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Lisa R.

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About Lisa R.

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    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

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  1. I do not wish for this thread to debate specifics such as whether or not masks are helpful stopping the spread of Covid-19. I'm just using masks as an example of a much larger problem regarding the contradictory information we are receiving. The purpose of this thread is to discuss the confusion of articles and videos and interviews saying opposite viewpoints. Actually, viewpoints is likely the wrong word. People are making scientific statements which should either be proven true or false, correct? For example, "scientifically, masks prevent the spread of Covid-19" and then another article says, "scientifically, masks do not stop the spread of Covid-19". Or "masks are safe to wear all day" or "mask are unhealthy to wear all day". In both of these cases, one is true, and the other is false. Again, these are just two paraphrased examples to show that, to those of us who are not medically trained, it has been somewhat confusing to find truth. I have a relative, scientifically trained, who recommends the information coming from Johns Hopkins. So, between talking to her and Johns Hopkins information, I have developed a way to try and sort through the confusion. You can subscribe to the Johns Hopkins newsletter here: https://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/news/newsletters/e-newsletter-sign-up.html How are you sorting through this contradictory information?
  2. Thank you for that dog-walking tip. Yes, I made the leash shorter and encouraged a faster walk with less sniffing. This worked quite well. He did get quite a bit more exercise this way.
  3. I hid the 1/2 Benadryl tablet in cheese and it worked! Thanks for the tip.
  4. I have never had a dog before. DH has allergies to dogs, and that was the biggest reason we never had one. We are at home A LOT now, and youngest DD is home from college. So, there are 3 adults in the house with lots of time. I signed up with a fostering agency and told them I had the time to help, but I would need a hypoallergenic breed. A yorker came available, and we picked him up on Tuesday. He was given up by a woman who adopted him from a shelter two months ago. His age is unknown, but they estimated he is 5 or 6 years old. This woman also gave up a 6 month old cat who had kittens, so she was just a terrible animal owner. 😞 The poor little dog was covered in fleas and given flea treatments the night we took him. He is a delight. He is totally house trained, hardly barks, and only needs attention. He likes to sit near us all day long. His teeth are terrible, and he will only eat wet food, which the agency provided. He does not appear to drink much. Fleas were gone the first night, but he does scratch a lot. He looks like a mess--long hair in places, very little hair in other places. Scabs. Two cuts on his head that are healing. I was told I could give him 1/2 Benadryl, but he won't take the pill wrapped in bread/coated with peanut butter. We've given him a couple baths to try and alleviate some of the itching. The agency has scheduled a vet visit for Wednesday. He would be the perfect dog for a retired couple. He doesn't demand anything; he just wants company.. If I walk around the house he follows me right on my heels. He stays downstairs and does not even try to go up the stairs. He can jump right up on the couch, so I'm not sure why he doesn't even attempt the stairs. Questions: I am giving him 2/3 can of wet food. I was told to sprinkle some dry food in, too, but he will not eat that. I feed him 2x/day--1/3 can each time. He hardly drinks at all. He gobbles up the food instantly. Is this ok? He LOVES us. When we pet him and pause, he will put his paw on our arm so we keep petting him. He lays in front of us so we can rub his belly. However, when one of us comes downstairs at first, he growls. Then he is so happy to see us--lots of tail wagging. Why does he growl? He has such a gentle nature. I thought Yorkies barked a lot. I'm wondering if he would bark is he was left alone. Since it is quarantine, someone is always at home. I'm wondering how he would do if he was left alone in the house. He is not playful at all. He just loves to sit with us. I'm wondering if his age is older than we were told. Even with baths, he doesn't smell great. Is this because he keeps licking his fur--to help itching or his bad teeth? Should we be doing anything else? Since my dh doesn't seem to have any allergic reaction, I'm tempted to keep him. But I work 3 days/week, and I'm not sure how he would do alone. I know there are lots of dog lovers and dog experts here. Any feedback or help is appreciated.
  5. I have never had a dog before. DH has allergies to dogs, and that was the biggest reason we never had one. We are at home A LOT now, and youngest DD is home from college. So, there are 3 adults in the house with lots of time. I signed up with a fostering agency and told them I had the time to help, but I would need a hypoallergenic breed. A yorker came available, and we picked him up on Tuesday. He was given up by a woman who adopted him from a shelter two months ago. His age is unknown, but they estimated he is 5 or 6 years old. This woman also gave up a 6 month old cat who had kittens, so she was just a terrible animal owner. 😞 The poor little dog was covered in fleas and given flea treatments the night we took him. He is a delight. He is totally house trained, hardly barks, and only needs attention. He likes to sit near us all day long. His teeth are terrible, and he will only eat wet food, which the agency provided. He does not appear to drink much. Fleas were gone the first night, but he does scratch a lot. He looks like a mess--long hair in places, very little hair in other places. Scabs. Two cuts on his head that are healing. I was told I could give him 1/2 Benadryl, but he won't take the pill wrapped in bread/coated with peanut butter. We've given him a couple baths to try and alleviate some of the itching. The agency has scheduled a vet visit for Wednesday. He would be the perfect dog for a retired couple. He doesn't demand anything; he just wants company.. If I walk around the house he follows me right on my heels. He stays downstairs and does not even try to go up the stairs. He can jump right up on the couch, so I'm not sure why he doesn't even attempt the stairs. Questions: I am giving him 2/3 can of wet food. I was told to sprinkle some dry food in, too, but he will not eat that. I feed him 2x/day--1/3 can each time. He hardly drinks at all. He gobbles up the food instantly. Is this ok? He LOVES us. When we pet him and pause, he will put his paw on our arm so we keep petting him. He lays in front of us so we can rub his belly. However, when one of us comes downstairs at first, he growls. Then he is so happy to see us--lots of tail wagging. Why does he growl? He has such a gentle nature. I thought Yorkies barked a lot. I'm wondering if he would bark is he was left alone. Since it is quarantine, someone is always at home. I'm wondering how he would do if he was left alone in the house. He is not playful at all. He just loves to sit with us. I'm wondering if his age is older than we were told. Even with baths, he doesn't smell great. Is this because he keeps licking his fur--to help itching or his bad teeth? Should we be doing anything else? Since my dh doesn't seem to have any allergic reaction, I'm tempted to keep him. But I work 3 days/week, and I'm not sure how he would do alone. I know there are lots of dog lovers and dog experts here. Any feedback or help is appreciated.
  6. Women now have the luxury of doing what they want and wearing what they want. No make up, no hair color, no tailed clothing? Fine. I prefer to fight it. I found that once I hit my 40s, it took more effort to maintain the way I wanted to look. Clothing needed to be more fitted, make up adjusted, hair color touched up and touched up more often. Exercise and diet become more critical as metabolism changed. For anyone wanted to fight middle aged frump (and, again, it’s fine if you don’t!), I suggest: -trip to Sephora. Ask one of the staff to help update makeup to current style and changing skin -ask a hair stylist you trust to update hair cut. If you haven’t changed your hair style in the past 10 years, an update will do wonders. Consider whether or not to color. -donate clothes that don’t fit well. Choose clothes that fit well and cover problem areas. White House Black Market is a great place to start. They have great sales and great fit and styles for middle age. Their staff is trained to help choose clothes so help is available if you don’t know where to start. You could choose all sale items and look great. Same goes for Soma. -find an exercise you don’t hate. You don’t have to love it. For someone who didn’t work out when younger, regular exercise in your 40s will make you feel better than you did in your 20s and 30s. Once your hit your 50s, you’ll be glad you started. -I wish I had good nutrition advice. All I know is that it’s important and we all have different needs in this area!
  7. Wait. What? I thought money from any job you get would be set aside to give you a safety net. Why would you offer this or even the possibility of this?
  8. Exactly this. My youngest just left for college and my circle is filled with people my age with college-aged kids. Some moms are really struggling. The ones that aren’t are the those that cultivated a live outside their kids. They are great moms—involved and attentive—but they have a solid friend group and regular volunteering or part time/full time job. I maintain its good for our kids, particularly our daughters, to see us having balance in our lives. Balance gets easier to achieve, I believe, as our kids get older. We need to work at it and plan ahead for it. A part time job can do wonders, by the way. I’d start there.
  9. How do you score the food? Points for presentation and taste? I was thinking of bonus points if the dish was homemade. (I think a couple participants might purchase a favorite treat or dish.) In our competitive group, bonus points would encourage homemade items while allowing prepare food also helps everyone participate.
  10. I do love the idea about the food contest. I think I might do this at Christmas. This works for me in two different ways: 1) it’s a fun Christmas game 2) it’s a great way to have a potluck dinner and share food preparation time for me. It also accomplishes one of my goals to get everyone to participate and not just want me plan and execute everything.
  11. We have adult children and aging parents at our Christmas gathering. Most of us purchase items we need and want throughout the year, so no one has a long Christmas list. Any fun or memorable ideas instead of buying Christmas presents for everyone? In the past we've: -drawn names and adults purchase items up for an agreed upon amount for the name drawn. We've done this with wish-lists provided and without. -gone on a vacation over Christmas break and made it clear that the vacation was the present. This is my favorite idea, but we won't be doing it this year. -I had a white elephant-type game where I bought all the gifts which were desirable because they were nice or desirable because they were funny. Gifts were stolen and fought over and it was really fun. I've done this 3x. -Last year I did an "auction" using Monopoly money. If anyone's seen Survivor, it was similar. I had a variety of items, gave everyone the same amount of play money and held the auction. It was a surprise to have the auction and was fun. For the white elephant game and auction, I had: things like a nice blanket, games ( Catan and Code Names), home made fudge, Christmas ornaments, a new cooking gadget, a new book, etc. The most in-demand item is always the certificate I make. One year it gave the certificate winner the ability to be exempt from putting away Christmas decorations. One year it gave the power to require the family to watch of movie of the certificate-holders choice. Any ideas of fun ideas that make memories and involve a gift but don't involve spending lots of time thinking of ideas, purchasing, wrapping and giving stuff that we could just get ourselves? (Disclaimer: none of us are really good with crafts, so while the "every gift has to be homemade" works well for some families, it would flop over here. LOL)
  12. I would discuss this “subtle” approach with an attorney. I’m not sure if this is needed. Maybe even get a second opinion on it.
  13. Heart, you are trying so hard. We can all feel this. You have limited time and energy and you’ve received so much advice here. I would limit your energies to a few areas: 1) get some free legal advice 2) set aside some money in a separate, private bank account 3) get a job 4) continue to take care of your children Please do no spend energy on: 1) justifying with him any decision you make whether it is regarding child rearing or finances or getting a job for anything else. You are an adult and can make these decisions and no discussion is needed. 2) helping dh with any task he is capable of performing himself. This includes getting him coffee or packing or making his lunch or, really, anything else. I highly recommend you get a job. Any job even if the pay isn’t great. You will need the car for this and you don’t need to listen to his objections. He will quickly realize the money isn’t going into a joint account. No need for discussion about this other than, “this is what I’ve decided to do. I’m not discussing it further.” Let him rant and walk away. The dynamic will shift dramatically in your home. You will need to make sure you and your children are safe.
  14. We’d like to do a New England color tour mid October. In what city would you start? Any suggestions are welcome. We have about 7 days.
  15. OP, why the conflict over clothes? You’ve chosen to place your daughter in an environment, this high school, where the clothing standards are different from yours. Even though you’d prefer otherwise, can you find a way to let this go? You’re requiring a standard that’s making your daughter feel awkward in a new environment. First the jeans and now the shorts. Trust me, resentment will build over this, and it isn’t worth it I’d find a way to say “yes”, if you could. There will be much bigger issues where you may need to say “no”. Save the “no” for those times. The shorts in your link are typical teenage shorts.
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