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TheAutumnOak

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Posts posted by TheAutumnOak

  1. My husband is pretty much this way, in all areas of homeschooling and homemaking and I love it!...I choose the curricula we use, the furniture in the house, the supplies and whatever we need for the home...My husband feels like I am the one in the house all day, so I should put in it what I want to - he doesn't care...I know some husbands who need to be involved in every decision, from drapes in the livingroom to the books the kids read...I would never want that...I love the freedom of not having to come to an agreement with him on every single aspect of our lives together...On the flip side, he likes to choose the cars and what happens to the outside of the house...I don't care about those things at all, so we get along just fine :-)

     

    If I were to ask for his help, I am sure he would give it, but I am glad that he is not controlling or overly involved...

    • Like 2
  2. I am currently using MP with my boys...I use to school using WTM suggestions, but slowly switched over to MP...We are now using all MP...Here is what I think after having experience with both...

     

    It really depends on what you prefer and what you want...Don't switch just for the lesson plans - unless you are the type that hates planning and really needs plans, you will probably be disappointed...I have the plans and use them, but not as written...We school 4 days a week, and my oldest is doing a mix of different grades for his 9th grade year, so I have to modify the plans to suit our needs...Personally, I like having the plans and being able to modify them - I don't want to plan everything from scratch and at the same time I don't want to feel like I am a slave to someone else's schedule and plans...That being said, if you want lesson plans you can follow without tweaking, that probably will not happen...

     

    I chose to use MP because I feel the teacher's guides and info in the lesson plans have made me a better teacher...I have a plan of what to accomplish and help accomplishing it, which is what I wanted, especially as I move into the older grades...When I first attempted MP, I did not understand it; I saw it as workbooks to hand over to my children and then correct...Once I really read over the materials, asked questions, and learned how the materials should be used, I started to really appreciate them...

     

    To try and answer your original questions, I do think it is much less time trying to coordinate planning, but I don't think it is less time excecuting the plan, at least at the 3rd grade level unless you use the new plan...The 3rd grade level was always the most difficult one to do with MP...

     

    We school in about the same time as before because I combine my boys...That is my next point...It is difficult to do many MP cores at once and stay on top of them all without having a long day...If you don't want a long day, try combining for some subjects...If your kids did not start with MP, it is probably best to combine some things anyway...

     

    All in all, it depends on what you want...I like MP's take on a classical education, and love the guides they provide so I use their curriculum...If you prefer the WTM's take on classical, and you are doing well with it, then it might not make sense to switch...My advice is to buy a subject that MP created (a literature lesson guide is a good choice) and see how you like it...It will give you more info about MP and help you to make a better decision for next year...If you are not using their Latin (or if you are not using Latin at all) that is another good place to start...

     

    I hope this helps...

    • Like 3
  3. Have you looked at Latina Christiana or First Form Latin from Memoria Press? We're using Latina Christiana this year, and so far I'm really pleased. Latina Christiana is often used for 3-5th graders, while First Form is an introductory course that could be used with older children. If you don't have a Latin background, I recommend purchasing the instructional DVD. I have no Latin background and am using the DVD for Latina Christiana. It's very thorough and engaging for my daughter. 

     

    Good luck finding what works for you!

     

    I agree with this...We are currently using Latina Christiana and First Form Latin at my house...My oldest used Latina last year...The DVDs are a big help, the book is simple and streamlined, without cluttered pages or unnecessary graphics...I like the way it looks and I like the way it teaches :)

    • Like 2
  4. And, now I'm going to ask too. The one time I paid a pretty big fine here (close to $20?) I just smiled and told the clerk I'd just see it as a donation to support the library, and the clerk didn't correct me, but the clerk might not know where the money goes either.

     

    ETA: looked through library website, ended up reading the budget, and since the library (in the revenue section) is budgeting $330,000 in fines for 2015, I'm going to conclude that yes, fines go to the library.

     

    :huh: Man, you better have the best library in the country with all of those fines!...I didn't realize people paid out so much money in fines...

    • Like 1
  5. Yes, I have taken breaks due to fines...I am not crazy about the selection at our library, when I take the kids they want to bring home stuff I would rather leave there, and it can be difficult to manage the holds because I reserve the books I want to check out...

     

    I am currently using the library now only to get specific books I need (I go alone), or to borrow a movie if I do not want to wait for Netflix to send it to me...

     

    Our library really does not have a good selection of books in my opinion, but they do have some things...

  6. But why should she involve the OP?

     

    If she and her sister are close enough that she knows about her nieces' and nephews' learning differences, she could ask her sister about her homeschool.

     

    If she needs to know why the children seem to be behind, she could ask her sister.

     

    That would be the way to gather information. The OP doesn't even know the family.

     

     

    I think the person wants to involve the OP to have someone who agrees and backs up her claims since she doesn't have any children...People usually like to have more than one person saying what they are, sort of like doubling up on someone...It would be easier for the person to ignore her sister, but having a third party's input is more compelling...

     

    Never get involved as a third party to anything you don't know about for sure...The first to present a case always appears right until a second person comes and challenges him...

    • Like 2
  7. Food, clothing, and medical isn't quite as subjective a need as education. Or, rather, I should say that the way to obtain it, give it, and what it should like isn't as relative.

    Would I butt in if a parent were only feeing their child McDonald's every day? No, because she is feeding them and WHAT a child is fed IS relative.

    Would I butt in if I saw a child in public school failing and obviously behind? No, because the child is receiving an education, even if it isn't up to my standards or the way I would do it.

    It's easy to determine if a parent isn't giving a child food or medical care; it's just more tangible. Education is different, imo; there are a million-ten different ways to "give" an education, many less obvious than others.

    This...The problem with this entire situation is the assessment being used...Terms like "educational neglect" differ wildly depending on who you talk to, and their standards of what an education should entail...The food example above is a good one...We would not "step in" because we disagreed with someone's choice of diet for her child, but we get to "step in" based on our opinions of what an education should look like...

     

    There are plenty of people being truly neglected by their parents...I grew up in the ghetto were real neglect was rampant...I can't even imagine someone contacting anyone in social services due to children being behind peers in matters of education...

     

    Parents do all kinds of things that I don't agree with, from schooling, clothing and food choices to discipline or the lack there of issues...No one would consider stepping in on those issues, but when it comes to matters involving home education, people somehow feel entitled to assess people based on their standards, and actually try to do something about it...

     

    As much as we would like to sometimes, we can't parent other people's children...Life is about more than learning what your peers are learning at the same time they are learning it...Not doing that does not equal neglect...Might make things harder for the child down the road, but so do so many other parenting choices that people don't bat an eye at...

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  8. My oldest is in 9th grade now and we are not outsourcing anything at this point, so I voted "0"...The only classes I am considering outsourcing at this point would be science in his 11th and 12th grade year to fulfill the lab requirement...I really don't want to outsource anything, so we will see...If we need to we will, and if we don't we won't...

     

    It is also encouraging to me to read about families who made it all the way through without outsourcing, though that seems more and more rare today...

    • Like 1
  9. I would borrow a book from a close friend or lend a book to a close friend, but I prefer to buy my homeschool materials...I like books in very good condition, and have a hard time buying used books and curricula unless I know it is in excellent condition...I make exceptions to this rule for old or out of print books; those I would buy second hand in less than great condition...

     

    I want the freedom to use my homeschool stuff as I please without the worry of returning it to someone...I also would not want to lend out what I plan to use again...I would gladly give away what I don't need anymore, but prefer to hold onto what I still need...

     

    Only under extreme circumstances involving close family or best friends would I lend what I cannot afford to give away...So no lending or borrowing of homeschool materials for me...I keep it or give it away...

  10. Sure. Let's take a look at A Beka. God used the Trail of Tears to bring many Indians to Christ.

     

    That is not Christian. That is taking unnecessary pain and death of many people, slapping a feel good outcome on it, and calling it reasonable. What happened with the Trail of Tears is NOT reasonable. That's not even an okay interpretation of God's works, nor is it backed by fact - which is what history should be based on. I have half a dozen samples of various history guides on my computer and as soon as I see how they treat Christopher Columbus, I archive it. Look at Sonlight's core 100 and the treatment of slavery, that it was not cruel. Um, no.

     

     

    I think it is insulting to Christians to throw together a series of events, add a band-aid of God's favor (because God must be favoring SOME people over another), and say this is what you must believe happened. Like Christians can't think for themselves? They can't apply what they know about God or see the good within the bad - the nuggets that make the world better? They can't study how a person used their faith to get through trying times to make a difference, but at the same time can't show how an atheist or non-Christian lived without talking down about them? They cannot look at how religion in the hands of the wrong people twisted God's word?

     

    That is what I have an issue with - the idea that Christians are too stupid to read history as it is written, as close to how it happened as possible, without having someone else rewrite it and add their idea of God's intentions for them. Too often it changes events, and writers will omit details they don't like.

     

     

    We use narrative history for the beginning stages, and switch to mostly primary sources by middle school: Letters of Note, Jackdaws, Read Like A Historian...and only secondary sources when necessary. Even then, highlighting bias words in the texts is a regular occurrence here so that we see where the author is coming from.

    I agree...It wasn't until I started homeschooling that I realized that there are people who actually believe and teach that things like slavery and The Trail of Tears wasn't all bad because people were introduced to Christ, or whatever version of Christianity that was being taught at the time...I totally agree that these are not Christian point of views...Sorry if you believe that and I am offending you, but I still say they are not Christian point of views...

     

    I don't recall coming across anything like that in SOTW...I don't have years 3 and 4 yet though...

  11. We have church school from September to May at our Parish...It starts at 9:00 (we have liturgy at 10)...One huge difference I see is that the class is not during service like when I was protestant...

     

    I don't know much about the program though...We are new to this parish (starting attending after Pascha), so my boys will start going to church school in September...

  12. We do not have TV so I cannot really speak knowledgeably of this, but a book I read by a teacher at an inner city LA school said he got good results teaching Lit ideas and understanding by first using TV and pointing out things like introduction, foreshadowing, structure, characterization, plot, protagonist, antagonist, pace, crisis, denoument, etc. types of literary elements and techniques that could be found for free in common TV shows and movies and that did not result in feelings of being overwhelmed with difficult reading or ideas at the same time as those different elements and beginnings into analysis were being done.

    We don't have a tv either :-)

  13. I also have a child who struggles quite a bit, doesn't read on grade level, and we have used the Memoria Press lit guides as well. However, it was suggested to us to go back a few grade levels for him (he was 15 last year) because the guides are challenging even at a lower level. It has worked well for him and he doesn't know or care what level it was originally suggested for.

    This is true...My upcoming 9th grader is also doing MP lit guides below grade level...

    • Like 1
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