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Found 1,662 results

  1. Classical as in well trained mind classical. Early grades have emphasis on history, phonics, poetry memorization, sentence diagramming, Singapore math (US edition) among other things. In sixth grade, they start learning Latin. 7th -8th grade is American history learning from founding fathers original documents. 9th and up, there is an emphasis on western thought starting with early Greek philosophers and Roman civilization ending with the 20th century. It is my ideal homeschool sequencing without having to actually do it. I do love what they are trying to achieve at this school and I want to get behind it to help it’s long term success. It just seems somewhat unimportant when you put it up against many of the social issues of our time. But, it’s what I know and am passionate about. I know that there are tons of educational models out there and all sorts of great people can graduate from those other models. But this type of school I personally believe in.
  2. Well, then you are quite lucky. Homework here means get out the homeschool materials. Singapore Math was wonderful, very efficient and that made homework fit into the time it was supposed to fit in to. No need to meet a tutor at the public library, as many have to do.
  3. I used Singapore and really liked it, it had a bit of number bonds early on but not many. Much of the common core math, like @ClemsonDana mentioned, looks like they took a few things from Singapore but didn't understand it, so badly implemented Singapore math. Singapore math is more incremental and logical, we had friends who had biological children who kept up fine after their private school switched from A Beka math to common core, but an adopted child who did not get much protein his first few years before adoption could not keep up with the jumps that were made in common core math, he had been doing fine with A Beka math. If his school does the normal sight words and balanced literacy, you may need to do some nonsense words in addition to normal phonics for reading. My syllables page has some tests at the end, the MWIA will show if you need nonsense words, he should not have a slowdown or miss more phonetic than holistic words, and should not miss more than a 2 - 3 words on either list. http://www.thephonicspage.org/On Reading/syllablesspellsu.html
  4. Is there a way to give a student who is weak in math the benefit of the Singapore math approach? Looking over samples, I really appreciate much that is practical and visual about this approach. I also greatly appreciate the approach to thinking skills. I understand that some of the materials move more at the pace of a student who is natural and quick at math. I understand that for some materials, it might be necessary to use supplemental books to give more practice. Cost is an important factor to me, and using multiple books is more expensive. So what I am asking: I have a beginning fifth grader who has been using a traditional program with a spiral approach. We are building on a foundation that is not sturdy, so to speak, and I realize that we need to go back and remediate. She needs to learn her multiplication tables. She also does poorly on math assignments. I believe that, were we to switch to a Singapore program, we could likely be set back as far as second grade. I gave a pretest for Math in Focus 3A, and she said it was too hard and wished to do the next test down. However, it looks from a sample I have seen that Math in Focus does a good job of laying out a concept in a visual way, not merely a verbal explanation or numerical formula. I believe this could be helpful. Yet going back into second grade would mean that the bit of ground we have been able to gain in multiplication, division, and working with fractions, might not be reviewed for a while, as we are instead working to build up basic problem solving skills. (I am not sure what the scope and sequence is, but it is probably quite different.) My idea was to use something like Math Mammoth (for which she places at Third Grade), and then use Math in Focus textbooks maybe starting at 2B as enrichment, to give a more visual aspect to the program and to help me learn something about how the Singapore Approach works, since I obviously was not trained this way. I do not feel I am "natural" at teaching math, such as improvising beyond what is in the curriculum I have. Sadly, but it is not my strong point. Does this sound workable to you, or is there a better way? I do feel a need to curtail costs, and I realize there may be some excellent math programs that are on the high end of the cost spectrum, but I really would not choose one of those. That may help as you give me your suggestions. Thank you!
  5. Didn't I read here that Singapore Math is going to do away with the 3 or 4 or however many different editions there are currently and write a single for US market version?
  6. Hello, everyone. Here's just a little backstory to my question: I have two school-aged children plus a preschooler (3 yrs old) and an almost 2 year old. I am due with our fifth in about a month. I have been using RightStart Math with my daughter (levels A-D), until I finally switched to Saxon at the end of this school year. I started my son with RightStart A in kindergarten this year. I felt like RightStart was a great choice for my daughter since she has ADHD and really needed a hands-on, out of the box approach. She learned the concepts really well and her mental math was impressive to me. I finally stopped using it when her conceptual understanding became significantly better than her ability to "just do the math" so to speak. In other words, she could grasp concepts that were at a very high level, but any number of simple subtraction facts would stall her for hours. She could multiply by "figuring it out" but not by remembering any facts of any kind, so it would take a VERY long time. What finally did me in, though, was the intensity of teaching RightStart. I just don't have it in me! Not with the little ones all around demanding my attention, etc. Once we switched to Saxon, her ability to use her concepts to actually do the drills went up exponentially. She's filling in the gaps and doing really well in math overall. So that is the long version of my experience teaching math thus far. So my question is for my son. We are finishing up his kindergarten year, and I have not felt like RightStart was as good a fit for him. I already kind of hate teaching it (such strong words!), but it seems, if anything, too out of the box for him. He's a traditional sort of fellow and all the manipulatives and tally marks, etc. seem to round about for him. He just wants to get to the adding, subtracting, and using actual numbers already. He also enjoys sitting down and using workbooks (which my daughter couldn't do at his age). All that to say, I've looked at Abeka and Horizons which seem similar in their approach (is that right??), and I've looked at Singapore. Singapore seems to enjoy a great reputation that I'm not sure the others share, and all three seem to be a sit-down workbook type of program. Can anyone tell me anything more in detail about working with these programs? Singapore is pretty darn confusing with their myriad of textbook options. I feel like I should go with them since I keep hearing about it being better, but I'm not sure if it really is and if it is also a more "out of the box" kind of curriculum or not. My two goals are to find something that is really easy to use and something that doesn't re-invent the wheel but gives a rock solid math foundation. Since I'm just spinning in circles at this point, I would love it if someone could give me some advice from their own experience! Thank you so much!!!
  7. The local schools are terrible, coasting off high SES parents and an abundance of tutoring centers. I wish we could home school but my partner refuses, so we afterschool. Singapore Math a couple days a week, handwriting one or two days a week, and then lots of reading around bedtime, especially when they're first learning. I ensure a steady feed of history and "quality" children's lit showing up on our bookshelves, and do my best to interest them in it.
  8. Hits: IEW Fix it Grammar, I bought the whole series I love it so much. SWI A, My son is actually writing with this! Praise God! Singapore Math Evan Moor's Building Math Fluency Series https://www.evan-moor.com/p/562/building-math-fluency-grade-3 Mystery Science Misses: All About Spelling for DS8, he is just not getting it. He is still spelling words wrong by the end of the week. Lord help me! I need to find a spelling program for this boy that works.
  9. I'm going to say my opinion on this..... thank God she has memorized her addition facts. Yay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! But it doesn't mean she has got all the good connections and addition knowledge you would want her to have. She may need to go back and do some other earlier addition things now, to help make the connections. Because now that she has them memorized -- maybe that will really help some other things click. But you can't assume that because she has them memorized, that you can move forward from there. Unfortunately all those things people who think memorizing math facts are bad, are true. She probably still does need to work on those things. But hopefully she will get more out of it now. Because I think it is a really good working memory support to have them memorized and then go from there, to being able to do some of those mental math-y composition/decomposition things etc etc etc. All those good Singapore math things, but maybe from back in 1st or 2nd grade. Because there's a really good chance, enough time has passed, that she hasn't really retained all that really well because she wasn't building as good of connections. Now she can build better connections. And review can also really help to cement things and be a good thing to do.
  10. We have been using Singapore/Primary Mathematics, standards edition since we started homeschooling my daughter in 2nd grade. She is now about to be a 6th grader and I'm a little stuck on what to do this year. I would love to hear some input from some of you seasoned homeschool parents! A little background on my daugher: she is a very advanced reader and her strongest subjects are literature and history. She doesn't love math. Singapore Math has been wonderful, but she does get frustrated sometimes with the problems in the workbook/tests. She is a child who would prefer you give her a formula, and a specific way of solving a math problem, that can be directly applied to a related problem. Some of the Singapore problems require a little creative thinking (which I love, and I think is good for her). I would say she has maintained a strong "B" average this past year. The problem is that Primary Mathematics standards edition does NOT have a HIG for year 6. There is a teacher's guide, but from what i understand, is very different than the HIG and not as helpful. I have other children to homeschool, so I really don't want to get myself into a situation where math requires more involvement and planning than I've been used to. I was wondering if I should: 1.) consider using Primary Mathematics U.S. Edition for grade 6 (which comes with a HIG), or 2.) should i start with a pre-algebra/algebra curriculum? And, if so, which one? Thank you so much for any input and insight!
  11. I have read quite a few discussions about Singapore Math on this forum. Many have acronyms like MIF, CWP, HIG, etc. I have compiled an outline here. Hope it helps. The Singapore Math curriculum was conceptualized by the Ministry of Education in Singapore. It became popular worldwide due to its consistent top ranking on Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS). The early adopters are home school students. Currently Singapore Math is used in 100 over US school districts. The math learning process comprises three steps which are: concrete, pictorial, and abstract. The concrete step refers to students learning through manipulation of objects like pens, erasers or clips. In the next step, pictorial representations like bar models are used to represent the problem. The syllabus is about 1 year ahead of syllabus in other countries. For example primary 3 may be equivalent to elementary 4 in other countries. The most challenging word problems are those related to pre-algebra. Textbook titles with US Edition are listed here below. The titles not only have textbooks but they also have workbooks, home instructor guides and teacher’s guides. Dimension Math by Singapore Math Inc Math in Focus by Marshall Cavendish, reseller Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Challenging Word Problems by Marshall Cavendish Primary Math Marshall Cavendish In addition to workbooks, students/instructors can tap on worksheet question banks in free test papers -> Sg Math, for challenging word problems. Grades 4 to 6 are extremely challenging. About Marshall Cavendish is a Singapore-based textbook publisher whose publication are used in Singapore schools. Singapore Math Inc is an US publisher that adapted the curriculum to the American education market
  12. Singapore Math uses number bonds but doesn't belabor them and doesn't involve tons of drawing (I help at an afterschool program where many of the kids' homework is Eureka). It might feel familiar but not focus on the stuff that he hates...and if you're starting with second grade, there's only a little bit in the beginning - I think they were done with them after that. Eureka always feels like badly implemented Singapore Math to me.
  13. Hits: Typetastic Catholic Heritage Curricula Handwriting Year 3 (cursive) Evan Moor Building Spelling Skills Home-made Fairy Tales unit study using If the Wolf Were an Octopus (RFP) and Tales of Wonder (Circe Press) and lots of picture books Daily Mental Math Tin Man Press Start Thinking Grade 3 Singapore Math Story of Civilization Part 2 The Medieval world Scratch (on my own curriculum based partially on the Scratch coding cards) - this is by far their favorite thing we are doing. Misses: Writing and Rhetoric Fable - I had really hoped that this would jumpstart our writing in third grade but it has not worked for us. We are about 3 lessons in and I'm seriously considering jumping ship. The problem is I have no idea what to jump ship to. The Jury is Out: Beast Academy - I really loved 2A-2D, but the kids continue to complain about it. And they absolutely hated the online component - they prefer the practice pages. Memoria Press Latina Christiana - My husband likes it and is teaching it, but the kids vacillate between being excited to do something with Dad and hating the amount of work required to learn a language, especially Latin.
  14. Let me say first that I know nothing about SM wb and IP. I'm guessing that SM is Singapore Math, wb is a workbook, and IP is something related of a challenging nature (Interesting Problems?, Impossible Propositions?, Intriguing Puzzles?). Would it be possible for the child working independently, for example, at SM level 5 to also work independently at a lower level IP, for example, level 3? Regards, Kareni
  15. Saxon is a secular and popular math option. Singapore Math needs to make sense to YOU, first. All in ones: Calvert School, Laural Springs School, Oak Meadow, k12 (you may have the option to use them as a charter school for free), Keystone School has elementary through high school options. https://www.keystoneschoolonline.com Timberdoddle has secular packages. Pandia Press has a facebook page which will link you with hundreds of other secular only homeschoolers. PP publishes secular history and science. Another excellent place to start is Cathy Duffy's Review website. And of course, a lovely copy of The Well-Trained Mind. https://cathyduffyreviews.com/# Welcome to the Board!
  16. Hello, Earthmerlin. I don't know those programs to learn French. I used Yabisí Español Santillana for two years because I was able to buy them online and receive them in the US by mail. We used them slowly, skipping a few sections in every chapter. Unfortunately, I discovered them too late; because of that, my son's interest level didn't match its lessons, so I decided to stop using the program. We sometimes used the Mexican books published by the Secretaría de Educación Pública (SEP), which are available online for free and include "Español", "Lecturas", Math, History, Science, P.E., and Art for every grade, The vocabulary in "Lecturas" was too advanced for my son, so I read some parts aloud, and he read the shorter and easier sections aloud. We used Singapore Math until 5th. grade, then Beast Academy, and now AoPS. We read the text and numbers in English and always discuss in Spanish how to solve the exercises, so my son's Math Vocabulary is still richer in Spanish than in English. He even memorized the multiplication tables in Spanish. I didn't find a way to teach him spelling in Spanish, and thought that studying Latin would cover grammar, vocabulary, and spelling in two languages (and several more). I read aloud fiction and non-fiction almost every day, and ask him to read aloud simpler texts. He reads very well in Spanish but is faster in English, so he prefers reading novels in English. I will keep trying. If you find a good way to teach spelling, please let me know. Some copy work and dictation may be enough, plus reading aloud to your child and asking him/her to read aloud and write with some frequency.
  17. We would probably struggle to do several different things for each subject each day. We make index cards for everything that I want to do in a week - if I want to do singapore math 4 days, then I write 'singapore math' on 4 different cards, and if I want to do life of fred 3 days, then I write 'life of fred' on 3 cards. I write out all of the cards and let the kids separate them into stacks for each day of the week. Then, every morning, they get the stack and work through each subject. For subjects divided into lessons or chapters, it's easy for them to figure out what to do - we do 1 lesson of math, or read 2 chapters of history, for instance. Some subjects obviously require multiple assignments - spelling, grammar, and literature as part of language arts - but we've found that, with the exception of quick, fun things like balance benders or mind benders workbooks, it's best not to have too many different things going on every day for any subject. We lose time switching gears. In your situation, I wouldn't do more than 2 math things each day. Singapore can be done 4 days/week, LOF 1 day, with facts practice 2 days and games 3 days (or whatever combination gets you through what you want to do). Then let your kids choose which 2 things to do which days of the week and stick with that schedule. One of mine prefers to front-load the week so Fridays are easy - that kid would do Singapore M-Th and facts practice M/T and then do LOF of fred on F and games W-F. My other kid would try to avoid having 2 hard things on the same day, so would probably minimize over lap between facts and Singapore. We also don't schedule multiple writing assignments on the same day - if we write for a co-op composition class on Monday, then we put writing papers for me for history on Friday. Good luck finding a plan that works for you.
  18. Are you all saying you recommend skipping Singapore Math 6A and 6B and doing a pre-algebra program or dimensions? I already own the textbooks for SM level 6, but am not opposed to going a different direction at that level.
  19. Hmm...we are still using some Michael Clay Thompson grammar and Daily Grammar even though we don't always do them every year (this is a year we are). Things we'll probably come back to are Ellen McHenry and Singapore Math (brief switch to Math Mammoth because we were using US Edition, and I want my son to have a smoother transition to Dimensions Math in 7th). We have also been using Notgrass consistently, though we didn't use it our first year. We have other repeats, particularly with supplements, but as for what we started with, that's probably all that's been carried through. We didn't start in K with our first one, and they are 4 grades apart, so there are times when we have gaps between one child finishing a resource and then next aging into it.
  20. We will be doing pre K, K and 2nd grade math. Do I need the teacher's Manuals? Do I even need the textbook or can I get away with just the workbooks?
  21. I wanted to switch to BJU. I like what I was using just fine and feel it is a quality program, I just want to do something different. We have been using Singapore Math. Since son is 4th grade age for this fall, I bought the 4th grade book for fall. But when looking over it, I have found he actually has already covered most of what is in it. I thought I would give him a quiz, to see what he already knows or remembers. But when I attempted this, he wanted to know why he was doing school work during the summer. I told him it was just a quiz to see what he remembers and home school does not stop during the summer. He did not do any of the problems completely correct. I gave him 5 divided in to 681 and he did complete it correctly but I did have to remind him what to do in the middle. It was a small hint. He clearly just needed a reminder. Then I gave him 0.57 times 4 and he solved it but never put in the decimal place. Are these normal errors one would expect to see going in to 5th grade anyway so move on to the 5th grade book? I can see from looking at the topics that we pretty much covered everything in the 4th grade book in the past. Or should I figure we should just do the 4th grade year? Or, alternatively, just say it is a really bad idea to switch and stick it out with Singapore Math (US edition).
  22. Ds learned his math facts at 13. We hit it from every direction for years and years. Ronit Bird. Education unboxed. Drill games. Math families singapore math style. The thing that worked was memorizing strings of numbers---for whatever reason 6x7 couldn't stick, but memorizing 6,12,18,24,30,36,42 did..... We started with 10s, then did 5s, then 2s, and branched up. My point is, it's possible to find something that works even when it's very difficult.
  23. I just have a question about this. I have always used the Primary Edition (US Edition, but do have some 3rd editions). My daughter is in 1st grade at a school that uses Math In Focus. She is bringing home work such as...middle of the school year, first grade... 528+257. She had regrouping in subtraction and addition, up to three digits, in mid first grade. Now, a couple weeks ago, she was bringing home mental math to the effect of 34+56. In my Singapore Math 1B book..the mental math was more along the lines of adding 9's and 8's and kept to adding in single digits. There were no charts that showed to add the tens first and then the ones like in the Singapore Math book. The 34+56 type problems were in 3A and beginning of 3B. I am wondering if it is possible that the teacher has made her own worksheets and maybe did not realize the progression? I know the teacher told me that she used Saxon math when she was growing up and preferred. Honestly, based on what I am seeing, I think I might prefer Saxon over MIF.
  24. My seven year old son LOVES reading- he is a voracious reader and will read anything he can get his hands on. His favorites have been Harry Potter (he is just finishing book two, and we will stop him after that for now as the books get darker in nature), The Chronicles of Narnia, and he also loves more twaddley books like Dog Man and Captain Underpants. He is learning cursive (so far, he hates it), is on 3a of Singapore Math. He does NOT love Math, but he is very good at it. He loves science, nature and the outdoors. As for cartoons, his favorites are Teen Titans and Gumball. He also loves Minecraft (though were severely limit his access to any electronics) and LEGO. He spends a lot of time riding his bike and hanging out with his dog. He also loves his PE class where he can hang out with all of his friends for a couple of hours.
  25. Hi. I posted last week about DD (age 11) who will be in sixth grade. We’ve been doing Singapore standards and just finished grade 5. I initially started to look for another curriculum because Singapore standards doesn’t have an HIG. And we then started to consider pre algebra. Now that DD has heard my husband and I talk about the possibility of doing pre algebra, she really want to try it. I had her take the AOPS readiness test, which says you should get 22/26 to be ready. She scored 21/26 ... one of those incorrect answers was a silly multiplication mistake (she knows her mult facts) and the other 4 were adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers, which we just haven’t covered yet. I would say she has been a solid B student in Singapore math. I have spent hours reading through threads about prealgebra and I’m admittedly overwhelmed. I am also not a super mom like some of you who can teach from multiple books and curricula! AOPS is so interesting to me. Could a B math student thrive with that curriculum? Video text was also recommended by someone at rainbow resource, but I can’t find much info about it. Math Mammoth was recommended here, as well... Recommendations and opinions are so appreciated!
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