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Deniseibase

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About Deniseibase

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  1. Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank. It's more about the post-catastrophe survival than the nuclear war itself, and it does a better job than any other similar book I've read with the little details. Very realistic. Upsetting rather than sensational.
  2. Picturesque Book of Progress has no fictional content, or science, just history (as seen through the lens of the culture of 1930s America, of course). It's good for logic stage - I wouldn't use it for a younger child without some editing as facts and attitudes are different now. But if you want to start giving an older child an interesting window into how people viewed the world several decades ago, it's pretty neat.
  3. Oh I'm sorry I didn't get in on this thread earlier :) I have the My Book House set from the 1930s. I had them as a child and my mother SOLD THEM when I was away at college!! WHAT was she thinking! So of course I spent the next 15 years tracking down a nice set that wasn't $500. Olive Beaupre Miller also did a lovely set of ancient-through-Middle-Ages history books called A Pictureseque Tale of Progress. It's a terrific set to have on hand for your Ancients study, as it has about half a volume of stuff on ancient Sumeria and Assyria, and well over a hundred pages on the Mongols, and plenty of other stuff on those topics that always seem SO difficult to find good, kid-friendly resources for :)
  4. But don't you see, that makes it WORSE - Foersters is supposed to be really good for engineers, and she wants to be an engineer, so if we go with Foersters I have to find another geometry! And what if she likes THAT series better and we have to change again? And what if all this changing makes her forget everything? :lol: I think I better just go drink the rest of my Friday night glass of wine!!!
  5. I just want to say, I'm SO FREAKIN' GLAD that I'm not the only one who does this - I've driving my husband NUTS going back and forth and back and forth!! :lol: And just to muddy the waters - am I the only one who looks ahead to the next few years to decide on this stuff? Every time I think about making a change, I start calculating like this - "OK, if I finish AoPS Pre-A this year, then I can spend the next two years on AoPS Algebra if we have to (I am VERY concerned that she be absolutely rock-solid on algebra), then stick with AoPS for the rest of the sequence in high school. BUT if I switch to Dolciani Algebra this semester, I won't finish it this school year. So then do I finish Dolciani in the fall? Or switch to Foerster's to give her a full year? Then what do I do the NEXT year? Dolciani Geometry or Foersters? Does Foersters HAVE a geometry? Maybe I SHOULD look at Lial's..." My poor poor husband has to listen to this stuff by the HOUR sometimes... I think part of the problem too is, I want her to not just understand the theory, but also have 'automatic' recall of the procedures. My DS in K understands the THEORY of multiplication pretty well - you add groups of the same number over and over. But it's not like he knows his times tables or anything!!! Eventually I want him to know both the underlying ideas AND the times tables! And it's the same for DD - I want her to understand the ideas behind math, and ALSO to be able to perform the skills without having to reinvent the wheel from those underlying theories each time. That's where *I* have issues! Up until this year, we just did Saxon, which worked SO well for teaching skill performance. I understand the theory that solving a few really hard problems with do more to cement the ideas than solving 30 rote practice problems, but those rote practice problems are really super for solidifying those skills until you can do it in your sleep! If I could figure out a way to meld AoPS and Saxon I think I would! :lol:
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