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Homeschool Mom in AZ

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Homeschool Mom in AZ last won the day on April 16 2014

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About Homeschool Mom in AZ

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    Hive Mind Royal Larvae

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    NC

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  • Biography
    I began homeschooling in 2000 when my oldest was 4. I have 3 daughters.
  • Location
    NC
  • Interests
    quilting and writing

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  1. Yes, using the affectionate teasing that's done to build camaraderie in direct response to the minority saying something like, "You won't believe what someone said to me about Asians....." Then it's customary to respond with mocking the clueless person who made the racists statement by pretending to be them and saying something similar to them, usually in a voice that indicates they're stupid. You're getting that mocking is directed at the clueless person, not the minority right? The joking is happening between the minority friend and white friend.
  2. This would be in the context of a minority starting a conversation about someone saying something racially clueless, then people mimicking and mocking being clueless to demonstrate just how clueless it is. Carlos Mencia made a whole career out of it. His Wetback Mountain, a parody of Brokeback Mountain, with he and Mario Lopez is some of the funniest comedy I've ever seen. It's exactly the kind of humor my minority friends and the rest of us participated in as an act of sympathetic support. We could riff on that kind of thing all day. I guess I really do have a distorted view of how diverse America is for most people.
  3. Reading through this thread makes we wonder if the people who say they were unaware of how offensive blackface is has more to do with their own subculture than the culture at large? I wasn't around many African Americans, but I was around a large number of Latinos, some Asians, and a handful to Native Americans. Just being friends with these groups might be enough to make people aware without their parents, teachers, and religious leaders explicitly addressing these issues. For those of you unaware, did you not have minority friends who joked with other minorities around you about the bone headed comments usually older generations make about them? Anyone else remember the scene from Big Bang Theory where Sheldon's mom asks Raj (an astrophysicist from India) if, "Chicken is one of those animals your people think is magical?" It's a demonstration that you can be offensive in how you pose a question full of assumptions (in this case that he's superstitious and uneducated) while telling yourself you're just trying to nice by not serving food that's forbidden to him, when you should just ask it without assumptions the way you ask everyone else, "Do you have any dietary restrictions I should be aware of?" Did none of you joke around with minority friends about stereotypes? Something like, "Whaaat? You don't have chickens roaming around your front yard and you don't play the maracas?" Or something like, "Soooo to get to your house I go to the trading post, exchange some cash for wampum, get a feathered headdress, and ride my Apaloosa bareback to your tee pee, right?" "You should try to look more Asian...maybe a Hello Kitty backpack, some headphones...." Now that there's been mass media for a couple of generations and more recently the internet, both very effective at spreading mainstream American values, it's really hard for me to think that people can't be expected to have picked up on how fed up most of America and is with this kind of behavior. Trudeau wasn't a tween or teen when he did this, he surely would've been exposed to modern attitudes about this. Remember when Price Harry dressed up as a Nazi for Halloween? Does he not know there are Neo-Nazis around the world? And he had a relative who was a Nazi sympathizer. Did he really want to associate himself with them through imagery? I think he was teen at the time, but was no one able to say to him, "Uh Dude, you need to think about this a little deeper. You might not like the blow back you're going to get." Does Trudeau really want to associate himself through imagery with people who mock African Americans as stupid monkeys? That's where blackface came from and there are currently white supremacists in the world who mock them this and other ways.
  4. 46 from PHX. I've always known it was cringe worthy. I've never seen anyone do it in real life. I'm not sure how I knew this. I can't think of any sitcom shows I saw that addressed it, but I do have vague memories of an old film of someone dressed up in black face acting like an idiot, so maybe it's that. I think it's important to remember how little control a person has over the interpretation of an image. You can easily have one intention, but based on the observer's past experiences and associations, the message received can be completely different than the one intended. Choosing an image with a high likelihood of negative associations (African Americans have dealt with some of the most severely negative things: systemic injustice, slavery, discrimination, awful negative stereotypes, etc.) is incredibly risky and demonstrates very poor judgement on the part of the person putting on blackface. I would never want to be associated with real people who do mock African Americans that way, so dressing as one, even a beloved one, seems to me to be inviting trouble for no good reason.
  5. A Girl Named Zippy by Haven Kimmelhttps://www.amazon.com/Girl-Named-Zippy-Haven-Kimmel/dp/0767915054/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=zippy&qid=1568816586&sr=8-1
  6. On Wednesday the landscaper is coming to scalp our lawn and put down Dutch white clover and fescue grass. Some gardeners plant clover because it's a nitrogen fixer and rabbits love it, so it can be used as a decoy. My 1/4 acre orchard/permaculture food forest is going in behind the fence and the rest of the property (another acre) is getting clover and fescue. They can eat all they want and if the predators get them while they feast on it I'll just sing The Circle of Life to myself. Yes, I know clover can spread, but the idea is to give them easy access to something they like so they're less motivated to try and cross a barrier.
  7. I really liked that tree too, or at least one very similar, when I was shopping for a new one last fall. It hurt my heart too because it was too wide and 6 inches too tall for my tight space. I feel you, GMo'5, I feel you. I'll never own a prelit tree again. It's just something to go wrong before the tree needs replacing.
  8. And yet the principle applies. Where in the Constitution does it allow for taxpayer funds and facilities to support religious activities?
  9. The courts may have backed them up, but the courts are morally wrong in doing so. No tax dollar should ever go to fund a religious activity, including providing facilities for religious activities at taxpayer expense. . Christians and other religious people are morally wrong to mooch off of the taxpayers. Maybe someday we'll have judges who get the moral issue, until then we'll have to govern ourselves to do the right thing. If God wants the group to happen, He'll provide the funds by a private Christian route, not through the government.
  10. Yes, if it's religious in nature then no taxpayer funds should be used at all. ever. That includes the cost to insure, cool,heat, clean, and maintain the facility. That costs could easily be calculated by how much per hour it costs to run the school. All religious organizations can either pay for the hours they use or go somewhere else. Christians shouldn't mooch and not one penny of tax dollars should ever go to a religious activities whether it's a church, club, activity, whatever. Taxpayers should never fund any religious activity at all. ever.
  11. I'm not Mormon, but I'm from an area with a huge Mormon population. It's common for Mormon churches to build a building across the street from high schools (not on taxpayer funded property) and as I understand it, the kids can take a religious class there as an elective during the school day and hang out there at lunch. Seems reasonable to me as long as the schools are open to any other religions/philosophies/groups to do the same thing at their own close, privately funded facility. This bunch should stop whining about it being after school hours. If they're using it after school hours they should have to pay rent. I have attended 2 start up churches that met at public school multipurpose rooms on Sundays and we paid rent and maintenance fees. We don't want or expect the taxpayers to subsidize us with free facilities and insurance. We fund that ourselves.
  12. I'm just as opposed to pep rallies during instruction time as I am religious meetings during instruction time.
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