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NittanyJen

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NittanyJen last won the day on August 3 2013

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About NittanyJen

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    http://hillandalefarmschool.blogspot.com/

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  1. You mean like older DS, who for a year told the stunning knock-knock joke: KNOCK KNOCK??? Who's there? CATCH!! Catch-who? I CATCHING YOU HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! Or younger DS, with the auditory issues, who for years gave us gems such as the great emancipator "Hammerman Minkin," slept in his "Jomamas," and fell down when he twisted his "foot-waist." (ankle). His best was his 2-year insistence that we the impaired parents QUIT insisting that 1 + 1 equaled 2 when he could CLEARLY see that it was obviously 11. These days he deals much better with the auditory stuff (with the help of reading the words) and his math is better . . . but the stubborn is in mint condition. Oh, and btw, I finally got where that knock knock joke was supposed to just last year, 11 years later! In my defense I was too distracted by the hysterical giggles bubbling out of the boy, and trying to stem my own from the nonsensical answer-- except of course, he wasn't as far off as I thought!! LOL!! ka-choo! So I guess the yolk's on me.
  2. Okay, so a couple of years ago, my youngest decided he needed to be sodium for Halloween. This year? Yes, he wants to be a tornado. Just ONE year, can't he be a ghost or a mummy??? At least last year wasn't too bad . . . he was King Arthur (and older brother was the black knight) from Monty Python . . . I can still hear clacking coconut shells . . .
  3. So sorry you have to go through this in exchange for providing such an amazing service for homeschoolers everywhere :(
  4. Oh no, that means we probably lose the photo of my brother-in-law in his kilt with the chainsaw! (perfect photo for "this thread is kilt" I only bring out the one of him wiping out on a snowboard in his kilt if the thread really, seriously needs to be kilt) :D. Ah well, it's worth the sacrifice if it keeps SWB and my forum-mates free of difficulties! It can always stealth-reappear later :) Figuring out the famous from the only infamous right now seems like it's more trouble than it's worth! Better safe than sorry and this sounds like it is one headache of a project :P
  5. FYI, all of my "kilt" posts are of my brother-in-law and are a-okay :). Well, in terms of copyright, anyway :) But good heavens . . . though I'm pretty sure I never posted more than 5% of anything anybody wrote, or unattributed. If I come across anything that could be dicey, I'll kill it.
  6. DS10: I love the smell of vanilla. It smells like good memories. Maybe that isn't a genius thing to say, but I just loved it :)
  7. Hi Jade, Sorry it took me so long to get back to you-- I have been assembling a chemistry co-op class for the first time ==:O It has occupied a lot of my time. We have been really happy with Singapore DM for the integrated approach to algebra/geometry/trig-- happy enough that I did go ahead and locate copies of the going out of print levels 3 & 4, and not sure if they're going out of print Advanced Mathematics, which introduces more trig topics and begins early calculus. These books are the opposite of AoPS in terms of brevity. They are written to the student, though I choose to continue to work with my son, because he studies better that way. The workbook that accompanies these texts is actually not consumable-- there is not sufficient space inside to work in the workbook, and for this book as well as the text, the problems are to be copied into a separate notebook. The workbook supplies additional problems that continue to develop the thoughts from the text, and I do recommend them-- the problem sets in the texts are excellent, but brief. I have been using the workbooks for review a couple of months behind the text; again, that is how my son works best. Others might work better by working through all the problems at once and learning it more solidly in the first place. We often work together on a white board, or sometimes on the computer-- the textbook makes use of a program called Geometer's Sketchpad, for which you must purchase a subscription, but I have found the subscription worthwhile, as the program is very interesting to use and allows the student to develop geometric relationships as he goes before I present them to him formally, and he can see how the angles and lines and volumes and shapes all relate to one another in a dynamic way. Just as with the earlier, Primary Math series, sometimes the books require hands-on activities such as cutting out shapes from paper to develop an appreciation of relationships, and the exercises let the student try different things to get an excellent sense of why the relationships work the way that they do. I don't have experience with Jacobs, but for seeing different presentations of things, having a text that nicely facilitates discussion between teacher and student or alternatively allows a motivated student to work alone, and uses the integrated approach, I love Singapore DM series.
  8. Hmmm one of these posts made me wonder... When I took algebra 1, we were not allowed to use anything until we had proven it to our instructor. I wish I knew which text we used! So geometry was a piece of cake. Now it seems algebra is being presented with less reliance on proofs. Is this generally true?
  9. I think in the US we need to be careful about using our own frame of reference when thinking of what kids can or should do in math. The fact is, traditional math instruction here has been pretty poor-- it has moved at an intolerably slow pace for no good reason (really-- in the traditional sequence into the early 80's at least, kids were still working on arithmetic into the 8th grade; only the very cream of the crop got to try algebra by then, and the general math courses did not introduce much in the way of algebraic thinking). So of course to many kids, even good ones, algebra and geometry felt like "a jump" in cognitive skills and thinking. I think that is why Singapore Math and a few related programs feel so Earth-shattering to us (and is one reason why there is so much blow-back on the Common Core). Not only do these programs offer much better gradual buildup of numeric literacy and mathematical logic from the beginning than traditional US instruction typically did, but in the Asian classrooms, the methods of instruction were very different, as were the methods of teacher development. I just read a WSJ article from a Japanese teacher, describing how kids were encouraged to talk in class, interact with one another, and be generally noisy in math class, rather than sitting at their desks absorbing from the teacher, developing multiple strategies and helping each other find the problems in their solutions-- things people in the US are crying foul over as being developmentally inappropriate and not possible-- because our teachers have not received the critical support and training they need to see how this works, in order to be productive and instructive rather than chaotic. Apparently, kids really can do this stuff. Those of us who use Singapore's Primary Math series already know that teaching kids multiple strategies works wonderfully, as does introducing algebraic thinking and more advanced geometry earlier (though even in 7DM, I am seeing foundations for formal proofs rather than line by line actual proofs, though I could easily adapt the program to make it that way-- I don't because I see that step developed more in the Additional Math program that hits later on). I get that people had these experiences. I think we need to remember that our experiences were based upon our baseline educations, which even in good schools, was maybe not the most up to date model available to us today. It could be a mistake to hold our kids back because of what we experienced. I make an effort to teach the programs written, not the programs I recall-- yes, I tweak here and there, and I am in charge, not the book-- but if I change something, I try to make sure it is for sound reasons, and not because I'm being a stick in the mud. I need a better reason than, "WEll that's how I larned it, and I done did good!" I think that goes for both sides--whether we feel our background was lacking or superior. No matter who you are, there is probably something that could be learned.
  10. Another way to go might be to spend a year with AoPS Number Theory and Probability books in 8th, then hit geometry in 9th, you could still review algebra throughout the year to shore up any areas where she needs more confidence.
  11. I just get quizzed endlessly about homeschooling! Most people I meet are completely fascinated by it-- even the "socialization" questions I get at parties are mostly true curiosity and benign, with only about 1-2% actually being the hostile sort. Sometimes I kind of wish I could talk about something else LOL. My holiday bane is my annual Christmas Virus, which currently has me trapped upstairs in my room, trying not to give it to anybody else! I think that during the holidays, people think, "Well, I know I'm sick, but we only have this party once per year, I should go." No, you really shouldn't. Because then *I* catch your cold, no matter how much sanitizer or soap I use, an long after you have recovered, *I* end up freaking SICK for the holidays yet again. LOL there's my "bah, humbug" :D Just had to get that off my chest! Now if I could just get this ELEPHANT off my chest so I could breathe . . .
  12. I already posted this on FB, forgive me . . . DS10, at breakfast, out of the blue: You know, EVERYBODY talks about Caligula and Nero all the time! People should really think more about the Aztec priests!! (later, at dinner) DH: So, tell me about those Aztec priests! DS10, with a dour expression: Dad, you do NOT want to talk about Aztec priests during dinner, trust me.
  13. DS9: Mommy, look at this menu! They accidentally used an epsilon instead of an 'e'!
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