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jkl

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About jkl

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    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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  1. Ds13 will be finished with CLE 700s before Christmas. He does well on the tests, but struggles to really understand the information/concepts. I had planned on having him do CLE 801-805 and then doing CLE Algebra in 9th grade. However, I really feel like he needs a more conceptual grasp of some of these concepts, and I am not a good math teacher this year (I am struggling with some health issues and I have a daughter struggling with a variety of issues as well). I am reading that MUS Algebra seems to be a little light to many, and I'm wondering if it would be a good idea to have him work through it before switching to a different Alg in 9th grade. We school year round, so he would have longer than a traditional semester to finish it. Thoughts?
  2. She sounds very, very similar to my 10 year old daughter. She also has a variety of diagnoses including OCD, ADD, etc. Right now, I am in the process of making a list of the math skills she has mastered and what she needs to work on, then I plan to get a variety or resources to teach her those skills. (This is my grand plan, anyway! I am struggling!) Traditional curriculum is not doing the job for her!
  3. I have to be right beside her when she works because she finds it difficult and to keep her focused on her math. I could not do 40 minutes of math with her in one sitting. She would completely shut down. It's something to work toward. I like the idea of having a pile of activities that address different things. I would LOVE to hire someone to work with her on math but I don't think that's an option right now. She is already on medication to address the OCD. I hated to even do that, but it has helped. I guess I'll try and keep an open mind! I really actually liked the look of the Tang math sheets. And the quiche! 🙂
  4. Thank you so much for all of this! dd has an average IQ. I will look at all of those links you shared! I am not a strong math teacher and I am not a good spontaneous seize-the-math opportunity kind of person either. I need a few resources and then I can slot them into our day. This year we spend about 15-20 minutes a day on her lesson and she does math drill on the computer a few days a week for about 15 minutes. I sometimes put math sheets (review) in her independent work folder, but she struggles to do those without me right at her side directing her to the next problem. I think for the summer and next year, I would like to have us do 2 math slots most days, maybe 15 or 20 minutes each.
  5. Just adding another example: She has memorized her "2s" multiplication facts to 2x10 because she understands that you double the other number, but she can not show me what 2x2 means, even though we have been over it many many times using manipulatives...
  6. Please don't quote--I probably will delete for privacy. Dd is 10. She has a variety of learning and mental health differences (official diagnoses include OCD--pretty severe, even with therapy and meds she struggles--, sensory processing delays including slow processing speed, and fine motor delays). She also has a diagnosis of ADD-rule out, which apparently means she probably has ADD-inattentive but the OCD is getting in the way of a firm diagnosis. I also strongly suspect that she is on the Autism spectrum, although the eval said no. Eval also says no learning disability in math. We are planning on having her reevaluated in the middle of next school year. Anyway, she is working comfortably on about a late 3rd grade level for everything except math. For math, we have done a combination of Math Lessons for a Living Education level 2/ 3 and Developmental Math (book 5 --for review this year). She has a terrific memory and she has mastered all of her addition and subtraction facts up to 20. She can regroup in addition and subtraction problems and get the correct answer. However, I feel she has no real understanding of math. For example, she can get the answer to 4+___ =9 because she recognizes that 4 and 5 and 9 go together. However, when given a problem like 13+ ___ =21, she has no idea how to figure out the correct answer, even if she has a pile of counting bears or beans (the only manipulatives she will tolerate). I feel like she has memorized enough to get by in our curriculum, but she is not really understanding. Does this make sense? I feel like we do our math lesson and she looks at me blankly like nothing is getting through, unless there is a "trick" she can memorize, and then she is fine. I am unsure how to proceed here. I'm thinking of dividing our math time into 2 different sessions and playing games during one (Ronit Bird stuff??) and working through the curriculum in the other, but do I just keep going in her curriculum even though I don't think she truly understanding? I'm rambling!! Can someone please advise? I need a plan! Thanks!
  7. I really lie the loks of Beyond the Book Report (Season 3) and WIndows to the World. I'll be keeping both in mind for 9th grade! For 8th, I think what I am going to do is just use the resources I have (Thinking in Threes, Writer's Jungle, some MP lit guides, etc), and make a big list of assignments (creative and essay-type) and let him work through the list. So, I'm thinking things like reports related to his science topics, writing an alternative ending for a book he's just read, summaries from history and lit, imitating the style of his favorite author, some of the essays from the Hobbit lit guide, etc. I think he will enjoy selecting his own assignments from the ones I provide. He is going to be outlining in history (I may teach him Cornell style note-taking) and writing mini-lit essays like in the WTM. He keeps a commonplace book on his own. I think I have enough resources to help me review each type of writing before he begins each assignment... Thanks for the advice everyone!
  8. I love that you are so excited about this! I have to check it out!
  9. Thanks everyone. I think what I am going to do is just use the resources I have (Thinking in Threes, Writer's Jungle, some MP lit guides, etc), and make a big list of assignments (creative and essay-type) and let him work through the list. So, I'm thinking things like reports related to his science topics, writing an alternative ending for a book he's just read,summaries from history and lit, imitating the style of his favorite author, some of the essays from the Hobbit lit guide, etc. I think he will enjoy selecting his own assignments from the ones I provide. He is going to be outlining in history (I may teach him Cornell style note-taking) and writing mini-lit essays like in the WTM. He keeps a commonplace book on his own. I think I have enough resources to help me review each type of writing before he begins each assignment...
  10. Ha! Good point! You are totally right! I will look into all of these. Thanks!
  11. You're right, he would enjoy the history based or Narnia ones. It looks like we need to have some prior experience with IEW, though. I wish we had done the IEW intro course this year. That had been my original plan, but I switched at the last minute!
  12. Hmm. Looking at Jump In a little more, it reminds me of EIW. There is something about that informal format that bugs me. 🙂 I think that's why I am drawn to WWS. I'm not ruling it out, though.
  13. I forgot about that one. That looks promising. I think I'll print off samples and have him look at them along with the sample of WWS and the Bravewriter thing I was thinking of.
  14. I am driving myself crazy trying to figure out writing for 8th grade. ds13 has done the WWE series and Treasured Conversations and various other pieces of things . This year we tried EIW. We both hated it! He enjoys writing research reports using note taking, an outline, etc. He has done lots of creative writing in the past, but doesn't seem to enjoy that so much now. I had planned on using WWS1, but looking at the samples, I can tell he will resist it! He loves history and loves to read. He and I work best together when I teach him a small lesson or we have a short discussion and then leave him to complete the work while I am available to answer questions or give my input. I am a fairly good writer, but I like guidelines! Can anyone suggest anything that will prepare him for high school level writing?
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