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dmmetler

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dmmetler last won the day on February 7 2014

dmmetler had the most liked content!

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About dmmetler

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    Female

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  • Biography
    Mom of a highly asynchronous kid ;)
  • Location
    Memphis TN
  • Occupation
    Music teacher

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  1. Does the city director have a state MEA/MTA membership? If so, they may be able to sign off and sponsor your son, even if most of the city orchestra members are sponsored by their schools.
  2. Outdoor cats and dogs also are a problem for wildlife. Especially cats, which are harder to keep contained, but we have an awful lot of dogs in my neighborhood that seem to have no trouble getting out of fenced yards, or vaulting through an “invisible fence”.
  3. I’d suggest a 5 foot size limit on snakes, especially if untilities are included. The really big ones take a lot of power to keep warm. I think Canine Good Citizen should be a requirement for any ESA dog that goes out in public. It’s not expensive to test and usually there are low cost classes available, too.https://www.akc.org/products-services/training-programs/canine-good-citizen/
  4. Not required, but it's nice if they can and do. And it is also nice if they can possibly have policies for pets other than dogs or cats. It is extremely hard to find a place to rent that accepts a corn snake or leopard gecko that lives in a 20 gallon terrarium and causes absolutely no mess or noise-and such pets are not uncommon and can provide a lot of emotional value for an individual. And, if it were easier to rent with pets, it would likely provide less incentive to try to get a pet labeled a service animal, and be less damaging to those who really DO depend on their animal to do more to help than just be there.
  5. I used to teach at the focused literacy optional school for the district (just over the border from MS). Basically, we were a magnet for kids who were behind on reading or language. The primary diffeeence was that the entire staff was trained in Slingerland phonics and phonics was used extensively. As a music specialist, I did a lot of auditory processing and sound cuing activities imbedded in my program, which, again, were designed to help with reading, and I was hired specifically because I am dual certified for classroom instruction as well. It worked. Most of our kids gained skills, and those who continued to struggle were able to be identified and get more focused remediation. Unfortunately, the whole test focused system killed the program because our kids usually went back to their home schools once they had caught up and were reading well, so we had perennially low test scores and were deemed “failing”.
  6. I want a BIG studio/classroom, with an outside entrance and attached bathroom and sibling/parent room (with a 2 way mirror or closed circuit TV so parents can watch, but my students can’t see/hear them) where I can be set up for Piano lessons, group music classes, academic tutoring, and homeschool clubs and avoid bringing the mess into my house or having to keep my home ready for outsiders.
  7. I’m trying to decide if it is worth investing in for my music studio, especially my youngest kids. I probably won’t use the videos, so I’d be thinking more of activities that I could teach in lessons/classes and then send home.
  8. I’d focus on finding something he likes, and let friends follow as they may. My daughter’s done competitive cheer both rec and travel (and if he likes hip hop and acrobatics, cheer may be worth checking out-it incorporates both. Many gyms offer major discounts for male athletes, and summer is usually a time that you can try it out without committing to a season. Plus a cheer gym with multiple classes a day and a liberal open gym policy in summer is essentially an air conditioned indoor playground. Boys who enjoy spending time with girls often do really well-and boys within a cheer gym do tend to build close friendships/alliances with each other), and tends to have “cheer friends” and “outside of cheer friends” without a lot of overlap-she’ll happily go to the gym and spend hours and socialize there, but not so much outside of the gym/at competitions.
  9. IPhones work on Tracfone, and you can get used ones affordably. Tracfone uses AT&T or Verizon towers, so phones branded for those systems usually can be transferred.
  10. Group texts are pretty common (or various apps with the same function for kids without phones yet) with parents following up to verify that C’s mom is going to pick up ABCD, take them to Y venue at Q time, and that D’s mom is going to retrieve them at Z venue in walking distance from Y at R time. Parents still have to be involved, but usually all the details get worked out and presented as a plan (I get a lot of “mom, am I doing anything Friday night?”) I will say that there are also a decent number of venues where one mom will take a carload and just hang out, either because the venue isn’t entirely friendly (the first question a group of teens will get while shopping is “where’s your mom”, so it’s not uncommon for a mom to go and hang out in the food court while girls look at dresses for a dance, so there is an adult in easy texting range) or because sometimes it is good for the kids to be able to leave quickly (unfortunately, fights aren’t all that uncommon in many of the teen-friendly venues in my area, so sometimes a parent will stay on site or in the car so the kids CAN exit if things seem to be getting tense).
  11. FWIW, my niece has done FLVS both full and part time due to medical issues, and it definitely is more flexible than PS, particularly for a child on an IEP (one reason why she went to FLVS is because she was simply missing so much school, either due to actively being sick, or appointments/therapy, and if she had to be logged in during a regular school day for set hours, she would have the same problems with virtual). For a child with special needs, it is definitely worth at least contacting and considering the virtual options because they may be more flexible than reports have them being.
  12. They were featured in the local “life” section of the news tonight (her team is the older all girl team in the 2 piece uniforms) Memphis Cheer on Bluff City Life. I’m impressed that they have as much footage of DD’s team as they do. The night before this was taken, we had a girl break her arm while tumbling, and her team very literally had to completely rework all the stunts for their final competition that weekend. DD is hoping for a limited travel option next season, because...well....life, so this may well be the only season she competes nationally.
  13. Mathletics, Spellodrome and IntoScience are all online programs with a head to head component. My daughter also enjoyed things like the Continental Math league, Exploratory Latin Exam, National Mythology Exam, National Science League, National Language Arts League, etc. All allow homeschoolers to register as individuals.
  14. At our end of the year science club, one of the tween boys said something insulting to one of the younger kids. DD swooped in and responded “No! You cannot talk to him like that! This is a safe place!....By the way, that was a good burn-but not here!” (The mom of the kid being verbally smacked down and I were trying hard to keep a straight face)
  15. Is there a virtual charter school in your state? A babysitter and parents working could probably supervise that better than most homeschooling programs, and special Ed would be easier to access than for a homeschooler. The main ones are solid, and if the big problem with PS is the group setting, maybe that would be a good option.
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