Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Noreen Claire

Members
  • Content Count

    1,207
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Noreen Claire


  1. 24 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

    Do your kids choose the order that they work through things?

    With DS7 (2nd grade), we alternate choosing- I pick the first subject and then give him options for him to pick the next subject, depending on if he needs me or can work independently, and repeat as we go. He tends to march to his own drummer, and definitely needs plenty of time during the day to work on his own projects, follow his own rabbit trails, and read.

    With DS10 (5th grade), he will very rigidly work straight down the list, so I have organized it in a way that makes best use of hard/easy/hard/easy tasks for him, so that I can also give him breaks/snacks/physical activity during the day to keep him going. He is advanced in a couple of subjects, but also has anxiety and other issues.


  2. 18 hours ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


    I don't suppose you'd be willing to send me a photo?  I'm curious to see these planners, because I do think we need something written. 

    I'm not sure what 8's planners look like, but I'll show you what my planners for DD10 and DS7 look like for this week. 

    I do have a beautiful schedule all worked out for when each kid (10, 7, 5, & 3) is doing what activity, trying to balance out who needs help and who can work by themselves. Of course, no one follows it except DS10, who has a rigidity when it comes to schedules. Everyone else just kind of goes with the flow... 

    IMG_20200210_091208227.jpg

    IMG_20200210_093357558.jpg


  3. 1 minute ago, Ktgrok said:

    Because carrying around the cash tends not to happen, but I could have their debit card in my wallet so if they spot something at the store they can use it, rather than us trying to track me paying for it, then them paying me back. Or alternately, me not having cash on hand to pay them for a chore that they did, so then I owe them. So right now, I owe my 7 year old 9 dollars. I think. He's says it is 9 dollars, and he's pretty good about that, and I can't remember exactly how much after he did a few chores I said I'd pay for, but then I used my card to buy stuff on target because he didn't have his wallet, etc etc. 

    The ones I'm looking at have apps so the kid can basically have a budget set up - at a minimum they have separate spend/save categories, some have even more options. 

    If we had one of these then when a kid say, cleans my baseboards for $2 I can instantly transfer the money from my account to their account. And I can set up on some of them a set percentage of their money to go to savings, giving, etc. 

    That makes sense. I rarely take my kids to the store with me unless it's a special trip with just one kid, so they can take their money with them because we know ahead of time and they have an idea of what they want to spend it on. 

    Also, my DH always has cash (I rarely do!), and is almost always able to immediately pay out allowances or chore payments, so I never have to think about that part! If that weren't the case, an app/debit card might make it much easier.


  4. I just took my 10, 7, & 5 year olds to the credit union to deposit their allowance money and exchange coins for paper money (they like the machine counter). I think it's beneficial for kids to handle cash, like counting, splitting between save/spend/donate, pre-planning to have enough money for outings, etc. Though, my credit union would issue a debit card for each kid's account if I wanted. Is there a specific reason you prefer kids to have a debit card? Asking honestly...

    • Like 1

  5. First, I am so sorry that this has happened to your daughter, and also that she had to go back to work so quickly after giving birth.

    My oldest has had seizures since childhood, but is male, so no clue about preeclampsia-related seizures. However, if she does get prescribed Keppra *specifically*, please make sure she also gets prescribed vitamin B6 to take concurrently. Keppra can have an adjustment period that includes rage, anger, depression, and/or anxiety. Vitamin B6 can help mitigate these side effects. (We have lived this experience.)

    Good luck to your daughter. May she recovery quickly.


  6. 4 minutes ago, maize said:

    Do you have room for a six foot trampoline? Might keep the kids busy without needing to drive to the YMCA. And you'd have funds left over.

    We do. However, DS10 has already broken his arm once and I remember, waiting during the procedure to straighten the bones, reading all of the literature on how trampolines ARE THE DEVIL and ever since they scare the crap out of me! My brother (not quite 6ft tall) flipped almost completely out of safety surround of one once - he got caught on the netting on the way down, thank goodness!

    • Like 1

  7. Just now, maize said:

    You haven't managed a household? Raised children?

    How the heck is that not work?!?

    What is it about the fact that your labor is unpaid that means it is not a major contribution to your family and to the world?

    How does putting in thousands of hours without monetary remuneration make you undeserving of spending money that is legitimately yours?

    The value of our life work is not measured by how much money someone pays us for it. And the fact that you are not earning money in no way makes you unworthy to use money for your very own personal priorities.

    Yes I am giving that guilty voice in your head a lecture!

    Yes, yes! I have this conversation with my BFF every few months; she says the same things. I know this stuff, but... I worked as a single mom with multiple jobs, finishing my BS and getting my Masters, raising one kid and running my own household, all by myself for 10+ years. DH and I have been married for nearly 11 years and I left the workforce 8 years ago. I *still* have money issues - not bringing in my own income and having to discuss/rationalize purchases with DH is still a sore spot for me. I'm working on it, but it isn't easy!

    • Like 3

  8. Thanks for your responses so far!

    We don't "need" the money to pay bills/debt (though, if you asked Mr. Money Mustache, he would beg to differ). However, as I have only worked for one semester out of the last 8 years, I feel guilty spending money on myself. 

    1 hour ago, maize said:

    I'd stick half of it in savings to boost my much-too-small emergency fund and use the rest for whatever I had been wanting to do and couldn't afford--probably something for the kids because that's what brings me joy.

    I like the "both" method! Win-win for everyone!

     

    1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

    I found $50 in my 9th grade textbook many years later. Stuff it in there to straighten the note. Whatever money I find that I know is mine for sure goes into fun money for me. $400 would be more than I need to spend at one time so I would use it to get a big ticket want item like DSLR camera lens and hopefully have some cash left for frappes or bubble tea.

    There is always something that I really want ... up until I have the money, then I can't bring myself to spend it on myself!

     

    1 hour ago, Rosie_0801 said:

    Half would sit and wait for my friend to finally agree to go to the black smithing class a few towns over, and the other half would get dd and I down to the beach to explore rock pools before the summer is over.

    That sounds excellent!

     

    1 hour ago, mmasc said:

    Honestly? I’d buy myself the $170 Ecco shoes that I really want and wouldn’t spend that kind of money on even though they’re very good-for-your-feet shoes. Not sure what I’d do with the rest though. 

    Oh...I could really use some new shoes. That's an idea.

     

    1 hour ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

    I would just put it in the bank.  
     

    I'm afraid that I would just nickle-and-dime it out, and it would be gone and I wouldn't have anything to show for it.

     

    1 hour ago, Beth S said:

    Windfalls are easy to spend.
    I've read that it's best to splurge with 5% of the amount, & use the rest for debt payoff or retirement fund.
    Most advise to sit on the $$ for at least a month & think about the wisest way to spend it.

    Waiting is a good idea. I will make a note in my calendar to make a decision in a week or two.

     

    1 hour ago, Ottakee said:

    I would first make sure that I had a solid emergency fund.  Then maybe spend $50-100 and invest the rest or possibly use it for vacation.

    I was just talking to DH about possibly going away for a weekend together...

    1 hour ago, Katy said:

    I'd put it in my Amazon account and buy myself whatever I wanted until it was gone.

    This would buy a lot of books an loose-leaf tea for me on Amazon, that's for sure!

     

    1 hour ago, sassenach said:

    This is so frivolous but we had that happen last year and I bought Taylor Swift concert tickets with it 😂. Two of them were for Christmas but one was for ME. 

    Hope you enjoyed the show!

     

    1 hour ago, Bambam said:

    It would totally depend upon our financial situation. If we had overwhelming bills with high interest rates, I'd probably pay it towards them. If we had no debt, I'd probably save it. If I only had one kid, I'd possibly help them buy a car, but if I had multiple kids, I wouldn't unless I could afford to help them all that much on buying their cars. 

    But I'm not big on things, and practicality wins on most things. 

    Oldest DS has been driving a totaled car for about a year, and this would be a huge help to him. The next kid won't be old enough to drive a car for 5+ years and has already started saving for a first car, so not a problem.

     

    59 minutes ago, TheReader said:

    Well, normally, I'd say "go shopping" and buy whatever thing. For me, maybe I'd put it towards a new sewing machine (I really want one with more "throat space" so I can quilt larger quilts on it).  

    Realistically, with that much, I'd probably feel bad having it all for me even if it really was all for me. So I'd likely use it on something we all could benefit from -- a membership somewhere, or something for the house/yard, or....I don't know. Right now my boys (all of them, DH included) are eyeing some VR thing......if I suddenly had $400 to spend, that's probably what I'd do right now. 

    Or, well, right this very now, we've got a LOT of unexpected expenses, so of course the smart thing would be "put it towards the bills" but.....ha. That's boring. 

    I have been considering a membership to the YMCA, just to get the kids more active (swimming!) during the winter. The problem is that I would then have to get four young kids and all their belongings over to the YMCA two towns over when I could just be in my nice warm house having a cup of tea!

     

    7 minutes ago, rebcoola said:

    It would depend right now we have no debt and and a good amount of savings. The kids are in activities if they weren't I would do that if it helped me.  So right now I would probably spend it on tattoos for me.  

     

    Oh...... I would love more ink!

    • Like 3

  9. Hypothetically, if you found $400 today (it is in your name, had been set aside 25 years ago and 'lost', definitely yours), what would you do with it?

    I was thinking about either helping DS24 buy a new used car or getting a membership somewhere for a few months for my younger boys to work off some energy. My BFF said to 'unfind' it immediately and invest it. DH would probably say to use it on bills. (Boo! No fun!) My mother said use it for something for myself. What say you?

    • Like 1

  10. I do insist that DS10 use cursive in all school assignments, except math. He still confuses the letters 'b' & 'd' in manuscript writing, but never in cursive. That said, his cursive is only slightly more legible than his printing, which is atrocious. He continues to get faster and more automatic in his cursive, so I'll continue to require for now.

    DS7 is a lefty, and continues to print all of his letters/numbers bottom-up and right-to-left, often writing entire words backwards. He just started cursive this September, and it is lovely and perfect and much, much faster for him. I haven't yet required that he use cursive in other subjects yet, but I will in 3rd grade.

    • Like 1

  11. On 2/1/2020 at 4:23 PM, Cake and Pi said:

    Our plans for next year are still solidifying, so I'll probably wait another month or so to share. 

    I'm curious, do you all still post on the regular grade level threads as well? Is there some point where a kid is just too accelerated to share outside of the AL board? 

    I've only started posting in the AL forum. I appreciate it when people with accelerated kids post in both places, because it shows that, even though they may be ahead in some areas, they may be on-level/behind-level in others. I don't know if it helps anyone else, but it is reassuring to me!

     

    DS10 (6th grade)

    Math: AoPS intro to algebra

    Logic: continue w/ Blast Off w/Logic series and misc. Mind Benders books.

    Science: Astronomy/Earth science (w/help from DH, an astronomy teacher)

    HistoryMedieval-Early Renaissance, using Kingfisher History Encyclopedia, The Story of Science, and Light to the Nations P1;  reading lists from Living Math U2

    Latin: finish Little Latin Readers & start Henle; also considering Portuguese Saturday school.

    Language arts: Spelling Workout F; Grammar for the Well Trained Mind (2nd time through); Writing With Skill level 1

    Literature: assigned books from the WTM reading list plus whatever else he wants to read, he usually has several non-school books going at once

    Sports: He plays sports fall, winter, and spring. We will put in place a daily workout routine of bodyweight exercises and cardio, maybe add in some readings and call it "health class".

    Misc.: He'll keep working through Code Combat for Python coding; typing program online; he's going to start some weekly cooking & baking lessons with me; we will learn some needlepoint skills together as a family (he's already a knitter). I need to find a way to fit piano and/or saxophone lessons into the budget (possibly online)

     

    DS7 (3rd grade)

     

    language arts:  First Language Lessons 3, Spelling Workout C, Zaner-Bloser 3 handwriting, copywork/narrations/dictations across the curriculum

    math & logic: Beast Academy 3, books from LivingMath U2, MindBenders/BalanceBenders/Math Analogies/etc.

    history: SOTW2 / read alouds from LivingMath U2

    literature: read-alouds from the WTM recommendations (to go along with SOTW2), plenty of read alouds, audiobooks 

    science: astronomy/earth science (WTM recommendations)

    Latin: start Little Latin Readers, possibly Saturday Portuguese school

    misc: This kid need plenty of unstructured time for following his own rabbit trails -- he pulls random nonfiction books off of DH's shelves and reads until he either doesn't understand anymore or gets bored; he's self-teaching Python, BBC Micro:Bit, and Raspberry Pi, etc. What he really needs is an organized physical activity, but his social anxiety won't let him join teams. Maybe piano lessons.

     

    DS5 (1st grade)

     

    phonics: finish Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading

    math and logic: Singapore Math 1A/B and MindBenders-type books 

    language arts: First Language Lessons 1, Writing With Ease 1, and Spelling Workout A, Zaner-Bloser 1

    science: (along with DS7 & DS10) earth science (library books) & astronomy (led by DH, an astronomy teacher)

    history: (along with DS7) medieval & early renaissance (SOTW2 & lots of library books)

    misc: he's playing soccer & maybe t-ball, weekly trips to the library, continue speech therapy weekly at the public school; maybe cub scouts; practical cleaning/cooking lessons; start CCD; possibly Saturday Portuguese school

    • Like 3

  12. Have you seen this thread? (The post linked here has the total list of all the resources discussed in the thread, but the thread itself is one of the two that I revisit most on this forum.)

    Other than that link, I'm probably not able to be of much help, since DS7 doesn't want to "do" math (work out problems, solve equations, etc), rather he wants to "think and talk" about math. He picks up random books from the library or his father's/DS10's bookshelves, reads them until he's found something interesting, and proceeds to ask a million questions and discuss the topic at hand until he's satisfied/bored/whatever, and then he starts the cycle over again. He read half of A Cartoon Guide to Calculus and then wanted to talk about limits, functions, and transcendental numbers for days. He read a Murderous Maths book and then explained to me how to add fractions with different denominators; once he showed me that he could do it, he was bored and moved on to something else. He picked up an intro to logic book and then proceeded to explain to me Wittgenstein's truth tables over breakfast. BUT, he hates to sit down and "do math". *insert rolling eyes emoji here*  Patty Paper Geometry is on my shortlist for his birthday this spring, along with some Zaccaro books that he's enjoyed from the library.

     


  13. 1 hour ago, Matryoshka said:

    If you're up here in Market Basket land, Market Basket has really good prices.  My mom is a bit south of where they have stores, and she'll drive up here to shop sometimes.  They used to have gross shrink-wrapped produce, but they've improved their stores a lot, and the produce has gotten much better. If you have that many Market Baskets near you, at least one of them's got to have been renovated.  I still get most of my produce frozen at TJ's or fresh at Whole Foods, because they have better organic selections, but if you're not worried about organic, they've got a lot.  I haven't been in a Stop & Shop for years, but I have heard many say they're much, much pricier than Market Basket.  Whole Foods is of course really pricey, but I do go in and shop the sales, and they also have some things I just can't get elsewhere.  If I can get something that is sold at both MB and WF, I buy it at MB.  If your Aldi is the one on 101a, that's the one I couldn't find a thing to buy in... 

    The reason that I don't regularly shop at MB is because I worked for 7+years in the perishable warehouse for Shaw's/Star Market. I saw *many* a trailer's worth of produce get rejected by the Shaw's inspectors where the driver was then told to drive over to the MB warehouse so they could take it. Granted, that was 15 years ago, but old biases are hard to shake. 

    Also, MB is always PACKED full of people, and I get overwhelmed in their stores fairly easily. Oldest DS works for them, and they are great for their employees... I just need to get over it and shop there.

    The Aldi near me is on MA/NH border. I'll check it out when I'm in the area tomorrow afternoon.


  14. 1 hour ago, Library Momma said:

    I do about 90% of my weekly shopping at Aldi and I probably save about $100 a trip versus other area grocery stores.  We have Stop and Shop, ShopRite, Price Chopper and local IGAs that I sometimes shop at as well.  We also have Trader Joe's and Whole Foods but I wouldn't ever consider doing an actual weekly  grocery shopping at those stores  - They are far too expensive.  I use them for specialty items.  Aldi's version of Fig Newtons are the best - Much better to me than the name brand and they are only .89 a package as opposed to around $3.00 a package for the name brand in other stores.  They also have seasonal  things that I would never treat myself to at other stores because they would be too expensive to just throw in the cart.  Things like Meyer Lemons, Snapdragon apples, etc.  I especially love the German treats around Octoberfest and Christmas.  

    I've been shopping almost exclusively at Stop & Shop for years. It's right up the street, it has nice wide aisles, and is usually fairly empty. I work the sales and use the app for coupons, buying in bulk to fill my extra freezer, and they have gas points that save me quite a bit at the station around the corner. I just learned that they are closing in a few weeks! 😭 The thought of having to learn to shop somewhere else is anxiety-inducing. We have, within a 15 minute drive, six (?) Market Baskets, an Aldi, a Whole Foods, two BJs, and two other (one smaller, one larger) Stop & Shops. I've never been inside Aldi, so maybe it's time to check it out...


  15. That article says they the vaccine is a good match for H1N1, which nearly killed my DS24 in 2009 ( hello, swine flu!). My kids all get their shots in October every year, as soon as the vaccine is available.

    I was supposed to get my shot at my yearly checkup but that appt has been changed multiple times and I still haven't done it. I was pretty sick last week and may have had a mild flu, based on my symptoms. I'm going to CVS tonight when DH gets home to get my shot. I definitely had the flu four years ago, and it was awful.

    • Like 1

  16. 1 hour ago, happi duck said:

    There's a cookbook your library might have called Cheap, Fast, Good.  The recipes might not be specifically helpful but it has a lot of cutting costs ideas.  

    That reminded me of the book "Eat Well on $4 a Day: Good and Cheap" (free PDF download). It's about sticking to the food stamp budget of $4/day per person. She has recipes, but also lots of good ideas on keeping a stocked pantry on a budget and other things. I reread it every once in a while, when I get into a grocery rut. 

    • Like 1

  17. phonics: continue Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading

    math and logic: Singapore Math 1A/B and MindBenders-type books

    handwriting: Zaner-Bloser 1

    language arts: First Language Lessons 1, Writing With Ease 1, and Spelling Workout A

    science: (along with DS7 & DS10) earth science (library books) & astronomy (led by DH, an astronomy teacher)

    history: (along with DS7) medieval & early renaissance (SOTW2 & lots of library books)

    foreign language: I'm considering Portuguese Saturday school for DSs 5, 7, &10

    misc: he's playing soccer & t-ball, weekly trips to the library, continue speech therapy weekly at the public school, maybe cub scouts 

     

     

    • Like 3

  18. Math: AoPS intro to algebra

    Logic: continue w/ Blast Off w/Logic series and misc. Mind Benders books.

    Science: Astronomy/Earth science (w/help from DH, an astronomy teacher)

    HistoryMedieval-Early Renaissance, using Kingfisher History Encyclopedia, The Story of Science, and Light to the Nations P1;  reading lists from Living Math U2

    Foreign Language: Little Latin Readers, level 4, then start Henle; also considering Portuguese Saturday school.

    Language arts: Spelling Workout F; Grammar for the Well Trained Mind, red book; Writing With Ease SKILL level 1

    Cursive: Zaner-Bloser 6, unless he makes great strides over the rest of this year.

    Literature: assigned books from the WTM reading list plus whatever else he wants to read, he usually has several non-school books going at once

    Sports: He plays sports fall, winter, and spring. We will put in place a daily workout routine of bodyweight exercises and cardio, maybe add in some readings and call it "health class".

    Misc.: He'll keep working through Code Combat for Python coding; typing program online; he's going to start some weekly cooking & baking lessons with me; we will learn some needlepoint skills together as a family

    Music: This one is up in the air - I need to find a way to fit piano and/or saxophone lessons into the budget.

    • Like 1

  19. 2 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

    2. being realistic. I heard someone say $100 per month per person...and that was so so so far off of where we are....but that same person I think says they eat out twice a week. 

    I don't believe that is realistic for most people. I feed a household of seven people and I spend nearly twice this. That doesn't take into account takeout pizza every Friday night and happy meals for 4 kids once per week. It is 'possible' to do it that cheaply, but that requires a significant amount of work (planning, prepping, coupons, multiple stores, whatever) that I don't have the time or the mental bandwidth to be able to do. 

    I have a small chest freezer in the garage and I buy multiples of things my family likes when they are on sale (meat, fish, fish sticks, vegetables, fruit, ice cream, etc) plus flour and other baking supplies at the holidays. I make an inventory of everything in the fridge/freezer/pantry once a month and post it on my cabinet so I know what I have and what I can make this week. I have a bin in each place that holds the oldest stuff, marked EAT ME, to help cut down on food waste. 

    I know it's probably not helpful, but my DH and I just had this discussion about our rampaging grocery budget recently and we stepped back to look at it in relation to our other discretionary spending. Factoring in the mental effort and time costs that would be required for me to cut the grocery budget a few hundred dollars, it would be significantly easier for us to cut that elsewhere. We've reevaluated our cellphone and wifi plans, or streaming services (hellooooo!$$$), our mindless ordering off of Amazon, etc... We decided that we will keep an eye on the food budget but, for now, it is what it is. 

×
×
  • Create New...