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Reverie

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About Reverie

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    Hive Mind Worker Bee
  1. My son will be turning five this winter, so this will be a prekindergarten/ transitional kindergarten year. We will be using Wee Folk Art's Simple Seasons units for themed science, nature studies, crafts, art, and activities. I will be creating our own 'letter of the week' activities based on his interests. I may use MEP Reception for math, otherwise, math will be continuing to follow his interests in our daily activities (addition/ subtraction/ measuring/ counting, etc.). He will also be included as much as he wishes in my third-grade daughter's activities. She will be using Wee Folk Art's Cultural Connections units, Oak Meadow Third Grade, RightStart Math D, Building Foundations of Scientific Understanding, and other resources. Editing to add that he loves science experiments, so we will be doing lots of those as well. ?
  2. My 5 year old just used it for K. We breezed along for the first one hundred or so pages, and then my daughter started to get less interested in reading such a long block of words. I tried a few games in an attempt to present the words in a different manner. It's not that she is challenged beyond her ability- she actually can read beyond where we're at in PP- but the pages often have long lists of words that just aren't that engaging. We're continuing on, but not at the 'page a day' I'd planned.
  3. I purchased used editions for Prek- 1st grade for a few dollars each. I think they're nice as a guide to see what 'should' be covered if you want to see if you're hitting the marks, and a nice collection of age-appropriate stories, sayings, and poems. I'm sure the information could be found elsewhere online, though. The Core Knowledge Sequence book gives an overview of K-8, with sections for different subjects per grade, poetry/fable/saying recommendations, etc. but does not include the actual stories. It's sort of like the 'What Your Nth Grader Needs To Know" in a K-8 outline version. https://www.amazon.com/Core-knowledge-sequence-Content-guidelines/dp/1890517208/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467939215&sr=8-1&keywords=core+knowledge+sequence
  4. I'm not in Australia, but both of my children like this one. The pictures are very detailed. I'm not too crazy about the kidnapped koala imagery, though. Too violent. We also own the Dr. Suess one. It's a fun read. Animal Alphabet by Brian Wildsmith is lovely.
  5. @Janeway- We're you contemplating OM's PreK for your daughter, or kindergarten for the future? I just wanted to share that the Oak Meadow PreK does not include lessons or schedules of any sort. There's a craft kit, and books for you about Oak Meadow's philosophy on early childhood and academics, as well as a book on what to focus on with preschoolers- storytelling, block play, etc. @TKDMom- We're finishing up OM kindergarten, and really enjoyed it. I loved the creative, story- and craft-filled approach, but was hesitant because my daughter already knew what was covered academically. I did add to meet her where she's at, but there was a lot more to engage her in OMK than I'd thought at first glance. We plan on continuing on with OM1. It sounds like OM would be a good match for your family- I'm finding it flexible enough to use as a stand-alone or modify to meet your needs. I haven't hit the higher grades yet, but I've heard from many that third and up are fairly writing intensive. If you want something detailed down to the day, you might feel like you need to do more work, but the weekly lesson plans worked great for my family- lots of flexibility. less fear of falling behind if you make changes.
  6. I only have experience with RightStart Math A (first edition). It works really well for my K daughter- math is now her favorite subject.
  7. I agree with the hotel, for safety reasons. I'd be worried about the chance of a pedophile pulling a child into their room to assault them. It was my first thought, most likely because a child predator in my state will be living in undisclosed hotels because there is so much controversy regarding which neighborhood to release him to.
  8. Thank you for your replies, I really appreciate your help. :) To be clear, Phonics Pathways seems to be working well, so I don't plan on switching curricula- I was contemplating just trying something else for awhile, like reading games. I think I'll take your advice and just continue on at her pace, and add in games for extra practice when needed. 4bleesingmom, thank you for the suggestion of Happy Phonics- I'll take a closer look. :) I have the book Games For Reading by Peggy Kaye, I think we'll explore a few of its games with our current concepts.
  9. Hello everyone, My daughter is 5.5 years and about eighty odd pages into Phonics Pathways. We do a page a day most days, and she enjoys it. She writes notes and signs every day for fun, and loves to read to her little brother. We're currently on consonant diagraphs ch/tch, and she's doing okay, but not as fluent as the prior material. For example, she'll through an 'n' sound when there isn't one if the prior, similar word had it. I am new to this, and wondering how you would approach it. I'm not certain as to when Phonics Pathways concepts would be more appropriate for a first grader vs. a kindergartener (I know all children are different), or if I should keep moving forward slower with more review, or stop and try other things for awhile- depth not breadth. Thank you for your help. :)
  10. I deliberated between FIAR and Wee Folk Art's Simple Seasons, and decided on WFA SS. Wee Folk Art's Simple Seasons curriculum is geared for PreK-K (ages 4-6), and is seasonally-themed units with storybooks, science books, crafts, recipes, poetry, and art studies. It sounds like you already have the basics covered, but if not, they do give suggestions for phonics and math for a complete K curriculum. I used their summer unit (Puddles & Ponds) before starting K to get into the groove of things, and my daughter loved it. We're now working our way through the other units. The original units are free, and there are also updated printed guides available. Depending on your library, you could probably borrow most or all of the books instead of buying them. Link to the units here: https://weefolkart.com/homeschool-companion-guides/ I also admin their homeschooling group on FB, and we would love to have you if you're interested in using the units or learning more. :) Other ideas, based on what my daughter has loved so far: science experiment kit, we have this one: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0035EQDTU?keywords=learning%20resources%20science%20kit&qid=1456983081&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1 Snap Circuits Jr.: http://www.amazon.com/Snap-Circuits-SC-100-Electronics-Discovery/dp/B00008BFZH/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1456983177&sr=8-1&keywords=snap+circuits Magformers: http://www.amazon.com/Magformers-63069-14-Piece-Set/dp/B000II0T5K/ref=sr_1_4?s=toys-and-games&ie=UTF8&qid=1456983233&sr=1-4&keywords=magformers lots and lots of fairytales, folk tales, storybooks, and music dance classes field trips to farms, zoos, museums, parks, etc.
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