Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

ElizabethB

Members
  • Content Count

    10,846
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by ElizabethB

  1. Well, it's not a full syllabary, it's a row of syllables, then some words based on those syllables. But, it's free and you could make your own syllabary from it! There used to be French syllabaries, someone who speaks more French than I do might be able to find one on Google books. I found it on the website Lire-ecrire, which seems to be an advocate for syllabic phonics and non-fuzzy math. (My French is poor to non-existant.) Here is the link on Lire-ecrire explaining it: http://www.lire-ecrire.org/conseils-pratiques/manuels-scolaires/methodes-de-lectures-et-decriture.html'>http://www.lire-ecrire.org/conseils-pratiques/manuels-scolaires/methodes-de-lectures-et-decriture.html And, here is the website where you can get a free pdf versions of the books if you click something! (They then send you e-mails in French once a month. They only one I understood was when they said that they now carried Singapore Math in French.) http://www.lalibrairiedesecoles.com/librairie/lecture,1 The Lire-ecrire website also lists some other French phonics suggestions: http://www.lire-ecrire.org/conseils-pratiques/manuels-scolaires/methodes-de-lectures-et-decriture.html (Again, take my French translations with a large grain of salt! :lol::lol::lol:)
  2. I have most of the rules on my how to tutor page, links #5 and #6 at the end of the page. The ones I don't have are the suffix rules, I didn't write them out because there are so many and they are not needed for a beginning student. The are all in my phonics lesson #22. You can also see some good lists of rules here in this thread, the David Appleyard one has the best suffix rules. http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=77560 I've found nonsense words to be very helpful for fixing the guessing problem, use my phonics concentration game for a fun way to get in some nonsense words. You'd be surprised--I do have students who try to guess from word lists! But, up until 2 years ago, I didn't have a single student who tried to guess at lists of nonsense words. (I have some nonsense word lists for my tough remedial cases.) He had such a bad guessing habit that he couldn't help himself, even though he was good at math and appreciated the statistical probability of guessing a nonsense word!! We had to make him sound out every sound of every single word before he was allowed to say a word. After a few weeks of this, he was much better. Are you teaching French, too? If or when you do, there is a free French syllabic phonics book available, it's nice to compare syllables across languages. I taught my daughter Spanish with syllables. Spanish lends itself nicely to syllables.
  3. Yes, you can just follow my lessons. I am basically working through the 1824 Speller from Don Potter's page, but when my son has trouble with something, we go back and review that section, so some things are out of order. I go at the student's pace--my daughter actually went much faster! But, I would go even slower if need be, you keep working on things until they get it and then move on. You can also use syllables combined with Blend Phonics, my how to tutor page shows how to add in syllables to Blend Phonics, the #4 link at the end. Either is fine, whatever is less confusing for you. As long as you are working on things from L to R and eventually get some syllable work in, you are good! I do think it is a bit better to start with the syllables, though. Yes, with an older child I would do 2 short sessions a day. The second can be 5 minutes of instruction and then games. At some point next year I may have to start doing that with my son. We actually did 3 more weeks worth of work that I didn't add to the thread--we took a week off end then had to spend a few weeks reviewing!! Then, we just did phonics games for his last week of school. We had 3 weeks off for summer after that, last week we had our first day of light summer school, I'm doing 2X a week phonics for him and 2X a week math for my daughter. He was a bit rusty but not as bad off as I feared.
  4. It depends on the age. I always give the rules anyway, I can't help myself, but for 5 and 6 year olds, they tend to learn more by pattern than by rule. For older students, the rules are very helpful. There are not that many rules in the speller, although the old dictionaries were filled with rules. I have some rules on my how to tutor page and also explanations into how to add syllables and spelling rules to Blend Phonics, and how to explicitly explain syllables. The explicit instructions are in #4, the Blend Phonics guide. But, yes, with my son, I just give a brief explanation why and then have him read and spell some words that follow that pattern/rule. With my older remedial students, I have longer explanations and spend more time on the rules. I also do a bit more spelling with my older students. (And, I do more spelling with my son than I did with my daughter because he can handle more spelling than she could. I also read more words per day with my daughter because she could handle more reading than he could at that age.) You're welcome!
  5. We got to 2-syllable words this week! He spells them better than he can read them. My daughter couldn't spell more than one or two per day at that age, he can spell almost as many as he can read and has an easier time spelling them than reading them. However, she could read more of them than he can, she could read 20 at a time. (Co-op ended, so we are now on a 5 day week.) Week 28. D1. FLAME, FLAMES; FRAME, FRAMES; STAND, STANDS; DROVE, DROVES; ROBE, ROBES; FLAG, FLAGS; MARE, MARES; TARE, TARES; GRATE, GRATES; SMITE, SMITES; BRICK, BRICKS D2. ACK ECK ICK OCK UCK; ASH ESH ISH OSH USH SHA SHE SHI SHO SHU SHY; CHA CHE CHI CHO CHU CHY KICK, KICKS; STICK, STICKS; BRIDLE, BRIDLES; FIRE, FIRES; SWIM, SWIMS BA-KER, BRI-ER, CI-DER, CRA-ZY, CRI-ER, CRU-EL D3. Spelled PILOT, SPIDER, PAPER, HUMAN D4. Read DA-AL, DI-ET, DU-TY, DRA-PER, FA-TAL, FE-VER, FI-NAL, FLA-GRANT, FLU-ENT, FO-CUS, FRU-GAL (Skipped DY-ER because it is archaic.) D5. iPod app "abc Pocket Phonics" for a fun break after all those 2-syllable words
  6. Yesterday we finally got to 2 syllable words! Here are the last two weeks. He is coming along. Week 26. D1. AD ED ID OD UD; DA DE DI DO DU DY; BLACK CRACK MATCH PATCH FETCH VETCH; MIRE SPINE VINE GRIPE SNIPE STRIPE; SIRE QUIRE SPIRE MIRE SMITE SPITE D2. STRIFE FIFE TRITE QUITE SQUIRE SPIKE BRIDE CHIDE GLIDE PRIDE VICE TRICE BRICK KICK CHICK CLICK LICK STICK STRIVE SPIKE SPLICE STRIKE RIDE WIDE D3. NAME, NAMES; DAME, DAMES; GALE, GALES; SCALE, SCALES; CAPE, CAPES; CAMP, CAMPS; CLAMP, CLAMPS; LAMP, LAMPS; SCALP, SCALPS; MAP, MAPS; SLAVE, SLAVES; BRAVE, BRAVES D4. STAVE, STAVES; MATE, MATES; STATE, STATES; GRAPE, GRAPES; CRANE, CRANES; SHADE, SHADES; GRADE, GRADES; PLANT, PLANTS; PLANK, PLANKS; FLAG, FLAGS; BANK, BANKS Week 27 D1. SNARE, SNARES; SNAKE, SNAKES; CAKE, CAKES; FLAKE, FLAKES; HOPE, HOPES; NOTE, NOTES; CHAP, CHAPS; FLANK, FLANKS; SHINE, SHINES; SLOPE, SLOPES; FOLD, FOLDS D2. MIND, MINDS; BIND, BINDS; CUBE, CUBES; BLOT, BLOTS; GRAVE, GRAVES; STREET, STREETS; SHEET, SHEETS; CLUB, CLUBS; VOTE, VOTES; CONE, CONES; BONE, BONES D3. SHAKE, SHAKES; PIPE, PIPES; WIRE, WIRES; HIVE, HIVES; PINE, PINES; FADE, FADES; MILL, MILLS; HILL, HILLS; SIDE, SIDES; VALE, VALES; ADD, ADDS D4. WIFE, WIVES; LIFE, LIVES; HIVE, HIVES; DRIVE, DRIVES; GO, GOES; WO, WOES; DO, DOES; BLANK, BLANKS; CHOKE, CHOKES; CLOKE, CLOKES; SMOKE, SMOKES (Explained that DOES is an exception. Also, told him that "f and v are cousins." Had him say both sounds to compare, told him that F sometimes changes to V when the word is plural.)
  7. They are just divided to help you figure out if the vowel is short or long, so it will be divided up let-ters. The students figure out the word fine. In one of his books, Webster talks about this and explains his decision to go for ease of learning to read over exact pronunciation. (It's not one I own, Don Potter sent the quote to me, I would have to scour hundreds of e-mails to find it.) You do the th row twice, once with each sound of th.
  8. My daughter did about twice as many words per day as my son, she completed the Speller in a few months less than a school year. My son will probably take 1 1/2 school years on the pace he is at now, he has speeded up the last few weeks. At the pace he was at earlier, it would take 2 years.
  9. Well, I got a copy and was disappointed. I would not waste your money. The scanned document on Google books is a higher quality scan than the reprint you linked. It is good enough to read for an adult, but not a young child. I would just print out the online one if you are going to use Dilworth and want a hard copy. (Although personally, I would just write them out on a whiteboard from the computer, you will only be teaching a few syllables and words every day.) There should be some more recent British Spellers, though, I'll ask around and see what I can find. Some of the words in Dilworth are pretty archaic, even for me, and I like old words.
  10. You should not. You will defeat most of the purpose of the syllabary if you do, actually. If you look at the later tables, the words are divided up with syllables, and those ending in a vowel are long, and those ending in a consonant are short, here are some example words: ba-ker, ho-ly, ad-mit, in-sect, ta-per, ban-ter, de-fine, re-li-ance After over-learning that syllables ending in a vowel are long, they can easily sound out words like ba-ker, ho-ly, de-fine, and re-li-ance. Teaching ba as short would add confusion and defeats the whole design of the Speller. Yes, they should be able to read and spell all the syllables except ca ce ci co cu cy, sca sce sci sco scu scy, ga ge gi go gu gy, before you move on. You can work on these remaining syllables with a mix of hard and soft g and c while moving on to the rest of the Speller. Just remember that it is the key to the whole speller. Later, if they have trouble with syllable, refer back the the syllabary. For example, in the word di-plo-ma (which is accented on the 2nd syllable, plo, so will schwa on the syllables di and ma), if they mispronounce plo, saying short o instead, go back to the syllabary and have them read "pla ple pli plo plu ply," then point at plo in the syllabary and have them read it again, then plo in the word, then have them try to read the whole word again.
  11. Week 25 My son is starting to get it, we are moving along a bit faster now!! D1. Reminded him that g has a j sound before e, i, and y and c like s before e, i and y. After g syllables, told him that ai together says long a. Before his and has, I did is and as and reminded him that s sometimes has a z sound, and it did in these words. I also told him that L's were often doubled in short words. GA GE GI GO GU GY; CA CE CI CO CU CY; AGE AIM AID ICE ALE ACE APE HIS HAS HAST HATH ADD ELF PEN RICH HELD GIFT DULL TILL WILL WELL. D2. ASH ESH ISH OSH USH; LESS MESS KISS MISS; HUSH DESK DISK DESK; DUKE RULE TIME; TUNE MUTE MAZE ROBE D3. SHA SHE SHI SHO SHU SHY; LIFE WIFE SAFE MALE SAVE; GLADE GRADE SHAVE WAVE; QUAKE STAGE SNAKE GLAZE; CRAZE PLAT4 SLATE SHAPE; HERE (I thought he might have trouble with here, but he figured it out easily.) D4. Right before the ng words, I explained the ng sound of n in ng and nk. CHA CHE CHI CHO CHU CHY; THA THE THI THO THU THY (we did twice with both sounds of th.) TRACK PACK PLANT; SANG FANG SANG; CLANK CRANK SHANK PLANK; CLUMP THUMP CLAMP CHAMP; SPASM SPLASH CRASH
  12. It is probably OK if you do a bit of spelling, but if you work on too much reading before they are ready to blend, they will start to memorize things by sight, not sounding them out. Sight syllables are probably better than sight words, but I'm not a fan of sight anything, I've seen too much guessing and difficulty with phonics from sight words. :party: That's great! I've found that Webster's Speller is especially helpful for my students with speech difficulties. They also are generally helped by a marked print, you may need to use the 1908 version eventually. Also, for blends, my students with speech difficulties do better with them if they do the syllables first (once they can make the blend), then words with the blend. For example, bla ble bli blo blu bly bland black blend...
  13. OK, I'll translate for Webster! The beauty of the arrangement by accent pattern is that you start to get a feeling for the schwa/accent pattern of long words. This is especially helpful for a young child who has not heard a lot of long words, and for ESL students, most English language training does not work much with how words in English are accented and how they schwa. In Don Potter's reproduced Webster's Speller, the accented syllables are bold. I like that better than accent marks, it is easier to see and understand the accent that way. Unaccented syllables often schwa. The letters a and o are most likely to schwa, and they usually schwa to the short u sound. They are especially likely to schwa on a final syllable that is unaccented. The letter a also will usually schwa when it is the first letter and unaccented, as in awake and again. The letter e will sometimes schwa to short u but often will "schwi" to short i when unaccented. This is because if you relax your mouth from where it is when saying an e, the natural sound that comes out is a short i. When you try to say a long word in English fast, you relax your mouth on unaccented syllables to get it out quicker, resulting in many vowels that will "schwa" or "schwi." The dictionary will show these as an upside down e.
  14. :lol::lol::lol: Well, I am heading to bed, too. If you cannot figure it out in the morning, I will translate the archaic English into modern English for you.
  15. I'm glad it's working! For the first few months, we reviewed syllables daily. Now, I review them occasionally. He is having a bit of trouble with SH and CH, so I did the SH syllables before a group of words with SH. Next time a CH comes up, I will do the CH syllables. I also often do the C syllables before words with soft C, and the G syllables before words with soft G. Webster explains that eventually, when he gets to multi-syllable words. Right after table 4, he explains: Right after table 5, he states:
  16. Interesting! I did not know Dilworth had a following!! I will add it to my cart, and buy it when I find another book to get to free shipping. I will let you know how it looks. It sounds promising, though.
  17. Well, it is probably hundreds of dollars at least for a working copy, it is from 1820. The cheapest you can get a book in fair condition right now is for $85. There are more recent British Spellers that would be cheaper if you really want an actual book. For K and 1st grade, I prefer to teach from a whiteboard anyway, so I just use an electronic copy. But, yes, you would use it the same way.
  18. Oh, there are plenty of British Spellers out there! Webster made his so we could have our own, at first about half of the U.S. market was British Spellers. Dillworth's is the one Webster learned to read with: http://books.google.com/books?id=OIgSAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=dilworth&hl=en&ei=AyeQTfqyHMHF0QGxj7CpCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
  19. Week 24: Short week due to the local homeschooling convention. D1. ASH ESH ISH OSH USH; BRAKE DRAKE FLAKE SPAKE; GLARE SHARE SNARE SPARE BRAVE CRAVE GRAVE SAVE D2. CA CE CI CO CU CY; SCA SCE SCI SCO SCU SCY; HENCE FENCE PENCE SENSE; MINCE SINCE PRINCE RINSE; BLEED SEED SPEED STEED D3. CA CE CI CO CU CY; SCA SCE SCI SCO SCU SCY; AND ACT APT ELL EBB EGG END ILL INK FACT FAN LEFT SELF ELSE The words from day 3 looked easy to me, and are commonly taught earlier in most phonics programs. However, many of them were difficult for him, about the same difficulty as he has had with each new group of words. I guess Webster really did know what he was doing!
  20. Week 21: D1: ank enk ink onk unk; blank flank frank prank bank. This was a difficult sound for him, so we only did a few words. D2: ash esh ish osh ush; blush flush plush crush, fleet sheet street greet D3: ca ce ci co cu cy; brace chafe grace space, price slice spice twice D4: phonics concentration game with CVC and CVCE words. Week 22: D1. ank enk ink onk unk; bank blank tank flank frank prank D2. and end ind nod und; band grand stand strand, bank tank D3. at bat bate, en ten teen, it sit site, on not note, up mut mute D4. Concentration game, CVC, CVCE Week 23: D1. Blank tank, feet fleet, brace grace, price lice D2. At et it ot ut, ta te ti to tu ti; bless dress press stress, sheet, brine D3. Frank prank, grace space, stand hand, rice price D4. Concentration game, CVC, CVCE
  21. Week 19: D1. AK EK IK OK UK; KA KE KI KO KU KY; GALE PALE SALE COPE HOPE FIVE HIVE D2. FADE MADE; BIDE RIDE SIDE; BAKE CAKE; DATE FATE; DINE FINE; DOTE VOTE D3. AB EB IB OB UB BAB EB BIB BOB BUB BA BE BI BO BU BY FADE MADE; PINE FINE; BONE TONE; MUTE CUTE; TUNE DUNE D4. GA GE GI GO GU GY; CA CE CI CO CU CY; CAGE PAGE AGE WAGE AP EP IP OP UP; GAP GEM (Explained how g is like c, with a different sound before e, i, and y.) Week 20: D1. GALE SALE; PIPE RIPE; HOPE ROPE; FIVE HIVE; DAME CAME D2. SIDE RIDE TIDE; IN-SIDE BE-SIDE; WORE TORE BORE NOSE DOSE HOSE ROSE; CAME SAME BE-CAME (Explained that s sometimes has a z sound. He didn't like the 2 syllable words, but he did well with them!) D3. FARE TARE DARE MARE; COPE HOPE ROPE POPE; DICE MICE NICE RICE; FILE BILE PILE VILE (He got a choice of six 2 syllable words or 16 silent e words, he picked 16 "easy" words.) (My son does not guess at all from word families. He has read the first 10 I See Sam books, and guesses a bit from them, we will not read any more for a while. If he guessed from word families, I would mix up the words so that he was forced to sound them out. Since he does not guess, I'm doing a few from word family so he can see the pattern and the rhyme.) D4. Read, Write, Type online computer program, long vowels. (A fun break!)
  22. You're welcome! Yes, you can use it with your children together. They used it in the one-room schools with various ages together. Do the syllabary first together until they all learn it well. Then, they will vary in the speed with which they progress through the rest of the speller, but they will learn a lot by silently watching the lesson that is not theirs. You also want to start each day with a few syllables all together. You really want to over-learn the syllables. For your 8 year old and 10 year old, you could add in my spelling rules. After the syllabary, you could work quickly through the program on my how to tutor page, but just read and spell a few words from each blend phonics unit while covering the spelling rules. Then, you could move directly to the 2 syllable words in Webster, skipping the 1 syllable words in Webster.
  23. Don Potter recently sent me this explanation that a mutual phonics friend of ours, Dr. Roth, wrote about how they were used along with an explanation from the 1600's: http://donpotter.net/pdf_files/syllabary_brinkley_roth.pdf Warning: The explanation from the 1600's is not exactly in English, it must be read without little people running around making noise and when you are not too tired. (Do any of you have time like that???:lol::lol::lol: If so, please start a thread about it!!!:) Yes, I know, quiet time. We do need to start formal quiet time. My children usually spend an hour a day on their own happily playing together upstairs quietly, so I haven't mandated quiet time yet.)
×
×
  • Create New...