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Noreen Claire

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Everything posted by Noreen Claire

  1. We had our (now) 2yr old seen for severe tongue ties at 6wks old. The ENT at Boston Children's Hospital tried a procedure in the office, covered by insurance, that required two other providers to help, me to hold the baby, and it bled like crazy. Also, it didn't work. He recommended the next-step-up procedure, also fully covered by insurance, that would have included anesthesia (and an anesthesiologist), a surgical suite, 3 more providers, and serious bleeding complications. Instead, We went to Dr. Kotlow in Albany, NY. He's a pediatric dentist, uses a laser, and is the most *highly recommended* tongue tie doctor in the country. The entire procedure took less than 15 minutes, including swaddling the baby, taking before and after pictures, and printing me the pictures to take with me. It cost $500 out of pocket, which I successfully recovered from my insurance company about 6 months later. We went back with my (then) 3yr old (now 4), who has speech issues (attends therapy twice a week) and also had some decay issues on his front teeth due to his previously undiagnosed tongue ties. Both issues were corrected with the same laser at the same appointment. His speech is improving a year later, his decay issues are all gone, and it cost less than $1000 out of pocket. (He required ketamine sedation - he did NOT want any part of the dentist!) I highly recommend lasers over surgery. Neither child had any sensitivities or issues with healing after the laser. No blood at all. It was a 3hr drive (one way) and made for a long day, but it was definitely worth it.
  2. You could check out the lists that Mr. Money Moustache has blogged: http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/07/25/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-1/ and http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/08/05/50-jobs-over-50000-without-a-degree-part-2/ They are mostly focused on jobs that don't require college degrees, but some might fit the bill for your situation.
  3. In MA we have to the equivalent of 180 days or 900 hours (2nd grade). We will follow the public school schedule during the majority of the year, as DH is a school teacher, with 1/2 day Wednesdays for field trips, two weeks off for birth of new baby, one week for Thanksgiving, and two weeks at Christmas. With #5 due in October, I've modified our year to run September through August, but not all subjects will happen at the same time. Some subjects will get 37 weeks, some will get 34 weeks. Sept - Dec: Start with the subjects he can easily do with little help needed from me... (DO handwriting, spelling, grammar, math) Jan - Jun: Add in remaining subjects, now that life with baby has *hopefully* settled down... (DO handwriting, spelling, grammar, math, reading, writing, history, science, art/music, religion) Jul - Aug: Fall subjects should be finished; finish remaining subjects. DH will be home to help... (DO reading, writing, history, science) Hope that makes sense!
  4. We have this issue, only much worse because we have: hand towels, cloth napkins, kitchen towels (for drying hands & dishes) kitchen cleaning towels, 'shop' towels (grease, garage stuff, painting clean-up, etc), AND cloth diaper wipes. I am constantly having to move towels around to their proper destinations after someone else puts them away. I might be a little....obsessive. :willy_nilly:
  5. My sister-in-law (husband's sister) has always had very wiry and frizzy red hair. The color is beautiful, but the frizz was awful. She had a keratin treatment a while back and it was GORGEOUS! I couldn't stop staring at how smooth and beautiful it made her hair look. It was still curly, just smoooooooooooth. My other sister-in-law (brother's wife) is a hair dresser and does them all the time. She's been trying to talk me into one for years but, every time I get to the point where I am just about to agree, I just cut it short again. Less work for me. (I joke that I can rock an "Irish afro" like nobody's business.)
  6. I agree - on principle. However, as a first-year teacher in a new school system, she may be required to do some worksheet-type stuff (letters/numbers/other pre-writing skills, etc.) that the school requires. This could lighten her load a bit in that she won't have to reinvent the wheel while she's still learning to drive the car. Pre-made worksheets were invaluable to me the first few months that I was teaching. I got away form it quickly, but it was helpful when I needed it.
  7. I second the gift card to Teachers Pay Teachers. I would add a gift card to Target or the Container Store (or maybe even the local dollar store), as she'll need lots of organizational items for her new classroom!
  8. My 7yr old just finished 1st grade in a public school, and we are working through the 1st grade books (he finished the 1A textbook on Friday) over the summer before we start homeschooling 2nd grade in September. From what I can tell, the biggest difference between the two versions is that the Standards version has cumulative reviews and the Common Core version has just chapter reviews, which are not cumulative. That's pretty much it. If you look at the comparison chart mentioned above, there is actually *very little* difference in topics covered in the two versions, Standards or Common Core [C], until you get to 5th grade, where a few geometry and statistics topics, and all algebra topics, are pushed up into 6th grade. This is because the Common Core standards focus on a more rigorous understanding of all concepts prior to algebra, and allow a bit longer for kids to master those concepts. Also, the Common Core standards recommend not beginning algebra until 8th/9th grade, as many children are not conceptually ready for those topics and, speaking personally as a high school mathematics teacher, many public and private schools do not have the math specialists in the classrooms who are able to provide the instruction necessary for students to really know and be comfortable with pre-algebra concepts. Ask me how many teenagers I had to reteach fractions and multiplication/division to. Actually, don't, you'll make me need a drink. :crying: THIS MAY BE DIFFERENT WITH HOMESCHOOLED CHILDREN, especially those whose parent are NOT math phobic. If you are strong/comfortable in *your* math abilities, it really doesn't matter which book you choose at 2nd grade - you can always switch as you learn more about *your child's* math abilities. However, if you feel in any way shaky in your own middle school math topics, you may want to lean towards the Common Core books, as those will provide more explanation, practice, and time for your child (and yourself!) to master the topics before getting to algebra. FWIW, I'm a proponent of the Common Core math standards, especially at the elementary level. And I'm from MA, where we regularly test higher than many *countries* in our students' math ability. We were also known to have had the most rigorous state math standards in the US before we helped to design and adopt the CC standards. EDITED TO ADD: The Common Core version doesn't have a Home Instructor's Guide (HIG). That might be a deal-breaker for many parents. Sorry, I forgot about that part.
  9. We have this setup, too! We may make it into a triple (if new baby is a girl) by adding one of their metal loft beds *above* the kura bunks. I've seen it a few times on pinterest, and have the directions pinned somewhere...
  10. With episodes happening mostly in the mornings, I would guess that her nighttime dosage would need to be upped to make it last longer into the mornings, until her morning dosage kicks in. My son (now 20, diagnosed at about 12) takes a higher dosage in the mornings because he mainly had episodes later in the afternoon/evening hours. Switching back/forth between medicines quickly, without weaning (slowly) off of one while starting (slowly) a new one is a recipe for disaster - I would find a specialist at a major children's hospital or neurological center. We spent several years trying to get the dosages right, and every time we thought we had it he would have a growth spurt and we would have to start all over. He's on Keppra and Depakote and at 20 was finally able to start driving lessons, after having gone 12 months+ w/o a seizure. He has had both partial complex and tonic-clonic (grand-mal) seiures. Good luck to you and your family in getting this under control.
  11. We have 4 kids and 1 on the way and we just moved into a 3-bedroom, 1500sq ft house with a nice little yard a finished basement with a 3/4 bath. The oldest (DS20) chose the basement. The younger 3 are in one room upstairs, one room is the 'office', and the largest room is ours. One full bath, one half bath, one 3/4 bath (in basement). We are currently trying to come up with plans for what happens to the younger boys when the new baby comes... If it is a boy, we could do 2 each in the bedroom and lose the office, or we could put all four in the big bedroom (if it is a boy). If it is a girl, most likely she'll get a room to herself and the 3 boys will have to stay together. Though, as they are all expected to be 6ft+ tall, they may end up in the big bedroom anyway... *sigh*
  12. Only one house for sale like that in my city - $600k. Next town over (greater household income area) - $1M+. FWIW, I'm 25min north of Boston. Go 15 minutes south, closer to Boston, the prices start to go up exponentially. Go 15 minutes north, over the border into NH, and the price drops dramatically.
  13. Has he had his eyes checked recently? Being slightly cross-eyed could lead to nausea and vomiting. It's an easy check in the pediatrician's office to see if there is anything off with his eyesight and get referred to an ophthalmologist. Good luck.
  14. My husband's coworker was horrified by the fact that my oldest had to walk to/from high school because there are no buses if you live within 1 mile of the school. I thought it was fabulous, and that it should include middle schoolers, too. Of course, she's still doing her 20yr old son's laundry...
  15. I have been known to insist that my oldest (over 18 at the time) walk the 3 miles to work (60 minutes, via the shortest route) if it were terribly inconvenient for me to drive him at the time. To be brutally honest, he was at the tail-end of a period of his life where he was *actively* trying to screw his life up so that he didn't have to have a job/graduate from HS/get his license/etc. It was a tough period, but it's thankfully over. FWIW, I was allowed, around 8th or 9th grade, to walk that far on my own, pre-cell phones, to my best friend's house, if I so wanted to go and there was no one around to drive me. Mostly busy streets, all with sidewalks, etc.
  16. We aren't up to SOTW4 yet, but have you checked out the book lists from the Classical House of Learning Literature? Her website is closed, but her files are still up for (free) downloading. https://classicalhouseoflearning.wordpress.com/2016/01/10/new-links-website-is-closed/
  17. Go down to the water and rent a kayak! So much fun!
  18. My best friend (the one who got me into cloth diapers) has really, really, really hard water. She only ever used CountrySave. She ordered it through Amazon by the case to save on shipping. I have used all the fancy, 'cloth-diaper specific' detergents (I owned a small cloth diaper store for a few years - I tried them all) and I settled on the giant tub of powdered Arm & Hammer detergent you can get from the local club store (that would be BJs here). I use it for everything, diapers and clothes. In a pinch, you can just wash with a squirt or two of the original blue Dawn dishsoap, with extra rinses to get rid of the suds. Good luck! Edited to add: My cloth diaper stash doesn't have any microfiber; it's all cotton & PUL. My mama cloth does have microfiber in it - if it starts to get a little stinky, I just throw a splash of bleach into the next load of wash. YMMV.
  19. Still waiting for this in my house. Thirteen was seven years ago ... it's been a loooong ride.
  20. This is great advice! I'm going to add in some phonics/pre-writing activities in the fall with boy #3 and I was wondering how I would keep boy #4 busy during that time. I didn't realize that I could just schedule in time for boy #2 to play/read to him! Awesome! Thanks! :hurray:
  21. It is set to run this way to be less expensive. You can turn it off, on this phone and on any other phone, but the way Republic Wireless runs is to use wifi for all calls/data/texts as first choice. Most other phones DO NOT run their calls/texts off of wifi, just the data. That's where Republic Wireless is different. I'm not concerned about being hacked. Their have been no known instances of this happening to RW customers, as far as I know.
  22. The phone *prefers* to work on wifi, and is preset to smell out the wifi, if it can find it. (If wifi is free, then it saves money this way.) When I'm in the car, or somewhere else that doesn't have wifi, the phone switches over to cell service. All calls/texts are free, and I use my data if I do things like search the web, use twitter, or use my gps. The phone works everywhere, all the time - it switches seamlessly back and forth between wifi and cell to be the most cost-effective it can be. Sorry I was confusing before!
  23. I got a black henna tattoo (at a Lilith Fair concert so long ago it seems like another life!) that burned and scarred me for years. That stuff is evil...
  24. This sounds like it might help, thanks. I can't seem to work the knife in my left hand to show him how to work it. He uses his left better than his right, so when he tries to copy me it's frustrating to him.
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