Jump to content

Menu

forty-two

Members
  • Posts

    2,646
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation

2,893 Excellent

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. WRT looking, I like a pp's suggestion of using a paper box lid to cover her hands/keyboard. Also, fwiw, I was a computer engineering major - so quite a bit of typing - and *I* look at the keys some when I type and it doesn't slow me down much (although I can do true touch typing when I need to, which it sounds like your dd can't); aka, in some cases I think effective typing can coexist with looking at keys, although it sounds like your dd doesn't feel like she can type effectively. WRT games and lack of progress, two thoughts. One, maybe she'd just as soon have a "boring" but effective program that doesn't try to be fun instead of a program that tries to be fun but fails. Two, what do the games have her do? I mean, is she practicing typing words and sentences, or do the games have her practicing random sequences of letters? AKA, does the practice the program have her do match what she would actually be typing IRL? Or not? (In TTRS, everything past Level 1 is practicing words and sentences, which I do think is very helpful.) WRT not wanting to take the time to do it daily, I do agree with pp that small chunks of daily practice would be a lot more effective than irregular chunks of larger practice. Even 5min daily would add up a lot over time, without taking up much time in your day. I am wondering if she doesn't need a program to *learn* how to type so much as she just needs lots and lots of practice to make what she has learned automatic. In which case, maybe daily typing dictation would do the job. Use that paper box top, cover her hands, and have her type from a book or a piece of paper or from your dictation for five minutes - whatever she can do in that time. And do it every day. If she knows where all the keys are and which finger to use when she thinks about it, then all she needs is sufficient practice at real-world typing till it gets automatic. (TTRS has "dictation" lessons every five modules or so, where you write from what you hear instead of what you see - so you have to be able to visualize what you are typing, just like how in regular dictation you have to visualize what you are handwriting. Just like dictation's harder than copywork for handwriting, it's probably harder in typing, too. So it might be worth practicing having her type from your dictation.) Also, how's her spelling? I know my middle dd hit her wall in typing when she hit words she had problems spelling. And a random thought: Does your dd have long nails? One thing I've noticed is that the longer my nails get, the harder it is for me to type - it feels like I'm not hitting the keys right or like I'm going to hit other keys - and as a result I look way more often and the whole process just feels uncomfortable. I'd been delaying trimming my nails, and really noticed the issues in typing yesterday; and today, after I trimmed them, I find I can type much, much better.
  2. My 10th grader wants to do the One Year Adventure Novel, but she's not really a video person. She'd just as soon do the textbook and workbook and such, but skip the videos. How much would she be missing if she didn't watch the videos?
  3. Responded in your other thread, but reposting because the discussion's here: We did Touch Type Read and Spell. It's pricey, even through HSBC, and it took the girls two years to get through (4th-5th for middle; 7th-8th for oldest) - they each restarted the program after hitting a wall - but it worked and they can type effectively. I don't know that it's fun, exactly, but it wasn't *un*fun - the girls never minded doing it except when they were having difficulties (which we solved by starting over). It is very simple - it's 24 levels with 30 modules per level (or something very close to that), each module taking about 5min or so. I had the girls do 3 modules a day, four days a week (and we continued over summer) - they could be new or repeats - and we continued on until we were done (a little over 1.5yrs for oldest, nearly 2yrs for middle). It focuses more on accuracy than speed, which I thought was good - no temptation to sacrifice accuracy to hit speed targets; in fact, there are only accuracy targets, no speed targets at all. (And my girls both freeze up very badly when timed for stuff like that.) I chose it because it's OG-based, and good for kids with dyslexia; I figured they could use the slow, steady approach to typing as well as another pass through spelling. Oldest dd hit a wall very early in the program - in Level 1 or 2 - something about typing was hard for her (not a surprise and why I went to the expensive big gun program first). But after a restart, something clicked and she, maybe not *sailed*, but plodded steadily through the rest of the program. Middle dd initially did better than oldest - she didn't run into difficulties until around module 5 or 6; it was rough going for a while because she refused to start over - insisted on trying to keep going even through it was driving her to tears - but she eventually listened to me and gave the restart a try, and she was successful from there on. (It took awhile for her to accept that the goal of the program is to learn to type, not merely finish the program - that she wasn't failing to start over, because there'd be no point to finishing if she still couldn't type at the end.) They both write on the computer frequently and effectively, so I'm pretty pleased. I reminded them frequently about looking at the screen and not the keyboard, but I didn't police it. ~*~ What kind of problems is she having? What does "not getting it" look like? And does she find the programs themselves hard, or the programs are easy enough but it just isn't transferring?
  4. We did Touch Type Read and Spell. It's pricey, even through HSBC, and it took the girls two years to get through (4th-5th for middle; 7th-8th for oldest) - they each restarted the program after hitting a wall - but it worked and they can type effectively. I don't know that it's fun, exactly, but it wasn't *un*fun - the girls never minded doing it except when they were having difficulties (which we solved by starting over). It is very simple - it's 24 levels with 30 modules per level (or something very close to that), each module taking about 5min or so. I had the girls do 3 modules a day, four days a week - they could be new or repeats - and we continued on until we were done (a little over 1.5yrs for oldest, nearly 2yrs for middle). It focuses more on accuracy than speed, which I thought was good - no temptation to sacrifice accuracy to hit speed targets; in fact, there are only accuracy targets, no speed targets at all. (And my girls both freeze up very badly when timed for stuff like that.) I chose it because it's OG-based, and good for kids with dyslexia; I figured they could use the slow, steady approach to typing as well as another pass through spelling. Oldest dd hit a wall very early in the program - in Level 1 or 2 - something about typing was hard for her (not a surprise and why I went to the expensive big gun program first). But after a restart, something clicked and she, maybe not *sailed*, but plodded steadily through the rest of the program. Middle dd initially did better than oldest - she didn't run into difficulties until around module 5 or 6; it was rough going for a while because she refused to start over - insisted on trying to keep going even through it was driving her to tears - but she eventually listened to me and gave the restart a try, and she was successful from there on. (It took awhile for her to accept that the goal of the program is to learn to type, not merely finish the program - that she wasn't failing to start over, because there'd be no point to finishing if she still couldn't type at the end.) They both write on the computer frequently and effectively, so I'm pretty pleased. I reminded them frequently about looking at the screen and not the keyboard, but I didn't police it. ~*~ What kind of problems is she having? What does "not getting it" look like? And does she find the programs themselves hard, or the programs are easy enough but it just isn't transferring?
  5. I wouldn't want to turn an 11yo loose on fanfic sites b/c of adult content, as a pp said. But wrt comments, you can moderate comments on Archive of Our Own (AO3) - if you set up the account (use your own email and not share the password with him), you could turn on comment moderation and spike anything bad before he could see it. I think you can moderate comments on fanfiction.net (ff.n) as well. (Those are the two sites I am on.) Both my girls write fanfic, and I've toyed with asking if they want to post some online - I've shared curated fanfic with them, but I haven't turned them loose to find their own stuff. Even with ratings and such, plenty of 18-22yos aren't very good at it - I've seen plenty of rated-PG stuff that had super intense violent situations.
  6. We all love the Harry Potter audiobooks here - Jim Dale does such a good job. There's a few interpretive choices he makes that I don't entirely agree with, but it doesn't take me out of the story, and he gets so much just spot on. Most of the audiobooks I've listened to are kids' books. IDK if I'm not a discerning audiobook listener or if I've just been lucky enough to have always gotten good readers, but I've never listened to one that took me out of the story. Most of them were classic books or really popular books - ones where the publisher would go to the effort of getting a really good reader. (Or readers, in the case of dramatized ones.) In addition to Jim Dale, I especially enjoyed Ramon de Ocampo's narrating of Brandon Sanderson's Alcatraz books. Usually I prefer to read instead of listen, but he was *so good* that I think he improved the already good books with his reading. He *is* the voice of Alcatraz for me.
  7. Not a lot - like others, we mostly have all the things already ;). Got a new planner for middle and oldest, and a new wall calendar for me. Need to get new Expo markers, because we go through ours ridiculously fast <sigh>. I got a paperwhite last Black Friday, and I love it. While I don't mind reading on my tablet, I wanted to use it less - less staring at a backlit screen, less distraction from the internet. And it has worked out really well - three-quarters of what I read can go easily on the Kindle, and it's easier on both my eyes and hands (tablet got heavy after a while). And it fits well in my purse, much less obtrusive than the tablet - it's easy to take with me. Now I just use the tablet for pdfs. (In theory you can have Amazon convert pdfs to kindle files; for simple files it works well, but if the file has boxes or pull-out quotes or footnotes or such, it doesn't convert well, or didn't when I last tried several years ago.) I don't use it for school, though, because most of my school files are pdfs and display nicer on the tablet. Kids do read school-related ebooks on our old kindles, though.
  8. We don't have TV either. We used to get a month of YouTube TV during the Olympics; it was pretty nice - we could stream live TV and also watch replays - but it was just too expensive this year ($62 or something like that). So we are trying the $10 no-ads subscription to Peacock TV, NBC's streaming service, which has its pros and cons, but the price is definitely right ;). The main con is that there seems to be no way to actually stream the broadcast TV feeds - I managed to stream one once, but haven't been able to again. A related con is that I find it extremely unintuitive to navigate - what it wants me to watch (streaming highlights and interviews and background info) and what I want to watch (actual events) are not at all the same thing, and it's hard to tell whether what I want isn't offered or is just buried somewhere and I can't find it. Certainly, the PeacockTV's station offerings do *not* match what those stations are actually broadcasting. But, despite those cons, there is a big pro (aside from the price), and that is their replay offerings. They are embargoed, so that you have to wait a day before they are put up, but they are very nice. They show the whole event, some with "station breaks" where ads would have been, but some with no breaks at all. And minus the synchronized diving final and the opening ceremonies, very few breaks - not more than every 30min. So we don't get to see *all* the things, but we do get to see quite a few things - and we can do so at whatever time is convenient. It's not perfect (and I'm still unthrilled that it won't let us stream live broadcasts) but has definitely been worth the $10. ETA: PeacockTV and/or NBC online has a free option, that gives you a 30min "temporary pass" to livestreams. IDK if there's a daily/monthly limit or anything, but it does get mad about ad-blockers.
  9. On the one hand, it's too much of a hypothetical to have any real idea. But playing around with the thought a bit, IDK, I'd think I'd be open to remarrying, but unlikely to actually make a real effort at dating. I like being married, but I like my own company, too - and I definitely don't like the whole "meeting people" process. But if a good man fell into my lap (the way dh did), I think I'd seriously consider it, at least.
  10. A few thoughts: *My rec for most immediate thing to do next would be to finish out elementary SM with 6A/B. You both enjoy SM, it's going well - there's no reason *not* to do 6A/B. *And while you are doing that, you can start thinking about where you want to go for alg/geo/etc. 6A/B probably won't take a whole year - I think middle dd finished it before Feb - and then you can start either the Pre-Alg or Alg book in whatever sequence you've picked out. *WRT AoPS, I'd be hesitant about doing it with a student who doesn't have a passion for math (unless they've been really bored with other math programs), because it's pretty intense and if your student doesn't have a passion for math, they might not want to put that kind of time and effort into the subject. But it's not too expensive to try just to see. (I tried with my oldest and it definitely *wasn't* a good fit, but I don't regret trying.) Also, if you try AoPS, I'd definitely rec start with Pre-Alg, not Alg.
  11. I was wondering that, too. My oldest is on track to have four piano courses in high school, but she didn't start playing in high school. She was at late intermediate/early advanced for her "first" high school course, so I wouldn't want to name it "basics", kwim - it gives a false impression of what she was doing. I'd only want to use "Beginner Piano Basics" if it was in fact her first year playing at all. Could you get away with something like Piano Literature 1: <major composers/time period studied> Piano Literature 2: <major composers/time period studied>, etc.? e.g. Piano Literature 1: Bach, Beethoven, Mozart Piano Literature 2: Debussy, Rachmaninoff It would be easy enough to strip out the numbers, too, so that it's just Piano Literature: Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Piano Literature: Debussy, Rachmaninoff - but I agree with pp that it would be really nice to show progression. I mean, in some ways the composers can imply a progression, but it's nice to make things explicit. ~*~ IDK if this is a good idea, but for dd I was thinking of including a list of major pieces played in each year (comparable to a list of major works studied in lit), which in your shoes would be another way to show progression.
  12. IDk how long it is in general, but a classmate of my niece had/has it and she was in the hospital for several months.
  13. I think difficulties in spelling and difficulties in writing cursive can go together. I've read that effectively writing in cursive requires a person to be able to spell by syllables instead of spell by letter, and that's certainly been true in our experience. And dyslexics are less likely to naturally develop those skills. For us, difficulty in cursive uncovered some weaknesses that also affected reading and spelling. And so I ended up teaching cursive in a way that helped remediate those weaknesses (which was way more intense than the usual approach). Our cursive program, Smithhand, taught by strokes, so after learning a given stroke and the letters which that stroke made possible, instead of moving to words (as the program did), I had us then learn all the phonograms those letters made possible. Once we'd learned all the letters and phonograms, I moved to spelling our way through the phonics book, 2,000 one-syllables words, having the kids orally break each word down into its individual sounds and then write it in cursive. (These words mostly all used the top spelling for a given sound, so they could just work on their sound-spelling correspondence and not have to get into figuring out or remembering which phonogram to use for a given sound; if there was any question, I told them.) After that, we moved to simple studied dictation in cursive (using Spelling-You-See in direct defiance of its instructions to use print, lol), while also working on learning to break words into syllables and combine syllables into words, and to spell by syllable (using Rewards Reading, also done in cursive). After all that, they could read and write cursive fairly well, and also had a big bump in reading and spelling ability. I'd recommend giving your ds the Barton student pre-screening(it's free and pretty quick). Barton is a reading program targeted for dyslexics, but the pre-screening is looking to see if a student has the necessary underlying skills to learn phonics. (My oldest failed it as a fluent reader - she was largely reading by sight, not by phonics.) Amongst other things, it tests for the ability to divide oral words into syllables - if he can't do that (my kids couldn't), he's going to find both spelling and writing in cursive very hard.
  14. True - I was assuming she didn't care about spoilers, but if you do care, OP, that's something to watch out for - there are lots to go around in the later movies. In that case, might as well start with the Phase 1 movies (Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, etc.).
×
×
  • Create New...