Kindergarten Math. Should we go with that or is there something better? Thank you so much for any input - this will be only our second year of homeschooling, so I'm still quite new to all of this!
  4. I always feel like 3rd grade is the year that I need to "get more serious" with curriculum choices, lol. For my DD (my 3rd, 3rd grader) we'll likely be continuing on with most things and starting new with others. Language Arts: Phonics/Spelling: Finish the Explode the Code series through book 8 (we're on book 6 now). Assorted phonics workbooks (she loves workbooks) Grammar: Possibly Easy Grammar, not sure yet. This is the first year I start "formal" grammar. Reading/Literature: Chapter Books with some basic book reports maybe some units from Moving Beyond the Page or Progeny Press; Core Knowledge Reading Skills Readers (free for download); the old Steck Vaughn Reading workbooks--we're finishing up Swells and Shells (grade 4) now. She loves these! Also listening in on poetry study with older siblings. Composition: She's been working on IEW's All Things Fun and Fascinating and also Bible Heroes. We'll continue with that and add in IEW SWI A, and possibly CAP Writing and Rhetoric Fable I. She already writes a lot of stories, keeps a journal/diary, and writes personal letters (for mailing) to friends. Handwriting: Zaner Bloser cursive Mathematics: Singapore Math Primary Standards 3 A and 3 B Finish Beast Academy 2 and start BA 3 Fan Math for additional problem solving (bar models & strategies); Math Detective (Critical Thinking Company) History: American Girl class at homeschool co-op; tagging along with big sister's history (ancients); Story of the World audio books Science: Stem Engineering class at homeschool co-op; tagging along with big sister's online chemistry and physics classes Religion: Devotions; reading and discussion of various books I have such as Wise Up! and books of parables, etc.; Sunday school class. Trying to decide if I want to start anything more formal at this point. Logic: Verbal and pictorial analogies (Critical Thinking Company books mostly); deductive reasoning puzzles. She loves logic!!!! Fine Arts: Art class at homeschool co-op; weekly piano lessons; audition community choir; ballet and tap dance Physical Education: Ballet and tap dance, swimming, horseback riding, general playing around........
  5. I can't decide if I want to stay with Singapore math or switch to CLE math with my upcoming 1st grader (6.5 yrs old). She's already finished Singapore 1A during her K year and it was pretty easy for her. I was going to just start her on 1B over the summer but then I have heard that Singapore math gets harder to teach as you move up the levels. So I thought maybe I'd switch to CLE math because I've used it before with my other kid and it seemed to be easy to teach, plus I like the spiral aspect. But I dont know if I want to switch now and just maybe start at lesson 40 or so, or just finish Singapore 1B then go into CLE math 2. I know their scope and sequence are a bit different. Or maybe just stay with Singapore. What would you do?
  6. We're working through Singapore Math 2A, using the CC edition. There are mental math pages (slips, really) in the back of the teacher's guide, but I can't find guidance anywhere about how to use them. I was using them for "sprints" in the early, easier lessons, but now that we're adding three-digit numbers with renaming, I think they're too challenging to use that way. (My kiddo has anxiety as it is!) Is this specific to the CC edition? Does anyone know how these pages are meant to be used?
  7. I am looking for some fun computer based options to reinforce Singapore Math. Any favorites? I have seen Dream Box mentioned quite a bit. Does this fit in well with Singapore Primary Math? Any recommendations? Apps or websites would be best. Thank you!!
  8. Singapore math also introduces order of operations very early. (But you probably already know that.) I can't remember what book they introduce it in. Maybe level 3 or 4? But then it is reviewed each year and practiced. (They just add decimal or fractions to the problems.) For you 10 year old son, I would NOT move him from Singapore just because he needs more practice. Especially if you are considering a STEM path for him. And especially because it is working well for him. :) And especially because you are almost finished with the primary math sequence...why not stick it through? (In full disclosure, i am a math snob, but I love Singapore math!) I agree with you that math mammoth is also a very strong math program, but sometimes the sheer amount of problems can kill a child's love for math. (Of course, you don't have to assign every problem in math mammoth. But I know from experience that it can sometimes be a lot of work to sort through and pick out your child's assignment each day. And I feel like the answer key in math mammoth makes grading more difficult than singapore.) So, let me ask you some questions (about the 10 year old specifically): Is he currently doing all of the textbook and workbook problems? (All of the reviews, practices, mental math for HIG, etc.) (If not, start doing both of those. That is the bare minimum.) Is he currently fixing his math each day and correcting missed problems until 100%? (That is an easy way to provide more practice, and from my experience a very useful tool in teaching math.) If he is currently doing both the textbook and workbook problems (and fixing his math each day), then it might be time to add in one of the extra Singapore books. The reason they have so many books is so you can completely customize the amount and type of practice your son needs and come up with a perfect math solution. Here are just a few of the most common "extra" books people order: Extra Practice books. These are going to be more problems just like the workbook. These are for kids who just need more practice of the same. Intensive practice / challenging word problems: These are for kids who don't find the regular workbook problems challenging enough. Process Skills: Does he need help with word problems or bar diagrams? Mental math books: self-explanatory Tests book: I know a lot of people who use the tests book for extra practice too. I feel like they are a bit easier than the regular workbook because many of the problems are multiple choice. But they are great, quick reviews. My kids also need a little bit of extra review and practice. I try my best to constantly keep sniffing out weak areas in their understanding. I use the cumulative textbook and workbook reviews (at the end of each unit in the standards version of Singapore) to snuff out any weak areas of understanding. If I notice that they are missing a lot of the same types of problems (or have forgotten how to do it and have to ask for a review)---then I re-teach the concept and start assigning 1-2 of those types of problems per day to practice. Another easy way to add in extra practice is Prodigy math. I don't know how you feel about screens, but it is a fun, online math video game that is actually pretty useful in reviewing math concepts. (It is NOT a good primary teaching tool.) It is free too. You can assign topics for targeted review (ex. order of operations, finding the area of different shapes, dividing fractions, etc.) or you can just have them work on grade specific spiral review.
  9. square_25, my older ds is on the extreme end of concept driven. I'm a science person, not a math person, so when he was little, we just played shop. I had no grand visions or pedagogical opinions, I just taught him about money, made up funny word problems, estimated stuff, played multiplication war, etc. Then, at the age of 6, having never been introduced to the concepts, he invented algebra, reasonably complex algebra. I had no idea that these thoughts were in his head, none. We had been playing shop. That is when I started reading up on how to teach him. But interestingly, he was extremely computation adverse. He *refused* drill, completely refused to do it. He seemed to only be able to practice his numeracy skills through complex 10 step word problems. It was at the age of 8 that he decided that all teaching was cheating, in fact, that all textbook explanations were cheating. I'm actually not sure how he learned fractions - he must have had insight and just confirmed his method by checking his answers in the back of the book, because he *refused* to be taught how to do it by me or by any written explanation. At the time he was working his way through the word problems in singapore math intensive practice. Over time, I came to believe that his mathematical skill was so high, that drill of any sort was the equivalent of proof-reading a phone book. You might have good intentions, but there is just no way you can actually *do* something so boring. However, this boy then took 3 years to get through AoPS intro algebra, and this slow speed just about gave me a heart attack. But he had to do it on his own. And he had to do it at his own pace. And he had to *derive* every. single. concept independently. But you know what, he was on the NZ IMO team at 15, and now is taking grad level math classes at MIT as a freshman. So his very strange path was apparently just right for him. My point is that you are mathy and your child is mathy. Perhaps there is just NO drill in her future. I remember my son memorizing his subtraction facts while concurrently working through AoPS algebra independently. Conceptually, he was far far far ahead, but when it came to *computation* he was very average. I've often wondered what would have happened to him if he had been forced to do math in school. My guess is that it would have drained the passion right out of him. I'm so grateful to be able to have offered him another path. Ruth in NZ
  10. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • For Sale
    • USED

    I have Singapore 1A and 1B texts ( and the homeschool instructor's guide) for $15 Singapore 1A and 1B texts (no guide) for $10 Singapore 2A and 2B texts for $10 Singapore 3A (with MFW's Lesson plans) and 3B for $12 Singapore 5A with the Homeschool Instruction Guide for $10 Prices include shipping All books have minimal wear and very little to no pencil marks/highlighting Paypal only email theciske6@gmail.com for further questions.

    $10.00

  11. There is an old post on this topic but the question I have is not included there so here's a new thread! We just switched over from Singapore Math U.S. edition to the Standards Edition. After completing U.S. 3b we now have the 4a Standards Edition. My daughter is in 4th grade. It seems so much harder for my daughter. For example the US edition had her rounding up a little bit, while in the first few pages of the Standards Edition, she is asked to round up to the nearest ten thousands place. A bit more complex. We made it through though :) Just wondering if I should give it some more time and let the new concepts sink in, or should I go back to the US edition. Anyone go through something similar? Maybe I switched books too late in the game? Any advice will be appreciated. Thank you, Christine
  12. I am looking for science for my middle two dds for next year. They will be in 7th and and 8th grades. I’d like to have them do the same science to simplify things for myself. I’d prefer Christian. Bonus points if it has an audio CD as my 7th grader is a struggling reader. She’s come a LONG way in the past year but my plan for next year already involves more reading than she’s used to and I don’t want to overwhelm her. Also, I need it to not be super teacher intensive. My DH and I are around and can be involved and help them but we have some other “stuff” that we’re dealing with right now so at least somewhat independent would be nice. I’m looking at the new Apologia General Science for them but would like to look at other options before I decide. I asked if there was a specific science topic they’d like to learn about this year but neither of them came up with anything. For reference, in the past we’ve enjoyed curricula like Story of the World, Notgrass, Apologia Young Explorers, Science in the Beginning, Logic of English, IEW, Singapore Math... Next year we’re trying some new things - MFW ECC (5th and 7th grades), and Ancient History and Literature (8th and 10th grades). The younger two will be doing LLATL for English. ....just to give you an idea of our “style”.
  13. I like the way word problems are done better with BJU than Singapore Math. Singapore Math relies on rod diagrams for everything where as BJU will use a variety of pictures. For example, one specific problem in Singapore Math has 6 children, each giving $5 for something. Then it makes a rod diagram with links marked off to show it is 5 parts, each equal to six. This is okay and fine. But I like how BJU shows six sets of five which could be counted. For teaching multiplication, BJU spends a fair amount of time on skip counting and showing how repeat adding is the same thing and also on showing the various properties, commutative and so on. I like a lot about Singapore Math. But then there are specifics I like a lot that I see in BJU. Like how it teaches long division. And the fact that it is pretty much all work book. As in, everything we use, I don't have to worry about copying problems from a textbook page like needs to be done with some of SM problems. I have also considered just using both programs. But that also seems like overkill. He is actually getting it with Singapore Math.
  14. When we had to have family step in to help with homeschooling (dd/cancer, another dd/NICU for an extended period), we had to keep things very simple and very minimal to actually get it done. Math: do the next lesson in the book. CLE math is very easy for a non-teacher to grade, Singapore math bar models caused my mom’s brain to melt, iykwim. Phonics: we went to workbooks—do the next lesson. Art: Artistic Pursuits kits with the accompanying supplies were a huge hit. Sonlight science kits (with supplies) were a huge hit for my elementary aged kids at the time. Basically, very clear assignments with all supplies included were the only things that got done. In terms of filling the time, SOTW audio history, Kumon books, and a basket of books helped. I would reserve them online and dh would do a library pickup weekly. My older children read a lot to the youngest because they had more tolerance for it. Also, be sure your sister can set up video chatting. Not only will it help maintain family bonds, but being available daily (at some point) to answer questions, ask accountability stuff (show me what you did in math today!) and to offer moral support was really helpful. We used FaceTime, but Skype is also great.
  15. My 5th grader (11) and my 4th grader (9) are both using Singapore 5A for math. (Just the normal workbook. Not the IP or CWP.) Daily, they miss more than half of their problems on their math workbook assignments. I am wondering if this is normal? If not, what can I do to correct it? I always grade their math right away and have them fix any problems they miss. And they typically can always fix them. (Sometimes it takes a few attempts.) Additional Information: They understand the math. They are just making mistakes. (Example: Subtracting incorrectly. Forgetting to add the digits that they carried when multiplying. Writing too sloppy. Etc. etc. ) This is not a new problem. This has been ongoing for years. Looking back on their past workbooks, they are missing more than half the problems each day for YEARS. (And then then they go back and fix until 100%.) My fear is that I have done something inadvertently to cause (or allow) careless work in math. If they are both doing the same thing, that probably means it is an instructional problem....right? Where did I go wrong, and what can I do at this point considering we might have some deeply ingrained bad math habits. :) I don't think the problem is specific to Singapore math. I've tried giving them worksheets from math mammoth, and the same thing happens. They even do the same thing with easier problems. For example, I even had them go back and complete the 4th grade math mammoth review workbook just to try and get them used to not being careless with easier problems. Daily, they still missed about half the problems and would do their math assignments twice. My concerns: Wasted instructional time: Today, for example, my 11 year old spent about 60 minutes to do 8 long division problems (with remainder). He got 3 of them correct. My 9 year old got 4 of them correct. That is less than 50%. So we graded the page and I had them fix the incorrect problems. They spent about another 45 mins fixing the math problems. Because they are getting so many incorrect, they essentially have to do their math assignments twice every day. That makes for a LOOOOOONG day for them. (And I am only assigning 8 problems!) I was hoping that fixing their math everyday and redoing it would eventually teach them to be careful and try their best the fist time, but that doesn't seem to be working. (After years of trying this same approach, I think I need to try something new.) In the past my theory has been that they just need more practice. So I have assigned them more problems of the same type. But the same thing just keeps happening day after day after day. Future math classes: Someday, they might need to take an outside class for math. I am worried that poor math habits will effect their grade. Imagine if they get a 40% on every homework assignment? Any other ideas on things I can do?
  16. My 5th grader (11) and my 4th grader (9) are both using Singapore 5A for math. (Just the normal workbook. Not the IP or CWP.) Daily, they miss more than half of their problems on their math workbook assignments. I am wondering if this is normal? If not, what can I do to correct it? I always grade their math right away and have them fix any problems they miss. And they typically can always fix them. (Sometimes it takes a few attempts.) Additional Information: They understand the math. They are just making mistakes. (Example: Subtracting incorrectly. Forgetting to add the digits that they carried when multiplying. Writing too sloppy. Etc. etc. ) This is not a new problem. This has been ongoing for years. Looking back on their past workbooks, they are missing more than half the problems each day for YEARS. (And then then they go back and fix until 100%.) My fear is that I have done something inadvertently to cause (or allow) careless work in math. If they are both doing the same thing, that probably means it is an instructional problem....right? Where did I go wrong, and what can I do at this point considering we might have some deeply ingrained bad math habits. :) I don't think the problem is specific to Singapore math. I've tried giving them worksheets from math mammoth, and the same thing happens. They even do the same thing with easier problems. For example, I even had them go back and complete the 4th grade math mammoth review workbook just to try and get them used to not being careless with easier problems. Daily, they still missed about half the problems and would do their math assignments twice. My concerns: Wasted instructional time: Today, for example, my 11 year old spent about 60 minutes to do 8 long division problems (with remainder). He got 3 of them correct. My 9 year old got 4 of them correct. That is less than 50%. So we graded the page and I had them fix the incorrect problems. They spent about another 45 mins fixing the math problems. Because they are getting so many incorrect, they essentially have to do their math assignments twice every day. That makes for a LOOOOOONG day for them. (And I am only assigning 8 problems!) I was hoping that fixing their math everyday and redoing it would eventually teach them to be careful and try their best the fist time, but that doesn't seem to be working. (After years of trying this same approach, I think I need to try something new.) In the past my theory has been that they just need more practice. So I have assigned them more problems of the same type. But the same thing just keeps happening day after day after day. Future math classes: Someday, they might need to take an outside class for math. I am worried that poor math habits will effect their grade. Imagine if they get a 40% on every homework assignment? Any other ideas on things I can do?
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  18. Have you heard of such a thing? My friend went to a local homeschool store to buy Singapore math and was told they don't carry it. She was fuzzy on the explanation, but came away with the impression it was for personal moral reasons of the owner of the shop. I hadn't heard of this, so I came here to find out if this was in any way a widespread problem. As in, if she goes to a different store, will she likely run into the same thing? (Bible belt here, if that matters)
  19. Hi, The subject pretty much sums up my question: Can anyone compare the three math programs listed above? Is there anyone using Singapore math for the logic and middle-grade years? If so, could you please give me a review? I am curious why so few people stick with Singapore after Primary Math. Singapore Math's website is notoriously hard to understand (as always).....but if I understand correctly, it looks like they are phasing out New Elementary Math. Is that correct? But Dimensions will still be around? If that is the case, I guess I can cross NEM off my list of options to research. :) The samples of Dimension look good...although they only let you see a few pages. SO----I am wondering why I don't hear of more people using Dimensions. My original plan was to move to AOPS Precalc after Singapore 5B. However, for some reason, I have a bad feeling about the transition. We tried Beast academy and it didn't work out as well as Singapore math. The problems in BA were so challenging that my kids needed me there the entire time. So it felt very teacher intensive. With Singapore, I can teach a short lesson, work a few examples from the textbook , and then send them on their way with the workbook. It is a nice balance of teacher-taught-time and independent work. Plus, my kids have done really well with Singapore. They are not especially gifted in math. However, they test well in math.... and perhaps more importantly at this age, they enjoy math. I worry that AOPS will frustrate them. (I've heard the Prealgebra book is very difficult.)
  20. I have never heard of Singapore Math Live--mind blown. I may need that in the next year or two.
  21. I have been reading posts from this forum, but this is the first time that I have posted. If anyone is searching for a math program, I just wanted to share this. I started with RightStart and Singapore Math. Later, by accident, I discovered Mortensen Math which is more tangible and fun, covering many math operations simultaneously. I hope that this review helps others in choosing a math program.
  22. Still trying to decide between Singapore primary mathematics and bju math for grade 1 for next year. We did Singapore this year for K and ds did great. I would love to do it for first, but I have 2 things holding me back and making me want something more traditional. 1. I worry I will struggle teaching the Singapore methods I'm not familiar with 2. I worry if/when he attends public school someday, he will be told the Singapore way is not right and he'll have to relearn the traditional way What are your thoughts on these things? Also, if I do attempt Singapore for first what happens if I don't love it and want to try something new for next year? Do you think a transition from Singapore to bju would be an easy one? Also, it seems there may only be a few "new weird math" instances for first grade, so assuming I just HATE the new method, could I just teach the traditional way I know and then move to a traditional math for next year? I know I can do anything I want, but you know what I'm saying. I'm asking would this be a good idea or not. I'd love to stick to one thing all the way through to avoid as many gaps as possible. I just like the look of primary mathematics better than bju. BJU just looks super busy and unnecessary to me. Primary Mathematics looks more to the point and I think ds and I would be fine with that.
  23. I will begin homeschooling my youngest grandson in the fall and I'm out of my element! So much information, so little time! We are pulling him out of public school due to problems with bullying. He always retaliates and gets in trouble so, instead of constant calls from the school, my daughter is pulling him. With only 5 weeks left, we are keeping out fingers crossed to finish out this year without any more incidents. Anyway, I feel relatively comfortable with Language Arts, Social Studies, etc. My concerns are, of course, Math and Science as they were not my best subjects in school myself. Any advise for a new homeschooler for curriculum that will grab him? He is smart...and I think some of his problems at school have also been due to boredom. I'm looking at Math Mammoth or Singapore Math. In Science, I believe we are going to concentrate on the Life Sciences this term. Any suggestions would be appreciated!
  24. My older ds finished AoPS PreAlgebra this past school year. He and I worked on it together with the videos (which we loved!) I’ve been considering putting him in an online class to free me up for my younger kids and a new baby coming this fall. I looked into AoPS online classes for Algebra 1, but didn’t care for the setup and thought the pace would be too much for my ds. I’ve since looked into other options and am wondering if anyone here has advice on which direction to take. 1) Dolciani Algebra 1 through Wilson Hill. Is Dolciani a decent choice for Algebra 1? I have heard Foersters get good reviews, as well as Jacobs. Any feedback on WHA Algebra 1? Is the digital writing tablet and the graphing calculator really necessary? 2) WTMA Algebra 1. Haven’t looked into this a lot, but they do offer an AoPS Algebra 1, I believe. 3) Do AoPS Algebra 1 ourselves. With the videos only covering through ch. 13, I believe. This makes me a little hesitant. We enjoyed AoPS a bunch, but it also took a lot of time. 4) Do Foersters or Jacobs Algebra 1 ourselves. Not familiar with these texts, but doubt they’d take as much time as AoPS. Or take the Jacobs course through Veritas Press Academy online school. Thoughts? Also, another thread got me thinking of my ds2. Regentrude mentioned making sure students write out their math work. I’m waffling on whether or not to do PreA with my ds2, and it’s precisely because of this issue. He is very intelligent and does so much math in his head. But he hates to write things down, which of course leads to silly mistakes. (Side note: he’s always struggled with the act of writing, and was “unofficially” diagnosed with dysgraphia by a special ed evaluator.) And when he does write things down, it doesn’t make sense to me. He likes to erase work he wrote, as if it’s clutter he doesn’t need anymore. It also is difficult sometimes in trying to follow his line of thinking- which is usually different, but nonetheless correct and rather creative. He has done Singapore Math Standards Ed. and Beast Academy and done very well in both. I’ve debated entering him in an online class for the same reasons for ds1, but the “won’t write things down” issue is making me think twice. Would an online class help him in this area?
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