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RosemaryAndThyme

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About RosemaryAndThyme

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    The Herder of Cats

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  1. Yes! It's definitely possible. In my case, I started to feel... I don't know... stupid I guess. It's not a good description, but I had trouble focusing and retaining material. I went to graduate school at that point and my "academic brain" came back quickly. :) But for you, I recommend trying a purposeful reading strategy. If we just read text, most of us will forget the majority of what we read even if the text is something like a high interest novel. If you read with a purpose it is much easier to not only understand what the text is saying, but also to remember and make connections with other things you already know. My favorite reading method is called SQ3R, if you haven't come across it before. There are many websites that describe it and also videos. Here is a link to a short version https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dhcSP_Myjg and another, longer one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ui2mpPDP7E
  2. Would he be willing/interested in working in corporate law? He could do things like read contracts, work on employee litigation (wrongful termination, etc.), or perhaps focus on intellectual property (trademarks, patents, etc.). He would probably need to take some continuing education courses, but that should not be as intense as studying for his degree. And then he could just apply for jobs.
  3. We used to belong to a CSA for two or three years. It was most definitely not cost-effective (quite expensive even compared to farmer's market), but the quality of produce was excellent and we did get to try vegetables we would not have eat otherwise. Our CSA ran from early May through the end October. The best produce was naturally toward the end of summer and early fall while the spring was mainly different types of lettuce, radishes, and other greens. We don't eat that many greens, and quite a bit of those were not eaten. In the summer we got things like gooseberries, red and black currants, tomatoes, eggplant, etc. We loved the fruit part of the share, but there wasn't quite enough of it and too much lettuce. The main reason we stopped was the inconvenience. It was too far to drive to pick it up.
  4. Hi, I can't tell you which program to try, but I can describe what it's like to use Novare's Introductory Physics. Actually, we have their secular version, but it is pretty much the same text minus the religious teaching. This is a mastery program, and it requires a good amount of memorization. With the full package you get a CD with a suggested schedule, quizzes, study guides, labs, etc. The schedule will tell you which sections of the text to assign each day, when to give the student their weekly review guide, when to do chapter exercises, etc. Each week there are flash cards to make and study, reading, and some days there are quizzes or review. Material is cumulative, which is what leads to mastery - even though you may have learned the scientific inquiry process in the first two weeks, it will keep showing up in quizzes in some way or another. Same goes for all the other material, which I like. You'll be memorizing things like equations, major theories, scientists (who, what, when, why important), conversion factors and prefixes, speed of light in vacuum, etc. This program can be done at the same time as Algebra 1, but the student needs to be able to manipulate simple equations to get them to the form they need. So, given F=m*a, they will need to be comfortable with rewriting it to solve for m for example. Unit conversions are also important. Setting up problems properly, showing work, writing full sentences for explanations, using correct grammar and spelling are all important. That is explained in grading rubrics. This is not a hands-on program like Rainbow, but it does include 4 labs. These are 4 full on, proper labs, not demonstrations. If you buy the lab guide, it will teach you how to keep a real lab notebook, set up the hypothesis, write out materials, procedure, etc. Then you will be collecting data, plotting it in Excel, analyzing margin of error, etc. Some of the labs require expensive materials. We are not doing those. Some can be done with mostly household or easy to get items. Home Science Tools website does sell the kit if you are interested. So, this is a rigorous, no-nonsense, well-written program with clear explanations in the text, no fluff, and high standards for output. It would likely not work for your younger at this stage, but might be good for your older.
  5. I've had this happen. I even got on a chat session with the insurance beforehand and asked them if the flu shot will be covered at the Minute Clinic, which they said 100% yes. Well, that's not how they processed it. While we only had to pay a portion out of pocket, I wasn't happy because our insurance says it covers preventive medicine at 100% in network. It turns out that yes, they do cover 100% but only as part of a preventive doctor visit. I finally got that information out of them. So from now on, we'll have to make a doctor's appointment for flu shots. :(
  6. This. We had cake, and I think we fed each other a small bite, but there was definitely no cake smashing. Our wedding was small, but the whole preparation process and the wedding itself was so stressful. I was so disappointed to be dictated whom to invite, how long our engagement should last, "what people would think",etc. If I was older and more confident in myself, I would have insisted on a simple church wedding with no formal reception whatsoever, and I'm pretty sure my husband would have preferred that, too. I think I would have been happy to just get changed out of my dress and go out for lunch with a few friends. Honestly, the best part of the wedding was when it was over. Still happily married after 21 years.
  7. It doesn't really make sense because I don't have synesthesia, but I found this video that made it more accessible. I don't have a VR set, and it probably looks much better with one, but even without it I think the video does a really good job showing what a person with synesthesia would experience. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obrBAysVef0
  8. On May 23, 2019, ALDI, in association with ADM Milling Co., recalled 5-lb. bags of Baker’s Corner All Purpose Flour because they may be contaminated with E. coli. Recalled flour was sold at retail locations in the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Massachussetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia. Consumers should not use any of the recalled flour and should throw recalled flour away. If you stored flour purchased from ALDI in another container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or “better by” date, throw it away. Consumers should thoroughly wash the containers before using them again. https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2019/flour-05-19/index.html
  9. I like Ahmad tea, which I get from Amazon on auto-delivery. There are many types and flavors available, and you can get it in bags or loose leaf. I think Ahmad is a British brand, though I'm not entirely sure. At the time of this post, I can see a box of 100 tea bags of "English Tea #1" for $6.74. They also sell herbal, decaf, green, black flavored, green flavored, fruit flavored, etc. Here, for example, is a box of loose leaf cardamon flavored black tea. I actually bought the wooden tea keeper box, which comes with the tea in it, and have been refilling it with various flavors for the last 3 years.
  10. We moved, and I ended up with no vaccination record when I entered high school. I had to have proof of my vaccination, and the (public) school directed us to a free vaccination clinic. I went with my mother and got all the shots I needed in one visit. It wasn't pleasant, and the line was long, but it was free and we got it done. Granted, this was a very long time ago, but maybe you could check if there is a free clinic in your area? Another option would be to get blood tests that check for antibody titers. I did a quick Google search, and it looks like CVS Minute Clinic can do this.
  11. Do you have an IKEA within a reasonable driving distance? We've had their Dinera dishes for at least 10 years. The colors get updated every couple of years - right now they have a grey/blue, grey, and a pale pink. Mine are storm blue and pale green, but the shapes are the same. I think sometimes they change the shape of the bowl a little - if you go, make sure you can stack them nicely. One year I wanted to add a new color, but the bowls didn't stack. I don't know if this year's colors stack well or not. The dishes have a good feel and weight and definitely go into the microwave. I can't tell you about dishwasher because I don't have one of those, but they probably go into the dishwasher, too. Reasonably priced, too. You can get a mix of colors like we did or just pick one color.
  12. I haven't read all the responses, but a few posts such as Kiana's really resonated with me. I teach university classes, and I see so many students who do not understand the basics of percentages. I usually show them a pie chart with percentages in each slice, something like, 35%, 70%, 5%, 43% - all in one pie. I ask them, what is wrong with this picture? I have yet to have one student tell me that you can't have a pie chart add up to more than 100%. I've been teaching for over 10 years. I can't make an assumption that they can calculate a problem like "if Jane had a starting salary of $40,000 with an annual raise of 3%, what is her salary after 5 years?". Before I can ask this, I need to show them how to calculate 3% of $40,000, what it means, and why you can't just add that number to itself 5 times to get the ending salary. I was shocked at first, now I just plan on spending time teaching this because we can't get through the rest of the materials without such basics.
  13. Pretty much never and not at all. If I need to take notes, I do it in a separate notebook. I occasionally highlight text in digital books, but that is only because I can turn highlights off. If I am looking at highlighted and/or annotated text, like Hunter's examples above, my eyes and mind only see the yellow boxes, underlines, ovals, etc. Pretend that the text itself is gone, and all you see are the highlights, arrows, and boxes on a blank piece of paper. It takes a lot of processing for me to distinguish the text that is layered underneath to the point of getting a migraine. This is also why I really dislike textbooks that have colored boxes, decorative elements (squiggle lines, etc), quotes in the margins, etc. It is frustrating for me to read such text because my mind and eyes want to jump there instead of following the explanations in the main body. I recently had a stats textbook like this, and it was a huge struggle to read it. Just give me black text on white paper without huge margins, and I'll be happy.
  14. I was so tired of this that I instituted Mommy's Finding Service. I tell them that if I find it where I said it would be in the next 5 minutes, it would cost them $5 per occurrence. This has been so effective that I haven't been paid yet. 😃
  15. Oh yes, far too frequently of late. My oldest was calculating surface area of a cylinder (formula here just in case :) ). You have to add the areas of the top and bottom circles as well as the surface area of the "wall". So instead of adding these individual numbers, which were already in square meters, she multiplied them. It was actually funny because if you multiply the two, you get meters to the fourth power, something like the fourth dimension. 😄
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