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BaseballandHockey

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BaseballandHockey last won the day on December 26 2020

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  1. I have always thought that it’s weird that we celebrate the same author 6 years in a row in elementary school. I like a lot of Dr Seuss. I used a lot. But there are so many others, and it seems like a day that celebrates reading should celebrate the great variety of books. So when it was announced that they weren’t theming it as Dr Seuss I was pleased. I’d love to see a rotation of 6 authors, with Seuss as one, so they each kid would do each one once. That has nothing to do with racism.
  2. Have you read the book? He’s walking home and thinking how boring his town is and how his dad is going to ask him what he saw on his walk, and he starts to think of all the fun lies he can tell. But in the end he decides he can’t lie to his father. So he tells him the truth — all he saw was a plain horse and wagon on Mulberry Street. The plot is clear. There is no actual parade.
  3. Me too! I was quite curious and disappointed.
  4. I think there are issues with how the character is drawn and dressed. The image is absolutely a racist portrayal. But even if the image was fixed, an equally problematic element of the book is that the plot line is basically that the kid gets bored and makes up the weirdest most fantastical story he can about things you’d never see in real life in America. The Chinese character is presented as the equivalent of an elephant walking down the street in suburbia, equally weird and out of place. Not a way I would want my Chinese American students to be thought of.
  5. I've made the decision to have my kid take an experimental med. We didn't know the effect the medication would have on his developing body. But we did know the effect his disease was having, and so we decided to take a gamble. I see this vaccine in the same way. We have lots of reasons to believe that the vaccine will be safe, based on other vaccines, and on the way mRNA works in people's bodies. But the truth is that we don't really know. However, we do know the impact that covid is having on pregnant women, and we do know that it's leading to outcomes like prenatal birth, prenatal
  6. As I read it, the parent and the administrator who spoke off the record both say there was no contact. On the record, the school system is saying that their policy is to place robocalls and make home visits, but that they can't speak about this particular case. I am inclined to believe the administrator who spoke off the record, and the parent, because they agree with each other, and that the home visit didn't happen. Having said that, where I teach, home visits for truancy are made by CPS. A CPS worker is not going to know or be able to comment on something on a transcript from pre
  7. OK, I'm back. So, how do we teach kids procedural knowledge like phonemic awareness and letter names and sounds while simultaneously teaching kids that these are powerful things that can be used in meaningful ways? How do we help kids engaged and motivated? them and revisiting them in their working memory, which is what builds memory? Here are a few activities I particularly like. A lot of this comes from Karen Erickson, who I referenced above, combines with my own experiences. One place I would slightly disagree with Karen Erickson is that she makes a big deal about the divi
  8. I've also read something, not sure if it's a valid concern, that says that if the virus is primarily spreading in children, it's likely that any new variants that spread widely will be those that spread more easily in children. That's a scary thought.
  9. I would probably reach out to her case manager and ask them to distribute the IEP again, or flag it, or draw attention to it. I might also reconvene and IEP meeting and talk about whether different accommodations make sense. But I'd let the case manager be the one sharing the diagnosis, and I'd keep my messaging to things like "well X is really hard for her. We're working on it, but right now in the classroom she needs Y support." Is she exposed to strong role models of adults with disabilities involved in self advocacy or political advocacy? Sometimes those voices can really help.
  10. I think that if this is a concern, and if you're in a position where firing the help would make it hard to get it back, then you need to consider letting her experience the consequences of not using her accommodations and supports in a setting where she can potentially do less damage. Some kids need to learn the hard way. Now, part of that is understanding what the impact of both firing her support at 18, or of failing a class at 16 would be. Is she planning on applying to colleges where a F would torpedo her chances? Would summer school replace something you think is critical like
  11. Cloistered nuns perhaps? Newborns? People who have been in comas since 1982? Otherwise, I'm with you. Those are the categories I can come up with.
  12. No, in my analogy, the parent is the quarterback who can't do their job because no one has taught them, or given them to knowledge they need to find solutions on their own. If they went to school from 5 - 16, and many of the parents I work with did not make it that far, but if the did then what they learned at school almost certainly that school makes no sense, and that advocating in that system doesn't work, and that what you need to do is to concentrate on getting through with a little damage as possible. Because, let's be honest, if a kid is enrolled in Algebra 2 and English III cla
  13. Whether or not it has to be racist it is something that is applied in a manner that reinforces patterns of racism in our society. Fire isn't inherently racist. It doesn't "have to be racist". But when people use fire as a tool to oppress black people, by burning their homes or churches, or by intimidate them through burning crosses, it becomes a racist tool. The idea that there are parents who don't care, and that therefore we don't need to continue to search for the causes of things like this, and address them, is used in a racist manner in our country. It is used by people who w
  14. It means that more than half of the students who had been at his school less than 4 years had passed less than 3 classes during that time.
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