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Finnella

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    327
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43 Excellent

About Finnella

  • Rank
    Hive Mind Level 4 Worker: Builder Bee
  • Birthday May 14

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  • Gender
    Female

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  • Biography
    Married mother of 2 DSs.
  • Location
    North Carolina
  1. Another entry for Ancient History: We're almost finished with Famous Romans, and we've enjoyed it. (Nothing could compete with that ancient technology course.) The professor is good at making links to modern history. My son finally gets why I've been so intent on his studying the Romans. In retrospect, I wish I'd also gotten the Famous Greeks course. The professor does have an odd lecturing style, but my son got past it fairly quickly. You'll see references to it in the reviews on the site. Speaking as a former Classics major, I think the content is solid. There are some visuals, but I expect people could get by with the audio version. (My son and I don't do well with that format.) The lecturer we couldn't abide was Linwood Thompson of World History. This set has gotten good reviews on this forum and on the Great Courses site. The first lecture we watched was his overview of ancient Greece. He did it in an awful Southern accent. It might not bother other people, but it was an excruciating experience for Southerners.
  2. Easily the biggest success for our study of Ancient History has been the course on Greek and Roman Technology. My son loved it and now wants the other course by Professor Ressler. He even asked to read the chapter in our history book that covers Roman technology, and this is a kid who never asks to do any work I don't force him to do. The professor uses lots of scale models and computer recreations to demonstrate how various machines worked; it's a fascinating class. I loved it too.
  3. I was already ill when I had to start homeschooling. I have fibromyalgia, along with a list of many other things. We can't afford Catholic or private school either, so it was a choice between bringing our younger son home or having him continue in a horrible situation.
  4. The standard test for low thyroid function looks at only one factor and assumes that your body is adequately completing the process to make the form of T3 that you need. You are lucky your doctor dug deeper. The typical test said everything was fine for me. I finally pushed him to test more deeply after a friend was diagnosed with Hashimoto's. Sure enough, I really did have low thyroid function. I'm big on generic meds, but I have found that thyroid meds are one of the few where name brand is better. I was on Synthroid first and only my blood tests looked better. I didn't feel any better until a doctor did a trial of Armour. I haven't found Armour to be terribly expensive, and I pay close attention because I take so many medications. But if the cost is a problem, in addition to shopping around, you may want to try Synthroid eventually. I recommend you don't switch until after you've had the chance to feel better, which will hopefully happen on Armour. Otherwise you won't know if the switch to Synthroid is treating your problem better, worse, or the same as Armour.
  5. I need to qualify my vote for Discovery of Deduction. We used its prequel, the Art of Argument last year. It worked very well, and my DS recently used lots of what he learned to discuss a magazine article. (And this was without my prompting.) He'll be in 8th grade next year, and I already have Discovery of Deduction to continue his logic studies. Based on what you say about your son, I doubt he'd get much out of Art of Argument, and I haven't read anything to indicate that you have to do that before moving to Discovery.
  6. I ordered mine mid-July and got them today. The entire set of 3 hardback books, two TMs, and two SGs are now $96.40. It's an incredible deal. Thanks for the very detailed information. I think this will be a very interesting year for us with science!
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