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AngelaR

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About AngelaR

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    Hive Mind Worker Bee

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  1. My DD, who’s in 1st grade, will be going from Level 1 back tracking a little to Halfway through LOE Foundations A, to get caught up with spelling. She’s pretty good at writing, so I was planning on continuing through with HWOT (In HWOT order )till we get done with it (I think we’re about 1/2 way through the transitional Kindergarten book. Then, I’ll probably consider doing doing LOE writing or maybe even doing cursive. I’m not really sure. Did your little finish AAR Level 1? Then where in LOE Foundations are you going?
  2. Actually, we started with AAR and HWOT this year, transition level I think it was called. My little man’s fine motor is ATROCIOUS, poor thing, so we just do the best we can with HWOT and leave it at that. So, when I switch him to LOE, I think I’ll leave him with HWOT.
  3. That what I think I’m going to do. Calling them is a great idea. The online assessment test recommended I start at A with her bc she hasn’t had any spelling. But she’ll be SO BORED with the reading. But there will be the games, which is why I’m switching. 😄 Are you switching too? I just hope it doesn’t mess up the progress she’s made so far.
  4. As a history teacher, I am greatly intrigued. What methods are those? Is that the McGuffy readers??
  5. I have two kids, girl in 1st and boy in K. Last year, DD "learned" to read in PS Kindergarten. In March, when quarantine began, I started her on AAR Level 1. She has(and I have) done OK with AAR. There are lots of parts I don't particularly like (fluency sheets, anyone???), and I've adapted it to add a little more practice reading at a lower level with BOB Books, and it's not going too badly. We are will begin AAR Level 2 in about 2 weeks. But frankly, she doesn't love reading, even though she does pretty well at it. Her biggest issue is guessing the words based on the pictures (taught
  6. FWIW, I'm beginning this year as a new homeschooler, so I'm still working the whole thing out myself, but here's our schedule, for a Kindergartner and a 1st grader: For both levels, we do the Kindergarten Bible curriculum from Veritas Press, which centers around The Children's Story Bible by Catherine Voss. Also has some coloring and singing. It is also scripted. About 10 minutes, at the breakfast table, while they finish eating. Pledge and Calendar. Kinder: AAR pre-reading, 15 minutes. Kindergarten Math with Confidence by Kate Snow, 10 minutes. I LOVE this...It'
  7. Just FYI, I got my daughter's First Grade "Literature/Reading" from someone on Ebay who was selling it as a set. Also, I bought the first semester's worth of Read Aloud and Science/History books on Ebay for about 1/2 the price. I was going to do Interlibrary Loan for the books our library didn't have, but then COVID quarantine and all the libraries shut down, so I took the plunge and bought them. We'll see what second semester brings.
  8. 😁 Heh!!! We dropped a WHOLE bunch from the enrichment guide after week 1.
  9. Very good information to know. Thank you for that heads up!
  10. To follow up, what about narration, along the lines of Charlotte Mason? Would that be more helpful at this age? Or just as joy-sucking? Would there be any added benefit to the kids to do that, or just read with them? Thank you all for your experience and insight!
  11. Ha!! I also wish I’d never heard of Saxon math. Sadly, it’s what I had to use as a student in my Christian school for jr high and high school math. You can be sure, I’ve steered clear of it for my own kids, but it obviously works for lots of people on these forums.
  12. I liked the idea of singing to help with reading. My kids LOVE singjno and I’d never thought of using that to help with reading ability, but it’s brilliant!!!
  13. Thank you SOOOO much for your sample and the book lists. I may make some new word lists for her along those lines, but as I said, she's not dyslexic, so perhaps I'll just do supplemental readers instead. Also good to know about Abecedarian resource as my KG DS is a late bloomer and has a few signs of dyslexia but as he's maturing, the signs are disappearing, so hopefully not.
  14. Thanks! Watching it now. Looking forward to learning lots!!
  15. She generally does just fine on reading the word lists, it's just hard to get through because it's boring as all get out, for me and for her. She more often struggles in the reading, because she's trying to look at the pictures to read instead of looking at the words (she picked up this lovely habit at PS Kindergarten last year...). Whereas she actually reads the word lists because there are no pictures. They are just so long and soul killing for both of us. She left KG last year disliking reading, and I'm trying to wean her out of that...but it's hard to know how to help her exactly. So,
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