Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

LaughingCat

Members
  • Content Count

    1,392
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2,092 Excellent

About LaughingCat

  • Rank
    Chief Cat Herder

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Contact Methods

  • Location
    On top of the world

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I think which dry shampoo works depends on hair type. I have thick fine hair and the first (expensive) brands I tried were a total bust -- but the cheapo brands I've tried work well (Suave and some other one I can't remember).
  2. Not mumto2 but I love the walking stick -- it doesn't feel creepy to me at all (although... I should LISTEN to the books and see if I maintain that view 😄 ) spoiler in whilte: I was soooo sad when she ended the walking stick! I guess it says something about the author when you end up mourning a mostly inanimate object For Psy-Changlings -- must admit I do not love this series. I like it enough to have read a bunch of them though. But... reading the next one --to me - not near the latest (Tangle of Need), and I just feel mostly 'eh' so far. Not sure what it is though that i don't care for (and its not just this one either, was feeling that way through the last couple I've read)
  3. Finished Wild Country by Anne Bishop I have to say -- I put this on hold in all available forms at the library (this is my current habit for any book i strongly desire to read) , and what showed up first was the Audio version. This is the first time that has happened for a fiction book (it has happened a lot for non-fiction books though). And it this case I feel like listening instead of reading affected my enjoyment of the book. It seems to me that my rating of the book was affected by 1) not being able to go back easily to revisit what just happened and 2) I had just finished listening to the 'Sweep" books by Ilona Andrews. The style of writing and the narrator is SOO different between these books. I found the Ilona Andrews books far more enjoyable to listen to I must admit -- and I think that affected my enjoyment of Wild Country. And one thing that was definitely missing was that feeling of getting lost in the book that I usually get while reading -- I will have to reread the book when the print version arrives and see if that makes a difference.
  4. Read Among Others by Jo Walton, which was compared to The Goblin Emperor in one of Tor's links this month (https://www.tor.com/2019/02/27/how-jo-waltons-among-others-and-katherine-addisons-the-goblin-emperor-tell-stories-of-trauma-and-recovery/) -- Don't really agree with Ms Schnelbach 🙂 Among Others does have a LOT of references to old sci fi books many of which I read in my own teenage years (70's ish - -not the super old stuff), which is about the only thing that kept me going in the book. Otherwise it felt quite slow and I didn't care for the end, whereas I LOvED the Goblin Emperor. Finished listening to Clean Sweep (ilona Andrews) -- I've been listening to more audio books lately and it's funny how some of them I do not like to listen to at all even though I love the book -- this one was very enjoyable though and I"ve started into Sweep in Peace now.
  5. Blowing through The Others series this week, currently on #4 "Marked in Flesh". It's funny that I am enjoying them so much because every time the first book, Written in Red, came up on my radar the last few years, I would read the blurb and think "meh" It was only when the series was talked up here recently that I finally decided to give it a try anyway 👍 So thanks to BAW for once again giving me more enjoyable books to read 😄
  6. I really liked The Gate of Ivory a lot -- but the other 2 were quite different. One was more of a mystery style as I remember.
  7. Yes, the loss of contact definitely makes the book more about his skills/wits vs. the environment. I did not get that feeling at all from the movie once he made contact. Regarding my complaint about it going too perfectly, I did think that feeling may have come somewhat because everything just had to fall together so perfectly for him to be rescued at all -- yet the only 'mistake' I really remember him making was when he lost contact with Earth. Maybe if I reread it in the future that part would not seem to stand out so much to me (i.e. could be the comparison to the movie where he had the advice of all earth could offer him). And you are right -- there is a lot of humor -- I should have counted that toward emotion. And definitely could be considered a coping mechanism in a hard situation too.
  8. Finished The Martian today so posting some thoughts since Karini asked for them 😄 This book really reminded me of George O Smith's Venus Equilateral with all the tech talk -- it is a style of book I haven't read in a long while (which may be because I don't read near as much SF as I used too?). I really liked Venus Equilateral for a long time (and reread it multiple times) even though I read it long after its tech was outdated. I might have to dig it out to see if I still like it. Unfortunately, I think The Martian does not have quite as much story outside the technical aspects, and so will probably not age very well. One downside to The Martian IMO was the Mary Sue/Gary Stu (or perhaps Angus McGyver in this case 🤣 ) feel -although he did make mistakes, there was still a feel of things going too well -it seemed like he fixed almost every problem he encountered the first time with his first idea kind of thing. Perhaps it was the way it was written, as I can think of multiple instances in the book where he didn't ended up going with his first idea - -but at the same time I can't think of any times where the idea he decided to go with didn't work the first time -- there was very little feel of him "let me try this idea out and then see where it needs improvement" and much more of "I know this will work" and voilà it does. One big diff to the movie that I really liked was the end -- which I will put white just in case anyone here doesn't already know how it ends.. the movie ending with the ships captain stepping in and taking over and him implementing his crazy idea of moving himself with his air supply and then the epilogue showing all the people and where they ended up the book ending where everyone did the job they were TRAINED to do I must say I really liked the book ending much better there. Beyond that, the movie seemed to be very true to the book (there was one other big scene left out that I can think of... where he flipped over as driving... but to me that seemed just one more instance of his perfect McGyvering skills rather than adding to the tension). The one really big difference was how much he did on his own vs. with help from NASA, where the book was def. more towards the "McGyver/on your own with only your own wits" and the movie was much more towards "kitty down a hole/rescue of a man in a precarious situation". Another thought --there was not much emotion portrayed in the book. OTOH I have read other "Man on his own trying to survive the wilderness" books that have the same feel -- so that could be more about portraying the idea that in such a situation you would be so focused on the "next step" needed to survive the day that you would be left with little mental energy left over to angst about your situation (although in this case, if so, he does little to portray that feeling either other than the lack of emotion -- I really brought that thought over from the other books). I know I read this way after most others -- I'd love to hear others thoughts on this book after having had some time pass ....
  9. I'm reading The Martian right now -- started it after DH and I watched the movie Friday night. Wrong order I know but I wasn't planning to watch or read it at all 😄 So far (I am maybe 1/3) the movie appears to have been very true to the book -- except in that you don't find out how he was left behind until later in the book but it is the start in the movie (this section of the book was a bit jarring to me in the way it started -- couldn't figure out what was going on at first). Also so far the book is losing to the movie --opposite of my normal reaction.
  10. I don't see an actual 'movie' -- in fact I have trouble when I try to see something clearly in my head. At the same time, I definitely end up "in" the story and have a clear idea of what a movie version 'should' look like. Not so much the actual people/scenery (unless clearly wrong -- such as the tall/short example someone gave), more towards the 'feeling' of the person/scenery but still a definite opinion. Along these lines, I would have said I read every word -- but when I started reading aloud to my children -- I found that really I skimmed any 'boring' parts without really realizing it 😄 (skimmed might not be quite the right word -- I don't do what I would do if I were skimming a text or even skimming a fiction book looking for a specific section where I skip MOST parts-- this is more towards speed reading )
  11. I (and my siblings) am adopted -- but I expect that 90% or more of my social circle do not know that. It is not generally something that comes up in conversation unless adoption is being discussed for other reasons.
  12. I believe for most people the answer really has to do with whether they believe the person is truly sorry and changed (and sadly that doesn't normally seem to have much to do with the person's actual repentance). And there is extremely little leeway given for past societal standards -- most people hold people to the standards of today for acts they committed 30 or more years ago (myself included).
  13. This, like many things, was no doubt different from area to area. I am old enough to be part of the timeframe we are talking here -- and I was purposefully exposed to Mumps -- my brother had it and my Mom told MANY times how she had us play together the whole time he was sick hoping I would also get it but I failed to do so ( I was 2 years old at the time), and later when I was the first on my street to get Chicken Pox neighbor kids were purposefully exposed to me (although nothing like a "chicken pox party' thing -- just no isolation --so all my friends also ended up with chicken pox of course).. I also remember lining up at school for vaccinations -- pretty much ALL kids got the vaccinations -- through high school (although it is certainly possible that parent approval was required, that is not part of my memory). It was clearly different mindset as to whether you would WANT to be vaccinated back when these diseases were more prevalent though..
  14. Read Breakdown by Katherine Amt Hanna on the recommendation of my DH -- who mostly reads only a couple dystopian books per year, which is NOT my favorite genre by a long shot. After I grilled him quite a bit to find out if I was going to have any negative surprises, I quite enjoyed it. It was a gentle dystopian romance if you can imagine such a thing. Also read Trail of Lightning which I enjoyed. It's interesting to me that many fantasy novelists lately have a dystopian type background -- which does not bother me at ALL vs actual dystopian novel. I suppose have read too many dystopian novels with relatively random deaths of primary characters, or sometimes not so random deaths of almost all characters or a sad depressing outcome or all of the above (I'm looking at you, On the Beach). Might have to put Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrel on my list to retry with all the love it is getting here lately. I tried it once a while back but didn't get past the 1st chapter. ETA: I was going to say my reading has been anti-cozy this week so far-- but actually Breakdown was fairly cozy considering my expectation of it was anti-cozy 😄
  15. Yes, but if I don't completely hate it, I will often jump randomly ahead and read a bit here and there to see if it is just a boring start -- and fairly often the later part will draw me in enough that I go back and read the whole thing.
×
×
  • Create New...