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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/21/2019 in all areas

  1. 56 points
    Today was the first day of recitation for Intro Chem which is a required class. The instructor started pretty basic, and the kids behind ds in the class were making somewhat-loud, rude comments about the class being useless, and why did they bother to show up, etc. After class, two of them went up to the instructor and said to him "next time, why don't you just tell anyone who knows anything about chemistry to leave. This class just wasted my time. etc" He said it went on for at least a minute or two. DS waited for the kids to leave the class and went up to the instructor and said "Thanks so much for teaching this recitation. Looks like you have a pretty tough crowd here, but I appreciate you being here." The instructor then asks his name and they get to talking. DS has been working in a chemistry lab this summer and apparently they have been doing the same type of research in materials science and really hit it off. DS came home and called me to say not just how he couldn't believe how rude the kids were, but that he felt good about making the effort to fix it.
  2. 31 points
    Is doing the thing you will not do a major sin--that is, in the unmarried couple living together example, is entering the house of an unmarried couple a major sin according to your beliefs? Not is living together unmarried major sin. This matters. Jesus did not himself commit sins, but he also did not hesitate to enter the homes of sinners or eat with sinners. He was not sullied by relationships with imperfect people, nor was he concerned that by interacting with them he was condoning their sins.
  3. 29 points
    Over the last few weeks, as my DD10's GS troop has gone back to (B&M) school, as we have engaged in the community a bit, I have been experiencing feelings lol. In our previous location, I knew we were there temporarily and much of the stuff we did regarding kids activities and social engagements was done with full knowledge that all that stuff was temporary. We intend to stay here permanently and are therefore engaging with the community more. And I am realizing how different we are. Mostly, I don't care about differences. I know what my goals are regarding parenting and education of my kids and I am ok with going against the norm. But, because we were.............not isolated, but isolated? from most folks not family, plus so much else going on like dealing with family estates from afar, long distance home owner crisis stuff, etc....I guess I didn't realize just how different our philosophies regarding parenting and education of my kids really is from so many others. So, being back................in society (for lack of a better phrase..........I really felt pretty isolated being in the rural/semi rural location we were) has shown me a lot and made me question myself. This weekend, I was out of town, and visiting family I don't see often. So, not the closer family we are usually working to maintain relationships with but cousins and great grandparents and second cousins etc. People who know me but don't know all of the struggles we have like the ASD diagnosis and such were telling me how awesome my kids were. Public school teachers were telling me how impressed they were with my kids. Random people who are like cousin's fiance's sister's kid were telling me that they loved talking to my kids. And then, family who I know better, some of whom have had struggles with their own kids, actually said things like "I wish I had done that." And THEN, when some of these same people are reminded that I have an older kid who is 23 and doing ok......really, I won't lie, I was feeling some love. I know full well that there is a measure of my kids success and behaviors and so on that really have nothing to do with me. But, this weekend,, after seeing so many things that are so different, that so many people recognized that the children who are at least in part products of the parenting decisions I have made, really are great people.............yeah, I am feeling a bit validated. Maybe, just maybe, I really am doing the right things for us.
  4. 27 points
    Honestly, it's both. Talent and practice. The higher the achievement level, the more of both is required. A person with mediocre natural talent in an area can put in a hours and hours of practice and be better than a person with tons of natural talent who doesn't do the practice. They won't, however, equal the achievement of a person with tons of natural talent who puts in the same number of hours of practice. 90+% of gymnasts who put just as much time and effort into practice as Simone Biles are NOT going to achieve at her level. And of course no one who puts in only one hour of practice for every ten she puts in is going to come close. And the ability to engage in all that practice is mediated by other things such as natural executive function skills, general mental health, support, opportunities, etc. There's a fair bit of research into human psychology that demonstrates that we are all of us inclined to ascribe our own achievements to personal effort and our failures to circumstance, while simultaneously ascribing the achievements of others more to circumstance/luck and their shortcomings to lack of effort or other things we think of as being under their control. That darn bias in our judgment plays right into a tendency to be jealous of people who achieve and equally contemptuous of those who don't. The tendency to view people who achieve as somehow morally superior is particularly problematic in my mind; we simply don't have the capacity to make such judgments. And so often those who are failing to achieve are not only not receiving society's accolades, they are being actively heaped with contempt. The child with autism who has a meltdown in the grocery store and that child's parent both receive social condemnation. The child with ADHD is labeled by adults and peers as lazy and not trying and disruptive. The kid with the IQ of 80 who in spite of a crazy amount of work doesn't do as well on the SAT as the kid with an IQ of 120 gets their score back only to learn they are in the bottom 20%. The kid with a speech impediment is viewed as dumb. I don't have a solution to the various challenges surrounding this issue. Parents should be able to publicly rejoice in their own children's achievements. I think parents of high achieving kids can also remain aware that hearing of such achievements is going to be profoundly painful to some other parents. And that jealousy is also a normal human reaction and mental biases work both ways.
  5. 25 points
    Yesterday I finished piecing the quilt on the left- it was a year long Block of the Month program and it took me a bajillion hours to piece it. It’s for the guest room our grands will sleep in when they visit. I’ll quilt it on my sister’s long arm machine. Usually she does it for me but I have moved close enough that I can visit and learn to do it myself. The shoes will be painted to be my game day shoes. I put the gesso on the canvas today and roughed in the drawing/lettering. Luckily the opening game is an away game so I have more than a week to finish them. I’m not a painter at all- I have no drawing or painting talent. But thought it would be fun to try something new. Can’t wait to hear about projects everyone is working on. I’d love to try some new crafts!
  6. 25 points
    It’s a California thing. I would totally ignore it unless you plan on grinding it up and eating or breathing it. They have put labels on literally almost everything, including coffee, to where it is now a meaningless warning. It’s honestly ridiculous.
  7. 24 points
    Rejoice or head scratch with me. I think I’ve figured out why non-home-educating SAHMs get made fun of for sitting around watching Netflix and eating bonbons. This is so easy!!! So background - my oldest four just went up to Alaska last night to hang with the grandparents for a few weeks, so I only have the two little boys. That’s score one of ‘life is so easy again’. Two special needs little guys is just not that hard. Score two? Older little guy is my only non homeschool person and just hopped on the bus for his morning preschool program. Baby is still sleeping. NOW THAT PRESCHOOLER IS GONE I HAVE SO MUCH SPARE TIME?! Like, on a normal day I’m rushing my older kids to finish eating and do their cleanup chore so we can start cramming on school. I spend the entire preschooler’s time gone working with the third and first grader and trying to not ignore the toddler (who is usually playing and watching cartoons). Then as soon as the preschooler comes home the youngest four are done-ish and watching movies while I finish up with the older girls and make food. Then usually I’m rushing off to therapy anywhere from 3-4 days a week, plus IE here at home and such. So I don’t have time to relax, let alone do actual chores, until about 6:30 each night. Which ain’t happening most days, if I’m honest. Just the basics to keep things functional. Less kids and not homeschooling is such a CAKEWALK?! How did I not know this? Like, I wouldn’t trade my life for anything but it feels remarkably sedate and relaxed and not scheduled right now, even with therapy and little kid needs still in place. This is just laughably chill. I feel like I’ve been missing out on all the benefits of being a SAHM by homeschooling 🤣 Like, I’m not really a SAHM so much as an educator who works at home. Because this is such a vacation it’s not even funny. Not in the same universe of comparable. I totally get the allure of shoving the kids in school now. I’m never usually without students, so this is honestly a novel experience. Wow. End joyous braindump. I big puffy heart love my vacation from all the hard of many kids and many grades 🥳
  8. 23 points
    HERE IS SHILOH! WELCOME LITTLE PUPPY! Thanks for waiting! She's such a squirt and fast. What is the hyper run thing all about? Our first lab did that on occasion. She turned 11 weeks Labor Day and was born June 17.
  9. 22 points
    Yeah, that happened here too. Eldest told me that she didn't remember anything we did during our 9 years of homeschooling. Me: Really? You don't remember raising silkworms from eggs, or building a pyramid out of little mud bricks that we made from the dirt and grass in the backyard, or the human body we built piece by piece as we studied the systems, or all the hours we spent reading aloud, or any of that? Her: No. I don't remember anything from that time. Me, to myself: Ouch. Well, that was 9 years wasted. I could have been working all that time. I'd be making six figures by now. We'd be rich and I'd have a fulfilling career. Fast forward a few years, and now she's having happy little memory flashes. "Remember when we made little bricks and built a pyramid with a little mummy inside?" Me: Yes. I remember... (sigh)
  10. 20 points
    I find it really odd, on a homeschooling board with lots of very high-achieving kids who get into top schools, that the idea of homeschooling a really smart, talented student who desperately wants to be homeschooled would be seen as a last resort — only acceptable if she can't be medically/psychologically "patched up" enough to tolerate being dumped back into the extremely competitive, pressure-cooker environment that destroyed her love of learning and sucked all the joy out of her life. That sends the message that following her instincts, choosing the environment she feels is best for her, is a sign of weakness, a failure, evidence that she's just not good enough to handle the "best" education. How is that not going to increase her anxiety and her feelings of failure and self-doubt and worries about the future??? Homeschooling is not something you "settle" for only if you're not good enough, or smart enough, or strong enough, for a high-stress private school. For many students it is the best way to get the best possible education. No college is going to look at a really smart, talented kid who took control of her own education and can write about it in a passionate and articulate way, and think "oh no, we don't want a mature, self-motivated kid with national writing awards, we'll just take another one of those nearly-identical valedictorians with 14 APs and 3 club presidencies who founded a fake charity."
  11. 18 points
    At least she is going to jail. Everyone seemed pretty sure that she was going to escape that- pleading guilty, being contrite, etc. All of these entitled criminals are contrite that they were caught. Personally, I think her community service should be getting trained as a Barton or OG tutor and providing dsylexia tutoring for poor kids for free for the rest of her life. These people hit our family right where we live: dd2 is an athlete with dyslexia and slow processing disorder. I am still enraged by their attempts to downplay their actions and their pleading that they are sorry.
  12. 18 points
    All that airport stuff is security theater. It's garbage, really. I'd deride it as a waste of time, except that what it does to us is worse - it conditions us all to think that this sort of ludicrous overreach is necessary and normal.
  13. 18 points
    I swear, this is my number one complaint about people posting classes and events on homeschool lists. Like, I'm on some lists for an entire state and others for the neighboring county that takes well over an hour to drive from one end to the other. And yet probably half of the "come check out our co-op" and "I'm offering this class/group" posts do not give any clue as to where it takes place. And for a large portion of those, clicking on the website link doesn't say either. Like, why do you make an entire page for your class/group/co-op and never once give an address. Or, if it's your personal address and you don't want to post it, at least give what town you're in? Your general area? Ugh.
  14. 17 points
    UPDATE I am very thankful for all of your help with this. I am not sure I can truly express how thankful I am to have such an amazing group of people as a sounding board. Your advice was solid and unbiased and greatly appreciated. I have been thinking about this a lot. The health problems she is having is causing the anxiety with her being at school. She began to express to me that she couldn't go back around mid summer when she began having more health issues (which are unresolved). She would express that she couldn't function in that environment feeling so bad. The core isn't a lack of desire to be at school as much she knows she can't perform her best feeling terribly. We are working to figure out her health issues and we are on specialist #3. So where are we now? We gave DD the choice and left the ball completely in her court. She has been extremely torn because she loves her friends and teachers and so much about the school. She actually went to school yesterday after being out last wed-friday because of sickness. Adding to the stress is this factor too - how many days are they allowed to miss for AP classes? 8! Only 8! And that includes college visits if you do those on school days. She went yesterday and stayed home again today because she just feels too bad. So she has now reached half of absences for the year in only two weeks of school. She seems pretty solid about coming home. She can't learn in this environment the way that she feels. And once upon a time she could do all of their busy work and explore more on her own and dig deeper but she has no energy for that anymore. I wrote a letter explaining the struggle with health issues to the head of upper school. We will see how they respond. If they offer a medical leave of absence then we will make that decision then. I stated it in more of a withdrawal sense but we'll see what they say.
  15. 17 points
    So ds7 took a standardised reading test and got a result that surprised me as he’s a pretty good reader for age. I went through the questions with him to figure out what happened. He said “what? I didn’t know we were meant to read the paragraphs” lol... no it’s called a reading test because you don’t have to read it! I think his reading is fine but we might need to do a bit more logic!
  16. 16 points
    I find it incredibly sad that we can’t be happy when others kids achieve a goal they have worked hard for.
  17. 15 points
    But SO SO worth it. For us, there has been NO better therapy for our feeding issues. I committed a few weeks ago. I have been doing it off an on, but about 4 or 5 weeks ago, I fully committed to each kid, one day a week, full dinner meal that they have to select and cook themselves. I made them select a grain (rice or biscuits or bread or noodles, something like that) and a veggie or fruit, and a meat/main dish. DD10 has introduced us to new vegetables. Brussel sprouts. Apparently, my DH loves brussel sprouts. I had no idea. My DH doesn't really do most veggies. I mean he *will* eat vegetables, but he's very much a meat and potatoes guy. And apparently brussel sprouts too lo. We also tried asparagus. That was really still a no go for everyone. But hey, we tried it! DD8 has been trying seafood. Fish and shrimp. Seafood can be a bit more expensive here in the midwest than it is on the coasts, but I try to have at least one seafood meal a week. And I love that DD8 is trying it. DS6 is starting to realize that fruit tastes good. I posted about his canteloupe experience. As long as he takes little bites with it, canteloupe is no problem for him. Yesterday, I mentioned to DD10 that I had some strawberries if she wanted them with lunch. DS6 turned around all curious..."Strawberries?" I said, sure, you want to try one? He was TOTALLY game. He said it smells like candy, and when he licked it, it tasted like juice. (I said, yes, that's one way they make juice lol....he will drink most straight fruit juices.) His first bit it was a bit big and he gagged, but when I asked if he wanted to try again, he took a very small bite and was fine with it. He nibbled on that for a few minutes before he decided he was done, but after that initial gag, there was no other reaction. And academically, DD10 is getting so much faster at doing calculations in her head, at least in part. I, um............don't have a full set of measuring cups lol. She's getting pretty good at knowing how much of which fraction cup is needed to make up what the recipe calls for lol. She's my reading hater, but she doesn't fight reading a recipe. And DD8 and DS6 are also reading recipes to me. AND............um..............first aid. We have had a mishap or two lol. Because there are 3 of them, this is 3 nights a week, every week, in addition to regular school. And some nights, I look at the menu and just go..............ugh............do I have to make this with them? Can't I just toss it in the oven myself and be done. And I will admit sometimes, I do make an executive decision and decide on something easier. (sometimes the plan decides for me.....it's hard to make paprika chicken after you find out that your DH used ALL the paprika when he grilled the other day lol.) And then, *something* happens each time, that reminds me exactly why I made this commitment and it's really working. Tonight it was DS6 and I making glazed ham steaks with pineapple rings. He *LOVES* ham. I opened the can of pineapple and again he was like..."smells like candy." I gave him a piece of a pineapple ring and he smelled it, then just up and popped it into his mouth! I was speechless! I handed him another piece to see if it would happen again......and it did! Until the canteloupe thing, he ate NO produce regularly, and even now, he only takes the canteloupe in small doses. But I think next week I am going to buy some fruit cups and see what happens!
  18. 15 points
    Am I the only one who thinks we need a pinned thread called the "Quotable Rosie"?
  19. 14 points
    Like the OP, I find the notion of cultural appropriation confusing. I've been to many cultural festivals - Greek, Chinese, Polish, Japanese (the town I grew up in had a huge Obon festival every year and I attended many times, despite not being at all Japanese). People are encouraged to eat the food, learn how to cook the food - I've bought a few cookbooks at festivals such like this - buy the traditional clothing, enjoy the dancing and even partake of dancing lessons... people are not turned away because they are from a different culture. In my experience, people are more than happy to share their culture. I loved this line from the linked article: A strong argument can be made, after all, that stigmatizing the sharing of cultural elements only creates more distance between us. Of course there are ignorant people who will be disrespectful, but (again) in my experience, those people are in the minority.
  20. 14 points
  21. 14 points
    Then they are likely as mistaken in that belief as public bakers who refuse to make wedding cakes for gay couples and public employees who refuse to issue marriage certificates. They are playing God and imposing their beliefs and standards on others who may believe differently about an issue that causes no harm to anyone. And acting like doing it is condoning or participating or enabling the marriage, when it is not. And I’m sure feeling morally superior at the same time. They should probably worry more about their own sins and shortcomings and less about those of others. Of course if you are being invited to rob a bank or murder someone with your adult child, then obviously they shouldn’t be mad or surprised when you refuse.
  22. 13 points
    Affect mood? Sure. Cause clinical depression? No. Definitely not.
  23. 13 points
    Have read the whole thread: I like big family weddings, but I am increasingly convinced that people put far too much emphasis on this stuff. Not just spending a lot of money or other silly things, but the idea that this is your one big day, and that if someone, even your mom, can't come because of religious convictions, it is ruined, your relationship is ruined. If you really want someone there, you make it possible for them to attend, you find a way. And if you really, really can't, you say, oh well. It's one day. We plan to be married for a lifetime, there will be plenty of times for mom to show her support. Somehow we have come to this social approach that says that people have to affirm us, like we think we will melt if they don't.
  24. 13 points
    Same here. If cake will be served afterward, I will be there. 😉
  25. 13 points
    I have to say I am so impressed with her for listening to her body, and her soul. So many people don't learn self care until they are in their 40s and having a breakdown, mid divorce, etc etc. She's getting those life skills now. So bravo to her. Make sure she knows how cool that is.
  26. 13 points
    We met JoJo's mom and Jo today!
  27. 12 points
    I think he should move out ASAP. I feel for you. I have an angry (with me) 20 year old son. He moved out recently, and that’s a very good thing. I love him, but I don’t miss him living here. When he’s not angry, ready to follow our house rules, and not miserable to be around, I’d welcome him back if he needed/wanted to be here. But, I hope he never needs to move back, because I think he just needs independence from me and living with me = failure in his mind, which makes him mad, and me miserable. So, I’d suggest moving up the move out timeline.
  28. 12 points
    Well, if even your ex-husband is going to bat for you on this, I think we can all assume that whatever happened, you are not the one at fault here. I hope your ex can talk some sense into your son. Sending you lots of hugs.
  29. 12 points
    Now, I'm a diehard atheist, and yet I think SCOTUS is right on this point. If they allow student run clubs, they need to allow ALL student run clubs - including the Christian club, and PFLAG, and the Young Republicans, and the Secular Student Alliance, and the Satanist Association. Equal access. With that said, churches should pay taxes. Or, if we're going to call them exempt, then they need to do all the paperwork that real non-profits do, and never engage in politics from the pulpit.
  30. 12 points
    I really want to strongly second Peter Pan's words about praise and it's core importance. In general, all the language you're using here is very negative. I don't how how it actually plays out with the kids in reality, but it feels extremely punitive. When kids are struggling with various things, sometimes there have to be negative consequences, I get that. But it seems like there's not enough recognition here that they are struggling. If there are issues at play, it's harder for them than other kids. In general, even when there aren't diagnosable issues, I don't think kids want to be "bad." They want to be loved. They want to be seen. All of this takes support. So when my kids were "misbehaving" that's always how I tried to approach it. You said praise only sometimes works. But praise is not something with a payoff that happens in the moment. You don't praise a kid and then he turns around and doesn't steal the cookie he wants or grab his sister's work to ball up because he feels like it. First of all, his failure to control impulses like those are not a moral failing. They're things he's struggling with that you and he have to work out systems for together. But secondly, praise is something with a payoff that happens over an incredibly slow period of time. It happens over months, not during the day in which you use it. It happens over a child's life, not on the day when you need them to stop screaming at the top of their lungs at everyone. And it doesn't lead to a kid stopping. Because if he has impulses or other behaviors that are hard to control, then they're still going to be hard to control for him. It's just that you're creating a new pathway. A lot of the time, especially at first, a kid won't choose the new path. The old one is easier. You're making a possibility of better behavior for the future.
  31. 12 points
    Since many of us like to bag on the MLM’s I had to share this. https://babylonbee.com/news/new-female-version-of-monopoly-has-you-recruit-your-friends-into-a-pyramid-scheme
  32. 12 points
    whining and complaining! No drama! In fact, DD10 is actually smiling! And there aren't a million questions about what we are going to do when school is over! And work is actually getting accomplished in a timely manner! In fact, DS6 is already done with seatwork for the day! Who are these people and what have they done with my real children?
  33. 12 points
    Just swinging by to say hi!!! So glad to see y'all are still here going strong, lol! I haven't been on WTM in over a year, I think it's been, but needed some curriculum recommendations and what better place to ask? I mean seriously?! My oldest boy begins prepping for high school this year. I can't even believe it. Anyways, hope you all are well! I'd promise to come around more often but...life has me hopping! Much love to you all!!! ❤️❤️ Edited because...WHAT?! Drive by post AND it's a BOO-YAH!!!!!! It's a drive-by BOO-YAH! ❤️
  34. 12 points
    So the other night I was having a very serious convo with DH about how the stress of 7 littles and everything that goes with it was getting to me and that I needed to develop a hobby and/or make time for myself somehow. He said, somehow with a straight face and didn't know he should duck for cover, "Isn't homeschooling a hobby?" I almost popped him in the face. But I managed to calmly say, "That's a job, not a hobby." DH is still unaware of how close he came to death that night. I do sometimes fantasize about what my life would be like if I put all my kids in school. I'd have 2 at home all day. JUST TWO!! It is funny to look back on how "hard" I thought things were before. And it was hard when I had lots of little babies and I didn't know what I was doing. But now, when even just a few of them are gone, it feels so much easier. My very favorite weekend of the year is when DH takes the boys camping and leaves me with the girls and a baby. It's almost a vacation.
  35. 11 points
    I know that people are young at 22, but by then I’d been married for 3 years and a homeowner for 1 and had held down a full time job for 5 years. So, on one hand, yes, he’s young. And on the other, he’s a full-fledged adult. There’s a bit of tension at that age about how adult we all are. I was doing all those adult things and handling them (showing up on time, etc.) but I also remember a number of jerk-moves I pulled. I remember one time that I was going to give away my piano. A mother contacted me and we set up a date for her to get it. But then she forgot the date and didn’t show. She called and asked for a new date and I flat out refused. I was so offended that she wasn’t reliable that I said, “No. You can’t have it now because you left me hanging.” She said, “But my kids were looking forward to it! I can’t afford to buy one!” And I stood my ground and was proud of myself because I wasn’t going to suffer a fool who couldn’t show up to her appointments. Oh, what a jerk I was! I can assure you, I would never in a billion years do that now. I would absolutely hate being around my 22 year old self. I can barely believe I’m the same person today. I mean, what a rotten, judgy jerky-jerk I was. Just mean. If my mother had had a board like this and found out I did that, she’d have been on the board despairing of her horrid daughter. Again, I can assure you I’m about as opposite of that now as you can be. I did finally grow up which happened after marriage and house and full-time job. I’ve had very unflattering feelings/thoughts about my sons from time to time. I’ve noticed issues in their character that I feel a burden to try to correct. However, mine are 14 and 17, so it’s still my “job” to try to correct them, or at least provide strong guidance. If they were 22, I don’t know if I’d have a chance to try to help or not. When I was around 22 and horrible to that piano woman, I’m not sure anyone could have convinced me I was wrong. She was clearly wrong (I thought at the time), because people are supposed to be good for their word and she wasn’t. (That was my thought process—very black and white and no mercy.) So, I understand why the OP would say the harsh words. Sometimes the observations the parent has are just true. But at the same time, that has to be balanced out with not forgetting all the very, very good qualities of the person. Sometimes when it’s our job to zero in on the problem areas and clean them up, that’s all we can see and we forget the good qualities. I mean, my mother never knew how I treated that piano woman, but I’m sure she’d have been aghast that she’d raised a person who could be such a jerk and for a bit of time afterwards, I don’t think she’d have felt lovey-dovey around me. I think she’d have looked at me every time we were together thinking, “What a jerk person I raised! Why was she so mean to that poor woman?” OP, I’d be pretty upset. But I do think it’ll blow over. I think in a few months you’ll still be a little hurt, but not to the point of wanting to cry and feeling as raw as you do now. And you have all learned lessons. You might have to back off a bit from him and let him grow a bit more on his own.
  36. 11 points
    Is the same son whose girlfriend broke up with him and he has to see her every day in school? And who has a very heavy homework load and is applying to colleges? If so, I think those things might have lots more to do with feeling depressed than bedroom color, although I’m not totally discounting that it could be a minor contributing factor, depending on how much waking time he spends there. Is he getting enough outdoor time, exercise, and sleep? Eating a healthy diet? Socializing with friends? If not, I’d work on those things first before changing room color. Although if it doesn’t cost much, it might be a fun project for him.
  37. 11 points
    I'm now back from the snack aisle of the store. I actually am not crazy about the hot ones. But I love the jalapeno ones.
  38. 11 points
    Because if you don't agree with them on that belief and it effects your relationship with them than it can be incredibly heartbreaking to realize that the relationship with your parent will be changing. It is completely natural to be angry when something like that effects you personally for the first time
  39. 11 points
    For me, yes. The relationship is the important thing here. They know your beliefs. But they aren't accountable to you for their beliefs - they are to God or to their own sense of self in the case of someone who doesn't believe in God. I only see the parents as being responsible for enforcing beliefs corporately as a family while children are under-age. So I can retain my beliefs and still show grace and tolerance (not compromise) in my relationships. But for me, attending events with someone that doesn't require participation is not equivalent to participating in something I am morally opposed to. (Now gong to a KKK rally which I would be morally opposed to would be equivalent because my being there at all is a form of participation.)
  40. 11 points
    That is quite the claim. Is this a war of the gods then--if your religion is the True one that will be manifest through divine providence of a meeting space and all other religions will wilt for lack of such providence? Students organizing a religious based club during lunch or after school within a school facility is no more state sponsorship of religion than students organizing a club for atheists in the same circumstances is state sponsorship of atheism. Principles of separation of church and state were never meant to prevent religious activity within publicly funded spaces; as long as rules for club organization and space use are fair and evenly applied there is no state preference for or against religion or imposition of religion at work. Your morality is your own, neither a legal mandate nor universally applicable to all Christians.
  41. 11 points
    I feel like I can share what my kids are doing without making it a brag fest. I don't feel like it is necessary to tell others what the SAT test score was unless it is a very close relative. Otherwise, a "he did well" seems to be just as good a way of celebrating it as anything if someone actually asks how he did. With close friends and relatives, they know the good and the bad even about my gifted kids. I can guarantee you that even gifted kids have things that they are struggling with - even if it is a crappy attitude.
  42. 11 points
    Off topic. Found this on DH's phone. #postedforthelikes
  43. 11 points
    You know, when I was young I'd hear about societies where they sent the mensturating women to go live by themselves during that time of the month, in a separate hut, and I thought that was terrible. Now I'm like wait..i could just go hang out with other women and bitch about PMS and not have to cook or clean for a few days? Sign me up.
  44. 11 points
    For the record, I share your modesty standards. However—your daughter is correct. Those shorts are actually on the longer side of what I’ve seen girls wearing in gym class when I’ve subbed. I don’t have a solution for you, but I suspect as she heads into high school this is going to be a bigger and bigger problem. It might be beneficial for you to take a trip to the mall or other teen hangouts and notice what the girls are wearing and the clothes they are buying; it may give you a heads up and you can begin to think about what a good compromise for your family will be. Because honestly, so far your daughter has been correct in her assertions about what the other girls her age are wearing.
  45. 11 points
    Dawn, yikes on the parents already fussing before even getting there.....eek. People are so grouchy these days. Selkie, have fun at Comic Con! That will be a fun day, at least for the kids. I hope you enjoy it as well! Today I go pick up my college boy (DS18) and bring him home for the weekend. He's not got his driver's license yet (and wouldn't have a car anyway, so...) so we're his ride. I'll go rab him after his last class, around noon. While there I have to make him go to the bookstore and pick up the access code for one of his books, then come home. Before I go, do school with DS14. When I get home and the boys are hanging out, tidy up the upstairs, clean bathrooms & vacuum for DH,and have DS21 do whatever laundry/packing he needs to do before we take him to school tomorrow. Still not showing on his payment portal, so fingers crossed we get up there and it's the right floor plan, right amount, etc. and no glitches. He got a text (??? how????) from someone saying they're his roommate, but not sure how the roommate got that info??? (maybe have him check his portal and see if his shows this person....). Maybe also do school prep for Monday, today, rather than Sunday, but that's optional.
  46. 10 points
    I took what she said to mean that she would go forward...because what other choice is there? Of course it would break a parent's heart to have a child cut off contact. But if I child did--and it wasn't the parent's fault--that parent still has to be able to build some kind of satisfying life despite the heartbreak. Doesn't mean it doesn't hurt every day.
  47. 10 points
    whatever she can fit. Honestly, writing a card or entire sheet is a brilliant way to encourage synthesis and analysis of information. In college, we were allowed one letter size sheet in our physics classes, with anything we wanted on it. We spent a lot of time constructing our sheets, and it was the most valuable way to review and study.
  48. 10 points
    So, when asked what the kids are up to, we're supposed to lie? I want to know what kids are doing--just today I was pleased to see a girl who swam with my oldest is the new ps nurse. Good for her. I'm glad the paper ran an article on her. It would have been a pretty boring paper today if they hadn't run the list of people who ran the triathlon, started a new business, got a tackle in the football game, and served their community by hauling off junk. Again, why can't we celebrate ALL achievements?
  49. 10 points
    So much to unpack here. PreK and K teachers shouldn't have anybody struggling to stay on task. It's not developmentally appropriate to have them do something alone for a pre-determined amount of time. Look at a Montessori classroom. The students have specific, guided lessons, and a work period where they choose the length of time on any activity to work. It's a quiet, calm setting that allows a child to develop that skill. A classroom, where students are told to work on X for Y time and sit when done is not developmentally appropriate. 2nd graders don't work independently for the most part. It doesn't matter that you have two other kids or a baby on the way. That has nothing to do with the 2nd grader and their development. 2nd graders are still small children. They watch, they observe, they listen, they act. If you think that it's an appropriate request to ask a 2nd grader to filter out all the "distraction", you're not thinking about what is appropriate. They watch, they observe, they listen, and they act. You need to remove the things to watch, the scenes they are observing, the things they are listening to, if you want to focus on the action. Your best bet is to work with each child independently. Do the 2nd grader's work with her. Do the Kinder's work with her. Don't expect one to keep working alone. Save that for later. Work on the building blocks of the routine you want. You want her to do the practice problems. Minimize the distractions (naptime?) and sit with her. I tend to wean kids off of attention. I'm all over it at the beginning. Every step, every problem, everything is talked through with my full attention. Slowly it moves to just introducing the problem and checking it. Then every other. Then a whole row. And we stay there for a few years, sometimes giving them space for the whole page, but not too often because I need to catch mistakes as they happen. I'm not looking to provide a public school education, where I'm not sure what an individual kid is grasping or have to work on something longer because I'm not catching problems from the start.
  50. 10 points
    Ten is very young for 7th grade. Is it possible that her age is making her feel increasingly self conscious at an already incredibly self conscious period of life? I think this is pretty normal. I get that it's aggravating, but I'm not sure there's a whole lot you can really do. It's pretty developmental.
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