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Shelly in VA

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Everything posted by Shelly in VA

  1. Statistics is a good suggestion. I was surprised that the only math class my nursing major dd had to take in college was statistics, while my math major ds never had to take a statistics class. I actually think it would be worthwhile for everyone to have some exposure to it, because, as several people have mentioned, it can be both interesting and practical.
  2. I agree on the Spielvogel - I used it a few years ago with another of my kids, and liked only parts of it. Thank you for pointing out The Great Courses Daily - I had no idea that was out there! I spent way too much time today looking at various articles there. 🙃
  3. Thank you for the link to that website! I am constantly telling my kids that if they have tried to work a problem, working backwards from the solution is a perfectly fine approach. I've always thought that is part of the reason some of the solutions are included in student textbooks!
  4. Can I ask if the TE was helpful beyond the schedule? I'm guessing I would need it if I go with a textbook instead of an online program. Although I have a math minor from college, it has been MANY years since I tackled math (beyond helping kids with problems here and there). Not sure how I managed to do so little math with my older kids throughout their high school years, lol.
  5. Thank you! Going to grab my book and look at it compared to the page you sent to see if this could work. I appreciate it! I will PM you after I get a chance to look it over.
  6. That sounds like a good approach. Ds has expressed an interest in economics, psychology, and philosophy, and this past year he watched Crash Course videos as an intro to both economics and philosophy. I had my older kids do a semester of economics in addition to history, but I had not considered covering those social sciences for all of their junior and senior years. Maybe because the others were less interested in those topics. But this might work well for this particular kid. Thank you!
  7. These are great ideas, thank you! I am not familiar with the "How to Lose at..." series, but I think ds would be very interested in something like that. I'll search for those.
  8. I was considering Guest Hollow for geography! That looks interesting to me. I like the way they integrate interesting reading into their curriculum.
  9. How did you tackle these subjects? Did you have some sort of spine that you used as a guide? With one of my older kids, we tried to pull our own course together to cover European History in high school, but it wasn't a great experience. I want to be more of an academic unschooler than I am, haha, but I'm not very good at it! 😉
  10. I forgot about Thinkwell! Thanks. I've used Thinkwell Chemistry in the past, and ds will actually be doing that this fall. That might be a great fit for him.
  11. You are describing my son here! 😉 I have always heard good things about Foerster, but I've never used it (or even seen it, actually). Thanks!
  12. Thanks! I have not looked at Derek Owens or the Larson book, but I'll check them out. I don't have the TE for the Dolciani, but I can see where it could be scaled back the way you are suggesting.
  13. Has anyone covered history at the high school level without following the 4-year cycle? I followed that with my older kids who have all graduated and gone on to college, but I'm looking to try something different this last time around with my youngest ds who will be a sophomore this fall. I considered a full year of geography last year, but ended up doing a year of ancient history. For his sophomore and junior years, we could still do a full year of geography and perhaps a year of world history, then his senior year could be topical choices. I'm not sure why I'm looking to make this change; it's probably burnout on my part! But I remember taking focused classes (a Civil War class that lasted one semester stands out strongly in my memory) my junior/senior year of high school and finding them engaging. Does anyone have curriculum to suggest that could cover either geography at the high school level or specific topics in enough depth for a high school credit? Thank you!
  14. I realize those options are vastly different! I used the Dolciani Algebra 2 and Trig book and used it with one of my older kids. But I'm not sure that it's the right choice for ds. He is a solid math student, but he does not like math, and he gets easily frustrated. I also previously used VideoText, but I hesitate to use that now since ds did not use if for Algebra 1. Because of that, I am considering something like CTC or Teaching Textbooks, but I am hesitant to use something that is computer based. Based on older reviews, I am also concerned that CTC is better as a supplement rather than a full curriculum, but maybe that has changed. Also, if I go with CTC, would I need to do their Algebra 2 course followed by Trig and PreCalculus before getting to Calculus? Could those three classes cover two years of math without too much overlap, leaving his senior year open for Calculus? Any input would be appreciated! Thank you!
  15. Thank you, @Lori D.! That is a fabulous list! And, yes, the age range is a bit challenging. 😉 We started off as two separate age groups, but merged last year and now this is where we are. 🤷‍♀️ We read Long Walk to Water last year - it was one of our favorites! Great story and great discussion. But we haven't read any of the others as a group. I really love the group and the chance to watch the kids interact with the books and each other! Thank you so much for the list of titles!
  16. I facilitate a monthly book club for kids aged ~10-14, and this year I'm trying to follow a geography theme. I want to pick engaging, discussable titles that also give a sense of the region (no particular time period). So far, we've read Angel on the Square by Gloria Whelan (Eastern Europe/Russia) and The Shakespeare Stealer by Gary Blackwood (Western Europe/England). But now I'm stuck. 😉 I am struggling to choose titles for Africa and Asia in particular (maybe because these regions encompass so many different cultures!). I'm roughly using the regions from Give Your Child the World by Jamie C. Martin, but those titles are on the younger side of the age range I'm targeting. Any titles or authors anyone can suggest? I appreciate it! Thank you!
  17. I facilitate a monthly book club for kids aged ~10-14, and this year I'm trying to follow a geography theme. I want to pick engaging, discussable titles that also give a sense of the region (no particular time period). So far, we've read Angel on the Square by Gloria Whelan (Eastern Europe/Russia) and The Shakespeare Stealer by Gary Blackwood (Western Europe/England). But now I'm stuck. 😉 I am struggling to choose titles for Africa and Asia in particular (maybe because these regions encompass so many different cultures!). I'm roughly using the regions from Give Your Child the World by Jamie C. Martin, but those titles are on the younger side of the age range I'm targeting. Any titles or authors anyone can suggest? I appreciate it! Thank you!
  18. Bumping to see if anyone has used this. I've looked at it, too, but I'd like input before deciding. Thanks!
  19. Dd moved in this past weekend. She will be an RA this year, so it is only student staff on campus at this point. Most of their staff training this week is online, so she spent 6 hours in Zoom training yesterday in her room by herself. 🙄 But she and the others in her section of housing walked together to pick up their grab-and-go dinner. The majority of move-in starts Saturday, staggered over a week, with everyone assigned a 2 hour window and only 1 person allowed on campus to help the student with move in. Classes start 8/24. All but one of dd's classes has been moved online over the course of the summer, and the only one that will still be in person is actually only having one day a week in person with the other days online. Really there are hardly any classes meeting in person at this point, even though on paper it appears that the university is hybrid for the fall. Also, at this point, everything will be online after Thanksgiving, BUT students are allowed to stay on campus until Christmas break starts. Which makes no sense to me! Even in this new era when so little makes sense, this decision tops the confusing list for me! 🤣
  20. Yes! My daughter read some of the titles from the GH biology class just for fun just because she had enjoyed the physics titles. The scope of the GH biology class is excellent!
  21. Thanks for the feedback. I was very structured with my older kids when it came to their high school history, but I thought it could be more self-directed for kid #3 who loved history. I had an overall plan, but the lack of cohesion bothered her as much as it did me. Maybe it was really her, and I'm projecting that on to myself! 🤷‍♀️ She actually started college as a history major, but has since changed to English. I'm going to have to think on that! As far as what DS likes, he liked Mystery of History through middle school, but he doesn't want to use the same text books for high school. I can respect that. What do we own? More than we should; haha. Although most of what we have on hand is more elementary/middle school level, as we relied heavily on library books through high school when we could. Curriculum wise, we have Tapestry of Grace, Mystery of History, and some History Odyssey. Maybe my actual problem is a bit of burnout. I've been online this morning looking at MFW, Sonlight, Beautiful Feet, and Heart of Dakota. I'm feeling restless! Thank you for the input. Off to think some more.
  22. I have used DIVE biology with 3 kids so far and will be using it again this year with my 4th. It is one of the few things I have used for every child! It is a very solid program, and it does a nice job of covering the material as well as providing labs and quizzes and tests. We have used it primarily with the BJU biology text, but we have also used Miller Levine for a few of the topics. For the kids I have used it with, one later took Anatomy & Physiology and went on to get a nursing degree (BSN), one went on to get a BS in math, and one is currently in college in a humanities field. It honestly was a good fit for all of them for different reasons, and they each felt that they were well prepared for whatever came next for them academically. I would highly recommend the program!
  23. I would look at something else. I tried to supplement GH Physics for my daughter in her senior year of high school. She is now entering her sophomore year of college as an English major, and while she enjoys science, she is/was not a math/science oriented kid. I have an engineering degree, so I felt that I had the background to try to supplement. However, it didn't work for us. We ended up switching to a calculus based physics book ~6 weeks into the year. She still read and enjoyed some of the GH books (the titles were what drew me to the program initially). But if I were to do it again, I would start with a more rigorous program and add GH resources as extras.
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