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VegasMommy

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  1. Language: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Lessons supplemented with easy books from the Library (in progress) Some Engage NY worksheets (in progress: it's used by public school teachers and it's free, it has a lot of great pre-writing worksheets so far) Prescripts (Yellow book, 1/2 coloring book 1/2 cursive practice, we find that cursive is easier to learn than the block or manuscript letters--haven't actually started the book yet) Writing Journal (it's 1/2 blank for a picture and has 5 lines to write on, used to note what a story is about, practice writing, spelling/vocab etc...I stole the idea from my husband who teaches AP Language to High School Seniors) Math: (not started) Math for a Living Education (free) Supplemented with Miquon Math and maybe Singapore Math Music/Art: (not started) Art for a Living Education (free) it also hits the Geometry that isn't covered by the MfaLE book Faber Primer books for Piano (in progress) Tin Whistle (see below) Science: Mudpies to Magnets experiments and see below. We are doing Classical Conversations this year so I plan to supplement the science and history facts with age appropriate books from the library and trips to museums. We already started "playing" with the Tin whistle and my son can play a somewhat descent scale. We are a musical family. We have an awesome field trip coordinator who is planning field trips to match up with science or history throughout the year too. It seems like a lot, but I am a somewhat unconventional homeschooler and believe that most learning happens through experience and play at this age not worksheets/busywork.
  2. I'm planning to do MLFLE with my Kindergartener this year. The first few lessons will be a lot of review. I did notice it does very simple geometry so I plan to supplement that (2&3d objects) and there's no comparisons (greater than/less than). They did have some extras like fractions. I used the state standards to review the book to decide whether it was comprehensive enough. Overall I think it's fine for Kindergarten if you supplement with comparisons and geometry. Crabby since 8-13-14 Es Bullseye, Buzz and Bo Peep PPs Rex, Woody, Jessie and Mick (Bo Peep and Rex coming March)
  3. I'm planning to do MLFLE with my Kindergartener this year. The first few lessons will be a lot of review. I did notice it does very simple geometry so I plan to supplement that (2&3d objects) and there's no comparisons (greater than/less than). They did have some extras like fractions. I used the state standards to review the book to decide whether it was comprehensive enough. Overall I think it's fine for Kindergarten if you supplement with comparisons and geometry. Crabby since 8-13-14 Es Bullseye, Buzz and Bo Peep PPs Rex, Woody, Jessie and Mick (Bo Peep and Rex coming March)
  4. I like wordpress EXCEPT for private (like login to view content) blogs you have to invite people and are limited on how many people you can invite. Crabby since 8-13-14 Es Bullseye, Buzz and Bo Peep PPs Rex, Woody, Jessie and Mick (Bo Peep and Rex coming March)
  5. THIS ADVERT HAS EXPIRED!

    • Wanted
    • USED

    I'd like to buy the Teacher's Manual and DVD for Math U See Alpha. Would like the current edition. I'd prefer to pay less than $20.

    $20.00

  6. I really like the Math Curriculum that Angela O'Dell put up for young learners at mathlessonsforalivingeducation.com (and it's free to print). I was wondering whether anyone had any experience with her history books. I am wondering whether Story of the Ancients: A Living History of Our World would be appropriate for a young learner. This year we are studying Ancient History (in conjunction with Classical Conversations). I know that CC recommends The Story of the World, but when I previewed it I wasn't too impressed. My son is turning 5 this year and this is our first year in CC and with some structured curriculum. He is already starting to read, and has a large vocabulary (including 3 and 4 syllable words--Daddy is an AP English teacher).
  7. I have a K aged son starting with CC in the fall. The cost is rather steep, but it's LESS than any of the curriculums in a box that I've looked at. You could also consider tutoring at CC to offset the cost. (If it's not too late to do the training.) Also, after you get over the sticker shock of how much the CC community group costs, you only really need the $75 lesson manual and the $11 tin whistle. Google will fill in the blanks about a lot of the stuff that they are memorizing (like what each of the timeline pieces are, the history and science stuff etc.) The library is invaluable as a resource. You might also check Craigslist nearby to see what people are getting rid of. Used Curriculum Fairs are great places to pick up cheap curriculum. At the recommendation of a friend, I am using Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. $25 on Amazon and usually available at the library. I'm thinking about using this for math. http://www.mathlessonsforalivingeducation.com/and it's FREE if you print it yourself. There are also science and art lessons. EngageNY.org has a bunch of free Math and Language Arts curriculum. It's created for NY educators to comply with Common Core. (So the Common Core thing spooks people, but I think it's "dumber" than most homeschool curriculums for the equivalent grade levels, just a thought. Also, from what you said, your daughter is already meeting standards that she has until the END of K to complete.) Since they are in Kindergarten (soon) I'd think that less is more and letting them explore the world and learn organically is more important than trying to force too much content too soon.
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