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Mom21

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  1. Perhaps consider the Writing and Rhetoric series at Classical Academic Press.
  2. There is a quick reference chart that she provides here as well, mentioning W&R as an option is high school.
  3. After Fallacy Detective and Thinking Toolbox we chose the CAP products for logic: The Art of Argument, Argument Builder, Discovery of Deduction, etc. We found them to be informative (as much as, or possibly even more so as far as I can see, than either MP or Nance’s), engaging (dull and boring was not an option), and even fun.
  4. Besides being discussed in threads here which I’ll never be able to find, it may be in this podcast—an interview with the author, Paul Kortepeter.
  5. We hated WWS, but love W&R! As I recall, I believe the author's recommendations for a faster pace through the series would be W&R Books 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9 and 10, essentially dropping Books 3, 6, and 8. I have to say that after going through the whole series, I concur with his suggestion. My young man completed Books 9 & 10 this year for 9th grade, previously Books 1-8. The next two, Books 11 and 12, haven't been released yet, so for us.... The Argument Builder and/or The Art of Poetry along with Everyday Debate & Discussion are good for 10th, with Rhetoric Alive! Book 1 for 11th grade and Rhetoric Alive! Senior Thesis for 12th grade. Another option would be using the Rhetoric Alive! series in 10th and 11th grades, leaving room for something else in 12th grade, but most likely the former.
  6. Have you seen their recommendations? Old Western Culture Highschool Transcript Information
  7. I am of the opinion that you would just get used to it with time, especially since they are color coordinated and thickness varies from booklet to booklet in each module. We have a math shelf on our bookstand that still houses all of Algebra: A Complete Course, as well as Geometry: A Complete Course. My young man has referred back to his Algebra course notes from previous modules when working through Algebra, and now—as we are in Module E of Geometry—he refers back to his Geometry course notes from previous modules, as well as his Algebra courses notes once or twice. As my young man moves through each Geometry module, he takes the previous course notes and stacks them together—oldest notes on bottom up to most current on top—with the current module, for quick reference. When he pulls his daily work from the shelf, his booklets stack nicely in order with graph paper/tablet on top, worktext next, and newest set of course notes working down to oldest set on bottom. I pull the quizzes/tests and answers from the shelf when ready to be utilized. Easy breezy.
  8. This topic is somewhat familiar to me as my son is looking into doing the same. Personally, I am planning on it being an elective Occupational Education course. It can take the place of a science credit, in my state.
  9. Perhaps I misspoke. The private interview is a standard, required procedure with homeschoolers for two colleges in particular, both a state university (not exactly friendly to homeschoolers) and a private university (welcoming to homeschoolers, but with high standards for everyone). Some form of Comprehensive Record or documentation/proof is required for homeschoolers at both colleges seeking scholarships and would have already been sent and reviewed prior to the meeting, but with the possibility of being discussed therein. I will be sending hard copies of our Comprehensive Record to any and all colleges in which he applies, in addition to whatever other forms are filed—the Common App and such.
  10. Yes, you’ve made your opinion clear. As for this particular subject and curriculum used, when the course description page is seen as a whole, which includes the course schematic chart that takes up one-third of the page and is clearly seen (regardless of being linked to the larger format of the chart in the digital format), as well as the method of grading chart (as seen in this sample), I believe that it speaks perfectly well for the student and our particular purpose. It’s just another way to “sell” the student, hence why it was offered.
  11. The yearly presentation portfolios are twofold: for our own records and/or in the case of an emergency—should anything happen to us (parents), God forbid, wherein our young man would need to be enrolled in a high school elsewhere, then we have documentation ready to go. I have a stickable USB Drive pocket inside each portfolio that includes both a printable and a digital file of the entire portfolio. The Comprehensive Record is a final compilation of all high school years and the one that will be used for college admissions, as requested by all the colleges in which he will apply, wherein a formal, private interview and review of those records is standard procedure with homeschool applicants. I have no qualms with assigning the "Honors" designation to the early high school credits (Algebra I & II courses), nor the Geometry course, as the publisher recommends it, and he certainly earned them. From one place or another, the descriptions were sited from the publisher. I, personally, don't see them as condescending, nor are they meant to be that way, rather, just factual. I realize everyone has their own way of record keeping, this is just mine, open for others to glean or toss. I will consider your comments.
  12. I compiled the following course descriptions from information provided on VT's site and created Course Description pages similar to Lee Binz's approach. With permission from VideoTextInteractive, I've also included an image (linkable in pdf format to the larger online image) of the Course Schematics for Algebra (I & II) and Geometry, as found on their site. On a side note, I've already started setting up my Comprehensive Record and found the Staples 24-page presentation book to be ideal for my young man's ninth grade high school record. I'll probably do this annually, one for each year, and then a final Comprehensive High School Record using the Itoya I-Series Art Portfolio, which has more pages available. If you're interested, I'll pm samples of these Course Description pages to you. Course Description Math: Honors Algebra 1 VideoText Algebra: A Complete Course is designed to thoroughly cover all aspects of Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1, and Algebra 2, as well as Pre-Calculus, laying a firm foundation for students advancing to VideoText Geometry: A Complete Course. As it covers lessons in a conceptual manner, topics such as the structure of mathematics, first-degree (and higher) relations, rational relations, quadratic relations, conic sections, and literal degree relations, are broken down into detailed examinations of each in order to master every individual concept within. This Algebra program certainly contains “Advanced” Algebra, in that it covers all Algebraic concepts that are even in college courses, and certainly is an “Honors” course. In the VideoText Algebra program, Modules A, B, C, D, and E constitute what is traditionally called “Algebra 1”. That means material in all of these Modules was included in order to adequately compare VideoText to any other “Algebra 1” course. However, as the Algebra credits overlap in the program, there really is no defining point for breaking up Algebra credits. Modules A-B cover “Pre-Algebra” topics, while Modules A-E also cover “Algebra 1” topics with Modules B-F covering topics found in “Algebra 2” and “Pre-Calculus.” Course Description Math: Honors Algebra 2 VideoText Algebra: A Complete Course is designed to thoroughly cover all aspects of Pre-Algebra, Algebra 1, and Algebra 2, as well as Pre-Calculus, laying a firm foundation for students advancing to VideoText Geometry: A Complete Course. As it covers lessons in a conceptual manner, topics such as the structure of mathematics, first-degree (and higher) relations, rational relations, quadratic relations, conic sections, and literal degree relations, are broken down into detailed examinations of each in order to master every individual concept within. This Algebra program certainly contains “Advanced” Algebra, in that it covers all Algebraic concepts that are even in college courses, and certainly is an “Honors” course. In the VideoText Algebra program, Modules B (starting with Unit II), C, D, E, and F constitute what is traditionally called “Algebra 2”. However, as the Algebra credits overlap in the program, there really is no defining point for breaking up Algebra credits. Modules A-E cover “Algebra 1” topics, while Modules B-F cover topics found in “Algebra 2” and “Pre-Calculus.” Course Description Math: Honors Geometry VideoText Geometry: A Complete Course is designed to thoroughly cover all aspects of Geometry, as well as Trigonometry and what is generally known as “Pre-Calculus”. As it covers lessons in a conceptual manner, topics such as geometric measurement, theorems & postulates, proofs, closed plane curves, constructions, and trigonometric relations, are broken down into detailed examinations of each in order to master every individual concept within. This Geometry course warrants the term “Honors” because of a significant treatment of formal logic, a more exhaustive study of proofs and theorems, and the complete study of all Plane Geometric shapes up through circles. In the VideoText Geometry program, Modules A, B, C, D, and E constitute what is traditionally called “Geometry”. That means material in all of these Modules was included in order to adequately compare VideoText to any other “Geometry” course. However, as the credits overlap in the program, there really is no defining point for breaking up Geometry, Pre-Calculus, and Trigonometry credits. Modules A-E cover “Geometry” and “Pre-Calculus” topics, while Modules E-F cover topics found in “Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus.” Course Description Math: Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus After completing all of the VideoText Algebra and Geometry Programs, the student will be entitled to one Algebra credit, one Geometry credit, and one credit for Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (as these courses combined equal a single credit). In VT Geometry, Modules A, B, C, D, and E constitute what is traditionally called “Geometry”. That means material in all of these Modules was included in order to adequately compare VideoText to any other “Geometry” course. However, as the credits overlap in the program, there really is no defining point for breaking up Geometry, Pre-Calculus, and Trigonometry credits. Modules A-E cover “Geometry” and “Pre-Calculus” topics, while Modules E-F cover topics found in “Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus.” The Algebra credits also overlap in the program, as there really is no defining point for breaking up Algebra credits. Modules A-E cover “Algebra 1” topics, while Modules B-F cover topics found in “Algebra 2” and “Pre-Calculus.” Some concepts typically covered in Pre-Calculus are placed at the end of the Algebra program because this is where they actually belong. This is because Pre-Calculus is normally a “waste-basket” where many Algebra or Geometry topics end up due to lack of time. However, since the VT program is covering these topics where they belong, it is less noticeable as an actual Pre-Calculus “section.” Therefore, In the VideoText programs, Module F (containing Trigonometry and remaining Pre-Calculus topics) of both the VideoText Geometry and VideoText Algebra programs make up the Trigonometry and Pre-Calculus credit.
  13. Hit: Supplemental Tutoring sessions through Scholé Academy for Writing & Rhetoric at home. Miss: PAHomeschoolers AP Computer Science A by Cynthia Lang. We withdrew from this class and will attempt another AP CS A course elsewhere, not by this teacher.
  14. Physical Education Outside the Box – The HomeScholar
  15. Also, OWC does things a bit differently than VP with regards to awarding credits. Old Western Culture Highschool Transcript Information
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