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Shifra

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About Shifra

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    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

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  1. I am taking a course from Lynda. I get a free subscription to Lynda from my local library. I can just log in from home using my library card. The course I am taking is Adobe Illustrator for Fashion Design, which is a fantasy dream for me, but with a free course, I figured, why not. The course is very good. I already had the book that the instructor of this course wrote, so I was familiar with the background information of this course. However, it is helpful to see what the instructor is referring to. Anyway, my point is that you should check with your local library to see if you can use
  2. I found the book What High Schools Don't Tell You by Elizabeth Wissner-Gross enlightening. She claimed that every child has an interest, it's just a matter of finding that interest and using it to motivate him/her to go on and do other things. If you can find this book and in particular look at page 9, it might help. This book also has lists of ideas for summer programs to get your child's interests moving in a productive manner. Now this book can be irritating in it's "Ivy League or bust" attitude, but if you can get beyond that, it can be helpful.
  3. Well, Faber Piano Adventures has a series of supplemental songbooks that are based on levels: Pretime, Playtime, Showtime, Chordtime, Funtime, and Bigtime. These are available in different genres such as Classical Music, Popular, Favorites, Rock 'n Roll, Jazz & Blues, Hymns, Kids Songs, Ragtime & Marches, Christmas, Jewish Favorites, and Halloween. Teaching Little Fingers to Play also has supplements available in various genres. Alfred has supplements called "Fun Book," "Popular Hits," "Patriotic Solos," "Top Hits," "Merry Christmas," "Praise Hits," "Classic Themes," and "Hymn Boo
  4. I figured I'd chime in with some memories of the school trips I took in kindergarten and first grade. I went to school in the mid-1970's, when "social studies" still had a "progressive education" bent. I read a book geared towards teachers highlighting how important field trips are to science and social studies, Out of the Classroom and into the World by Salvatore Vascellaro. This book is a continuation of the progressive education movement and tradition. Among the suggestions that he had for first-grade teachers were trips to the shoemaker and trips to a tailor. When I was in kindergarten
  5. My school (a parochial girls school) taught us to read in the mid-1970's using Old Court Readers. While I used the Well Trained Mind's recommendations of Plaid Phonics Level A to teach my son to read the year that I homeschooled him, once he finished Level A, I had him use as a reader McGuffey's Primer and Open Court Basic Readers: Reading is Fun. This website explains the levels of Open Court Basic Readers (as used from 1963 to 1976). At the time, they were considered the best phonics based reading program.
  6. Years ago, in the first edition of In Their Own Way: Discovering and Encouraging Your Child's Multiple Intelligences by Thomas Armstrong, he recommended a social studies curriculum that is long out of print: (Hu)mans: A Course of Study. I even wrote Dr. Armstrong to ask where to obtain this curriculum! Anyway, it is now available for free on the web at http://www.macosonline.org/
  7. I went to school in a religious girls school without competitive sports, so there was no peer or other pressure to join a team sport. We played basketball, softball, and occasionally tennis as pick up games but no official leagues. However, swimming was a common extracurricular activity, and several of us became lifeguards in high school. American Red Cross lifeguarding classes can be taken as young as age 15. It makes a good summer (and year round, if you live near an indoor pool) income for teenagers. There's also learning how to canoe, row, and sail, which can be a competitive sport or
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