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Everything posted by Carrousel

  1. Sweetpea, we've shared comments back and forth over the years about our sons and math. I've got an 10 year old, 5th/6th also. We opted to start AOPS Pre-A this semester over finishing Beast. ONly two weeks in, but so far so good. He loves the videos and explanations, and has been fine on the frustration/challenge front. I've not pushed for pace yet, just letting him do 45 minutes or so split between lesson work and Alcumus, Since you already have it, might be worth a try. We're just going to go slow, not rush, and let it work until it doesn't work. Just want to encourage you that he may be ready for the more "grown up" format before you think he is, and that the challenge level in the first chapter has been less than BA5.
  2. What resources do you recommend for anatomy for middle grades/early logic stage? We have books, looking for add ons, such as apps, coloring book, models, etc.
  3. Where's Toto, did the lessons plans you're using for EdScratch come with the Edison's bots? My younger one is wanting me to do a robotics class for his age, but I don't want to shell out for multiple we do 2.0, since we have one and it's staying power isn't awesome as they grow.
  4. I'll be interested to see how BA online changes the practice element, but as is, no, I don't use it as complete. I use it as a problem solving and logic strand, and use Singapore as our main curriculum for math.
  5. My DS is nearly the same, turning 11, coming from Singapore, my plan was for AOPS pre-A in January. We've been watching pre-A videos from AOPS and Derek Owens samples just to get a feel for it, and I think DO just feels more accessible for the younger age group. I need to get the AOPS pre-A text ordered, but I'm considering doing DO first, then lopping thru AOPS. Whine, like what I did with Singapore and beast. Be interested to hear what you all do! Pre-Algebra curriculum is worse than learn to read curriculum! Too many choices and too much angst! I seriously think I could actually teach pre A in less time than I've spent researching and worrying about it!
  6. I'm using google classroom for a co op life science class I'm teaching. I really like the set up and hope it will help the students complete their homework easily and independently. I'd love to see how other homeschoolers or co op classes ar setting it up and what features you're using, if anyone wants to exchange class codes and compare notes.
  7. WeDo would be outgrown very very quickly at his age. Keep saving for mindstorms. If unsure if he could handle it or want more info, watch some you tubes, or ev3lessons.com programming lessons and download the mindstorm software (home edition is free) to see if he feels comfortable.
  8. Any creative types want to help me? I'm teaching a co op science class, and planning to give the kids points for doing readings, watching videos before class, completing homework, sharing a project, participating in class. It's kind like Who's Line Is It, Anyways, where the points don't matter. No grades are given, unless parent assigns grade to their own student, so the points don't really equate to anything. I would like to make a list of "ranks" or "levels" that the students can claim as they earn points for class. Lighthearted and motivational is the goal. I need help with what to call the ranks. Would like to have 8-12 ranks. Lab Rat 0-14 points Lab Assistant 15-29 points Beaker 30-44 points Bunsen Honeydew 45-59 points Mad Scientist 60-74 points Albert Einstein 75-89 points Dr. Doofenhsmirtz 90-104 points Would really like some creative help, my brain just won't fill in the details well tonight!
  9. Hated. Has nothing to do with phonics and everything to do with computer and typing skills. And the pictures are odd. Really enjoy using the workbooks though!
  10. Would you also mind sharing what mosdos levels you had and if you thought the workbook was worth it or not? Thanks!
  11. I'm not sure if you've had a chance to look at the ev3lessons site yet or not, there's LOTS of material there, and they have a Beyond section that gives additional resources. We also purchased a previous year's FLL challenge and began working on it for fun and challenge. You may want to look for a robotics club or FLL team in your area if you want to go beyond what's on that site with Mindstorms.
  12. Ev3lessons.com is good, free, and easy to follow for newbies.
  13. Continually in flux, but current thoughts: Math-- finish Singapore 5, beast 4 and 5 as supplements, start some kind of pre-A LA-- I struggle making decisions and implementing here. Writing-- Using W&R narrative 1 now, claims it is his favorite subject, so continuing this series. Handwriting-- cursive practice, add typing. Spelling-- Spelling workout Grammar-- need to figure out. Did a word roots program for 4th in this spot. Literature-- thinking of Mosdos, a few novel studies, and some Shakespeare, need to figure out how to implement that. Figuratively speaking unit. Science-- life science with labs at co op History-- American year 1 at co op Art-- at co op Spanish-- at co op, need to add at home component here since he is asking for more Logic-- need to add Geography-- continue map tracing weekly Programming-- robotics team, would like to set aside time for practicing at home each week also PE-- at co op, swim team, seasonal rec sports Memory work-- timeline song, CC history and science sentences, vocabulary words It looks like so much written out. Literature, Spanish at home, and logic will be additions, so hopefully we will be able to manage these!
  14. Edeemafie, did you end up using this? How did you like it?
  15. And I like the rescue game idea, I'll have to do that one, they'd love it!
  16. Mine do jumping jacks, sit ups, etc while doing flash cards or spelling words. We also play lots of easy games this way-- answer the question or card, get a turn in tic tac toe or sorry, or trouble or any other game they like, shoot nerf suction darts at questions or math problems on a white board, etc. almost anything can be turned into a game this way. Get 1 lego piece for every math problem, then build a scene (the mini holiday promo poly bags are great for this). Mr. potato head works well for this too. Hangman, build a snowman or robot on a marker board (useful for getting a day's tasks done too, each time a subject or chore is done you get a piece added). Simple as it is, mine like starting at the top of the steps and answering questions to move down one step if correct or back up one if wrong, and getting to bottom of steps gets snack or dismissed for a few mites play break, etc. I need to do this more, I try for 2X a week right now, but my average is probably closer to 1x a week.
  17. Finished Farmer Boy, audio books Narnia in progress, audio books Percy Jackson in the other car. Starting advent readings on Thursday this week. Would like to read A Christmas Carol also in December, any recommendations for a good edition for elementary boys?
  18. b has a belly, d wears a diaper. Add some little eyes and a mouth and it gets enough of a visual. My silly boys liked that explanation.
  19. Mostly commiserating, as we are messy people who don't like mess too. I read the Kon Mari book and did a major whole house declutter and that helped jump start me, although I don't think mine was a one and done type event like she suggests. It did help me become more choosy about what I bring into the house, and I find myself thinking about where something will go and how much it will be worn or used before I buy it. Small routines and habits have worked best for me so far. Bed made, bathroom sink wiped, empty kitchen sink, all help me feel like our house is decently presentable. Basement rec room and kids rooms are almost never presentable on a moment's notice but I'm not sweating it yet. The "one touch" rule is helping too-- you touch something one time-- when you take off shoes or a coat, you don't lay them on the couch or leave them by the chair, you touch them once-- they go straight to their put away spot. Same for purses, backpacks, sports equipment, etc. My biggest challenge is horizontal clutter--- kitchen island, dressers, desk all have piles on them that are dropped there or "sorted" but not dealt with or filed, etc. I keep visualizing empty counters and a cleared off dresser, and am trying to figure out how to make that a reality in our house! I find when I have a vase of flowers on the kitchen island, I don't want anything messy around them so I clean it off. If only I could have fresh flowers there all the time! :)
  20. I am trying the folder system this year, and so far, so good. I prepped 75 days worth of folders for my older son to test if it would work for us. I did days instead of weeks because I knew we would have several planned 3 or 4 day weeks based on other events. I used colored folders (red, orange, yellow, green, blue) in rotations of 5 so that I could easily "loop" subjects into them. Geography is always in the red folder, handwriting is orange and green, typing is yellow, etc. I don't really care if geography is always on Monday, but I want it regularly done in rotation. If I make it "Monday" instead of red folder days, then when all the holidays or field trips fall on a Monday, boom, it's January and we've only done 15% of the geography for the year (ask me how I know this can happen...). We don't put math in folders since he changes speeds a lot in math. We just do math every day. I am liking this system. Even on an out of the house day, we can throw the day's folder and his math book in the backpack, and get a solid amount of school work done with little to no hassle of packing up. And it's totally my neurosis, which ds has apparently inherited, but he pushes himself to finish a rainbow (week's set) every week. He knows the blue folders have a fun thing in them (drawing page, silly comic, etc.) and he looks forward to those on Fridays. When before we would've skipped the day's table time on a busy day, this makes it almost effortless and creates a strong sense of routine and accomplishment when finishing a week. This was a great way to transition to independent work for my 9 year old so I could get focused time with my 5 year old. Only things the 9 yo can do 90% independently go in the folder. He knows he can do his folder and reading while its 5 yo mom time. Surprisingly, the folder work has also freed up enough of my nagging and managing all the different small pieces time, that we are now getting 2-3 days of morning time a week in. I struggled to make time for morning time prior. Now, when I have to plan the next 75 days during winter break, I may be regretting this, but so far, so good!
  21. I read it, and took away that more hours and more homework doesn't necessarily equal smarter kids. Schools in our area seem determined to prove that equation is true. Found the author's theories on teacher recruitment and training, and lack of selectivity incoming into the profession, as a reason for lack of respect for teachers interesting. It's been awhile since I read it, but it did make me think about how many things are wrong with our country's general approach to education in the compulsory years. I don't think it changed how I homeschool, just made me thankful that I do!
  22. We aren't using WOL but I was following the thread bc I was considering using it. For helping verbs, there's a song on Pinterest or you tube that is to the tune of jingle bells,starts with "helping verbs, helping verbs, there are 23..." That we used, and it was an easy way to remember them.
  23. We listened to a dragon's guide to the care and feeding of humans after the how to train your dragon ones, and my kids loved it.
  24. A couple easy things my DS5 (and older DS9) have really enjoyed, that are inexpensive and relevant: David Maculey book on how machines work: https://www.amazon.com/How-Machines-Work-Zoo-Break/dp/1465440127/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1470850728&sr=8-2&keywords=zoo+break+book Klutz crazy contraptions book and parts set: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=crazy+contraptions Robot Turtles Programming game. LEGO Technic sets, the smaller ones run around $20. We give these things often as gifts. I'd start with these types of things as free play choices and if she responds well and enjoys them, then think about getting some bigger sets or more in depth resources.
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