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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/25/2021 in all areas

  1. One night only, but it's a beginning!!!! Day 1 - I hiked just over 9 miles to campsite where I set up my tent, filtered water, made supper, and went to bed by 8pm. I didn't sleep well since I still don't have a better pillow, but I used a stuff sack with my extra clothes (in addition to my crappy pillow) plus it was chillier than I anticipated. But, my sleeping pad was much more comfy on the ground and with a bit less air! I am still very interested in the ZenBivy system though.... Day 2 - I actually slept a little later than I planned (Isn't that the way? Don't sleep all night, but come 5:30am - sound asleep!) and got on the trail shortly after 8:30. I hiked just over 4 miles and waited for the shuttle I had arranged to take me back to my car. I hiked pretty much by myself both days and at the campsite an older gentleman set up his hammock a bit away from my tent and there were a bunch of other people set up a ways up the trail. Everyone had to walk by me to get to the water source, so they all knew I was there, but I think the older gentleman was worried about me being on my own - he and I had chatted at an overlook for 10-15 minutes about 3 miles before the campsite. Anyway, it was nice he was there, but I felt totally safe before he set up. Everyone I spoke to on the trail was nice, chatty, and easy going. I can't wait to do it again - hopefully for 2-3 nights next time.
    30 points
  2. re lessons from the chicken coop, a True Story So, COVID transformed my husband -- I truly cannot convey just how implausible this really is -- into chicken farming. He decided (this is more than a year ago now) that he wouldn't start with chicks, but rather with "pullets." Pullets, you probably know (we did not) are ~puberty-age~ chickens, not old enough to lay but old enough to reliably sex-sort. He went this route partly because our town zoning allows chickens but not roosters, and partly because he wanted to fast-forward the timeline to getting to eggs; but mostly because we have a sensitive animal-loving vegetarian peacenik daughter who could not tolerate the, er, disposition of chicks that turned out to be roosters. So. We have absolutely no idea what we're doing (I cannot emphasize this point strongly enough) but we get the pullets, six of them, and manage to ensconce them into the three-story deluxe Chicken Condo Complex/Fort Knox Yard that he spent the first two months of lockdown designing and ordering materials to be delivered and constructing and revising. And it takes them a couple days before they work out how to come down the gangplank, and another couple days before they stopped freaking out every time a hawk circled overhead and trusted the Fort Knox roof over their yard... and started -- as you say -- working out their "pecking order." Animal-loving vegetarian peacenik, who like all of us had oodles of unexpected time on her hands, ensconced herself in an Adirondack chair in front of Fort Knox and watched them for hours on end, and came up with what ultimately became their names (Henriegga, Eggsmerelda, Stregga Nona, Eggwina, Gregg.... And Peggy) after roundly rejecting my husband's proposal (I can't remember exactly, but along the lines of Cacciatore, Korma, General Tso, etc). Gregg? we asked. Non-binary, she replied. After about a week of pullet observation, it became clear that Gregg was at the top of the "pecking order," and And Peggy was at the bottom. And then, after a few more weeks... all of us except my husband began to suspect, at first secretly/ individually/ separately, and then we began discussing it, that Gregg was maybe a rooster. Now. The pullets had been professionally sex-sorted, by actual chicken-raising professionals, in an actual chicken-raising farm. And not a one of us had *any* kind of husbandry experience, nor *any* kind of visual cue to point to. The sole data we each had noted, independently, was behavioral: Gregg acted -- there really is no other way to put this -- like.a.d!ck. But my husband, upon consulting the Interwebs, reported that female chickens at the top of the "pecking order" sometimes do act like d!cks; and dismissed the idea entirely. And the rest of us doubted our judgment, because -- I really cannot emphasize this enough -- we had absolutely no idea what we were doing, even less than my husband, who at least was consulting the Interwebs for hours on end on every possible aspect of husbandry. Who were we, to second-guess the discernment of professionals? And none of them were laying yet, so we had no real method of experimentation. Weeks crawled by, for us, for our unseen loved ones, for the locked down nation, for the Fort Knox in our backyard. The "pecking order" calcified. Animal-loving vegetarian peacenik grew increasingly distressed about the plight of And Peggy, whom she became convinced was malnourished and not growing properly, and for whom she began to contrive ways of supplemental feeding such that Gregg the Non-Binary Acts Like a D!ck could not prevent. I have foreshadowed this so beautifully, you may suspect where we're headed here. One early morning, as I sat outside musing in my Gratitude Journal (another COVID-driven new practice), I heard, behind me, unmistakable crowing. Now. Six chickens, behind me: there was no way for me to know which one it came from. Except: I knew. Husband consulted the Interwebs and reported that sometimes, female chickens make squawking sounds that kinda-sorta sound like crowing, to amateurs (like me, was the obvious implication) who can't tell the difference. I waited. Animal-loving vegetarian peacenik continued to sneak And Peggy supplemental feedings. A week or two later, as she sat in her Adirondack chair fretting over And Peggy's still-small frame, Gregg crowed again, just after bullying Eggsmerelda off a slug she'd found in the Fort Knox yard. My husband repeated his Interwebs insight that hens sometimes squawk in ways that kinda sound like crowing... but somewhat less emphatically, this time. The third time Gregg crowed, just after pouncing on Stregga Nona who was calmly rifling through the dirt wholly minding her own business, husband was *right there* and could no longer remain in denial. [Town zoning laws re roosters are clear, so now we had a new problem. There were a variety of logistically easier alternatives, but given concerns of animal-loving vegetarian peacenik we ended up boxing Gregg up and driving him some distance, back to the pullet farm from which we'd obtained him, where they run a Rooster Retirement Home where he'll definitely live out a long life in contented peace.] And you'll never guess what happened next. Just as soon as Gregg was gone -- literally, within hours -- the other five chickens began behaving differently. It took a while before we (ALVP as the lead observer here, from her Adirondack chair) could articulate the difference. ALVP said the nervous energy dropped precipitously: the remaining five chickens were markedly less stressed. Over the next few weeks... the "pecking order" disappeared. Truly. Some mornings, after the solar-operated automatic door opens, Eggsmerelda is the first one out; other days, Eggwina; others Stregga Nona. We scatter vegetable scraps around Fort Knox, they each calmly head to different corners. When one of them finds a slug, the others might cluster around with interest, but no one swoops in to steal it. And Peggy, I'm happy to report, and to ALVP's great satisfaction, has put on weight and has now achieved the same size as the others. A full year later, there really isn't a "pecking order" any more. ALVP attributes this to the absence of a rooster... and based on the vast experience of one coop with one d!ck-y rooster, I'm inclined to agree. Five chickens, 4 or 5 eggs a day. ALVP attributes their productivity to their small-brained mental health. (Husband OTOH attributes it to his newfound husbandry skills, and also the spaciousness of Fort Knox.) And they all lived happily ever after, The End.
    20 points
  3. Agreed. My son has come to this conclusion. He has been in a drama group of 6 kids for about 5 years (he is the only homeschooler), and at this point he is the only straight cis male. To him, his friends all seem to try to outdo each other with their labels, which seem to change year to year. He has been profoundly influenced by these interactions and his best friend's experience of medical transitioning that he has done a LOT of thinking on the issue. He chose last year to do an entire half credit course on conformity. We read textbooks, learned about norms, how they are enforced both internally and externally, watched movies, read novels, did lots of discussion about the causes and consequences of conformity. And this class culminated with a comparison of the different types of conformity found in three of Jane Austen's novels and how they were enforced through internal and external means. But then he concluded with conformity we see today. He feels like conformity today is about being different. That to be cool and popular in his group, you must not be the same as the others, rather you have to be as different as possible, which is totally opposite to the conformity of the Austen era. Today, being different is how you conform to his generation's social norms.
    16 points
  4. Edited to remove personal details. I have told all the kids that I am close enough to for them to discuss it with me that I will use their preferred names and pronouns, but I do not support physical transitioning until they're done with college and have made it through puberty, and that I am not going to listen to them demonizing their parents for not supporting doing so now. And I'm kind of hoping that by the time they get through college, they'll have decided that gender isn't quite as big of a problem as they think it is now. I tell my students that I will call them what they wish to be called, and that includes the kids who come in wearing their superhero shirt and want to be called "Batman", but be aware that once I get used to calling you X, I'm probably not going to remember to call you Y at the recital. So, if you go by Batman in lessons regularly, I am likely to introduce you as Batman.
    14 points
  5. Sentenced to 270 months (22.5 years.)
    13 points
  6. I don't know if I'd try to dissuade them, but I would definitely keep engaging them in questioning these ideas. "But why??? Tell me why you think that math is only for girls". Lead them down a path where they will trip over their own faulty logic. 😄
    12 points
  7. The problem that I saw was that we were using really really bad methods for teaching both and expecting increased time and increased assessment to lead to improvements. If you do a phonics first approach with everyone, yes, there will be some kids who don't need it, and some for whom it isn't enough, but about 75% will learn to read better this way, and learning disabilities, vision disturbances, and the like will show up more clearly and can be remediated more clearly (and those that need to move faster and are already independent readers can usually benefit from phonics for spelling). Similarly, if you do a sequential math program in elementary (something like Singapore math), you'll likely catch most kids, and figure out who needs to move faster or needs a different approach. Get those basics solid, and coupled with lots of time to explore in early childhood, and you then can use those skills down the road.
    11 points
  8. I don’t know what to say about sorting through it, but my 10yo is pretty weird. He recently told us that he wants to be a dad “that just cooks and works out.” His dad does neither, lol. Kids definitely like to categorize things. My four youngest put themselves into teams when they were younger. I might have assumed girls v boys, especially given birth order, but they were blonds and browns. Sometimes phrased lights and darks. 😬
    11 points
  9. It was fascinating. We did about 10 hours per week for 15 weeks so about 150 hours -- so we covered a lot of content. We started with Jane Austen movies, and we talked and talked and talked. Then, we started researching both discussions of conformity in published article about Austen's novels, and then psychological textbooks and articles on the internet about conformity in general. Our readings simply developed out of our questions, so I have no idea what sources we used. Then, we picked movies like The Wave and novels like Lord of the Flies, and discussed them and wrote about them, honing our ability to analyze conformity. We ended with the comparison of what drove the conformity of the protagonists of Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Persuasion, and Jane Eyre. We started the project during our 7 week intense lockdown, so the whole family was involved as my older had returned from Boston. It was a wonderful effort, and powerfully useful for navigating life in today's teen world.
    11 points
  10. First off, you don’t know it was an entire year of explicit anti-racist teaching. As you said earlier ‘it sounds like’ …to YOU. That’s your own speculation. Second of all, black parents are and have been homeschooling in increasing numbers to protect their kids from racist SYSTEMS that you object to students learning about or discussing in school. CRT bans in teacher education and training explicitly prohibit the consideration of disparate treatment and outcomes so teachers can remain ignorant of the ways in which they criminalize and pathologize differences. What these parents are complaining about are paternalistic attitudes that presume violence, stupidity, and parental apathy. It’s the same paternalism you’re using to presume that these complaints mean black parents haven’t already had skin in the game and/or don’t value the CRT lens. Oh, contraire, they’re largely using CRT at home to inform and empower their students, to build them up with stories about black success and white efforts to thwart it, how the country is run as one big game built for others, what the rules are, and how they can play to win. All of that is in ADDITION to reading, writing, and arithmetic. This isn’t evidence of the drawbacks of CRT. It’s evidence of the way that lens fortifies students against the onslaught of daily life and the ongoing ignorance and blindness of a primarily white teacher corps that doesn’t understand the kids they teach or the families they come from. The curriculum and study choices black homeschooling parents make are often focused on affirmation and support, encouragement, dignity, history (the parts that don’t show the US in the best light), and triumph over adversity. That focus is exactly what is being banned. Add in the forced ‘patriotism’ crap and there will be even more of an exodus. And lest anyone think I’m saying this to be mean or just for shits and giggles… https://www.google.com/amp/s/theconversation.com/amp/black-americans-homeschool-for-different-reasons-than-whites-137554 https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/06/21/the-rise-of-black-homeschooling/amp https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theatlantic.com/amp/article/385543/ https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.pbs.org/newshour/amp/show/black-families-increasingly-choose-to-homeschool-kids More ignorance on the part of teachers and administrators is sure to help. Yep. Surely. Black parents homeschool to protect their kids from racism. To strengthen them before subjecting them to it, not to ignore it, but to confront it fully armed with facts. Using this increase to suggest that we should double down on the ignorance that got us to this point is really rich.
    11 points
  11. This deserves to be published. Loved every word.
    10 points
  12. When my oldest was 4 he believed that children had penises and no breasts and adults had breasts and no penises. This came up when he made a comment about "when he's big enough to wear a bra". I realized that he'd seen lots of naked women at the locker room at the pool, and lots of little boys peeing in the boys room at school and put this together.
    10 points
  13. Okay, these are some of my unformed thoughts jumping off of this: We as humans seem to feel safer with order and stability. We like categories, because it helps us filter and feel like we can understand something of this vast and complex world. One way we create this order is social norms. Sexual reproduction is an obvious touch point, because it effects how a person will move through the world - especially historically, pre effective birth control. Some of those norms were good/neutral/bad/we don't really know. Modern life has become increasingly unmoored. Kind of a baby/bathwater situation. We tried to get rid of the harmful norms, we created a vacuum. Kids are more anxious and have more confused senses of self. Kind of like decision fatigue, before they've even started the day. The vacuum will be filled. What is the modern teen's world norms? Online, avatars, filters, likes, p0rn, youth, and labels for everything. You're not a person who's interested in x, y, z, you're an x, y, z-er! The categories haven't gone away, they've multiplied, and why would you choose the boring box that your mum is in when you could be interesting! I'm not at all saying we should go back to harmful trad norms. I quite prefer living as a modern woman! But what some of us are trying to point out is that the new labels are just as restrictive as the old ones, just as ferociously fought over (have you seen a bisexual vs pansexual fight?!). Except now they're based almost entirely on the feelings of teenagers, and to try to claw them back to the material world is 'unkind.' None of this would necessarily be a problem if the grown ups in the room kept their heads. Define your terms before writing them into law, mammalian sexual dimorphic reproduction exists and matters, medical transition is not neutral and should have a level of gatekeeping... Eta - ksera's post below reminded me where I was going with this... Identity. Building an identity from scratch, with no input from social nor biological parameters, is frightening! Where on earth would you start?
    10 points
  14. I find it incredibly depressing that we just give up. And then embrace a form of progress that sees life-long medication and complex, serious surgeries as a path to liberation. That's just madness to me. Social insanity.
    10 points
  15. I don't think the happiness of the parents will depend primarily on the implementation. I think it will have more to do with the views of the parents themselves. You could have a really well done program, but there is a LARGE segment of parents who are going to be upset if the program is mentioning any racial injustices as having happened at the hands of white people, and especially any suggestion that it is still happening today. I'm guessing it's easier for parents of kids unlikely to be targeted by any such groups to think campus should be open for anyone and everyone to be given a platform for whatever hate speech they want to spout. I expect there are scenarios I could set up that would suddenly give parents pause, if they thought their kid would be at risk. As a parent of a kid in a targeted group, this thread has given me new things to worry about next year. This post makes me regret ever even questioning OS's post about "all white people say racist things when they think no one is listening." I still don't think it's true that all white people do that, as I'm very sensitive to that and notice it when it does happen (which is not infrequent), but I also think some of the biggest offenders are likely those who don't think it's true, who wouldn't know it if they saw it and are actively participating in it themselves. I think this post in an illustration of why CRT specifically has a place to be taught at some point. To not have an understanding that violence and fear really hasn't been equal for all races is kind of the point.
    9 points
  16. So, the thing is that their stereotypes don't match the people in their limited social circle. Like the cooking thing. There are 4 people in our family who like to cook, and pursue cooking as a hobby and not just a way to feed the family. 2 of us are female. Their aunt, who loves high heels, make up, jewelry, and crushing people on the basketball court, is the best chef in the family. But they don't look at her and think "auntie likes to cook, maybe cooking is for girls too". They look at her and think "well clearly she's not on the girl team". My experience also tells me that when my kid encounters the outside world, his ideas will win. For example, he decided that he wanted to take Algebra 1 next year. Usually sixth graders aren't allowed to take Algebra 1, so I made an appointment for him with the Assistant Principal at his new school to argue his case. AP said "So you like math huh?" and my son said "No, I don't like math, math is boring." AP said "But you think you're ready for Algebra? How did you get ready for Algebra?" and my son said "Well there was a pandemic (paused and looked at the guy's face like he wasn't sure if he had to explain the concept?) and that was REALLY boring, so I had to do something. And so I did a lot of math, and I finished some grades, and now I don't want to do those grades again because that would be even boring-er." I was sitting there thinking this had to be the worst argument ever, but the AP was like "well you've made a compelling argument. I will make an exception. You can take Algebra." as if he'd said "these are not the droids you're looking for." So, I'm guessing that once we release him back into the wild, the entire world will quickly decide that cooking is only for boys and other people who like boy things.
    9 points
  17. It’s hard to get especially worked up about someone losing a speaking engagement when the rhetoric and behavior on that side of the debate is physically endangering real people, right now.
    9 points
  18. What the teacher said was that she used inquiry based learning in social studies all year. This was an example of how she used inquiry based learning to discuss anti racism and was done several months into the school year. It was actually an interesting way to get into the Colonial period for a diverse student population. So no, anti racism didn’t take the place of social studies.
    9 points
  19. We have one very gender nonconforming kid in the mix, and we used to have two. None of the kids seem fazed by that. My SIL, the mother of the 3 younger girls, is expecting a boy. The two teams are planning how they will recruit him. There doesn't seem to be any sense that the boys team (which is 25-50% girl*) might have a head start. So, there's this weird mix of sexism, and freedom. *exact percentage is debatable as some of the adults are hard to assign. For example, Pop, their great grandfather, likes to have tea parties with the members of the girls team and their dolls. This might be a girl activity, which would get him booted to team Human, since he also likes to watch ice hockey and thus can't be on team girl, but my son argues that when Pop is smiling broadly and pouring tea for the dollies he is not enjoying "playing with dolls", he's "being a family man" which is clearly a very manly activity.
    9 points
  20. I think one reason the efficacy of Pfizer against Delta looks so much lower in Israel is that, with 85% of the adult population fully vaxxed, there is no true control group, because vaccinated adults and unvaccinated children are not matched cohorts. At this point, there's really no way to know what percentage of vaccinated adults were exposed to Delta and didn't get infected, but would have gotten infected if they weren't vaxxed. And OTOH, if the UK was only picking up infections in vaccinated folks with significant symptoms, then their calculations for the efficacy rate of Pfizer vs Delta is probably too high. I think the fact that the initial symptoms with Delta are much less distinctive and more common-cold-ish is likely to make it a lot harder to collect really accurate stats on infection rates, and by extension, vaccine efficacy.
    8 points
  21. Vaccines have been shown in the UK to be effective against Delta symptomatic disease and hospitalisation. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jun/15/the-covid-delta-variant-how-effective-are-the-vaccines?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Other
    8 points
  22. Here is Pennsylvania's new bill, rolled out in response to "CRT" and covering any secondary or post-secondary institution that receives *ANY* amount of public funding (see definition of terms, lines 3-5 on page 1). It bans (pp 3-4, lines 3-29 to 4-2) any teacher from requiring (IANAL) I believe @pinball 's analysis above is correct, in that certain difficult incidents in our history, such as the Tea Party or PA's own Homestead Strike * , could still be taught through an emphasis on forms of hierarchy, such as colonialism or other forms of economic subjugation rather than the now-banned hierarchies (defined, lines 6-7 on p 1, as "one race or sex is inherently superior to another). Other historical episodes, like Dred Scott, or the Tusla Race Massacre, or Saly Demings, or the 3/5 clause in the Constitution itself -- any book or article or other learning material that references any factual historical incident that ARE based upon a "racist concept" such as slavery manifestly was -- would be banned. Even at the university level. Any university that received *any* amount public funding, which is pretty much all of them, not just Penn State or the cc system. Which would seem to be the point. Missouri's new bill, (after a nearly identical prologue of defined terms reflecting the totally organic grass roots origins of these bills sweeping the nation), gets even more succinctly to what's banned (lines 29-31, p 2): Got that? No Divisive Concepts. Even the most disingenuous Rufo-whipped Tuckermanic whackadoodle legislators driving this drivel through know, perfectly well, that this language will not stand SCOTUS scrutiny. Which suggests to me that the bills themselves... just like the Rufo-whipped CRT performance art and the "concerning" videos collected and curated by newly-sprung astroturf advocacy groups like FAIR, are not, at all, the point. (* though Homestead's use of *black scab workers* to break the strike of the union that had earlier refused them membership... or how very very common that race-based tactic was used by American businesses to suppress unions, or how that divide-and-conquer based on racial resentment tactic continues up to today to inform our inequality problem... would NOT be allowed under the ban... ... and perhaps that too IS a secondary point.)
    8 points
  23. One of the ones that sticks most clearly in my mind was the "high ability counselor" at the cover school who cautioned me against letting L take classes at the local CC because the "wrong kind of people" go to the CC, and suggested a couple of private colleges instead. I'm sure she will swear up and down that she's not racist. But it's hard to view that any other way, given that the CC is about 85% Black, and the private schools suggested are about 90% White.
    8 points
  24. I would argue that understanding a non-whitewashed version of history IS essential instruction. At least half of a student's time should be on humanities (past very early elementary, and even in early elementary, readalouds and shared experiences are accessible) and if a majority of the humanities reading materials used are designed to give a view of history, I'm OK with that. One of the biggest trends that I saw in my time teaching in public schools and in teaching teachers was that math and reading crowded out everything else, and I think we are seeing the results of that "Back to Basics" approach that focused on test scores.
    8 points
  25. Which is still very different from replacing social studies with it. She’s using that lens. It’s being embedded. So when talking about Colonial America, she doesn’t just talk about the founding fathers and how wonderful they were. She also approaches it from the point of view of other people.
    8 points
  26. Your family is so completely adorable and hilarious. I really have no advice. I would keep probing for logical fallacies, not because I was trying to improve their critical thinking skills, but because I would find the reasons so hilarious. I would also write all these things down. I wouldn't try to really dissuade them. I think that might make them double down. I love the Team Human.
    8 points
  27. re "three teams: boy, girl and human" I don't think you've yet girded your loins and sallied into the Mondo Gender Thread, but I do believe you've managed to untie its Gordian knot right there....
    8 points
  28. Logic does not work. They have an answer for any logic we throw their way, that they say with such confidence that just for a minute the rest of us feel like we must be the mistaken ones. Here's an example: Both my older nieces the 10 year old (the girl who likes boy things) and the 21 year old love lacrosse, and they have been playing a lot in the backyard with my boys. Since both of the real lacrosse players are girls and play on girls teams, they all 4 use girls' sticks and they play by the girls rules. My youngest niece asked to play and the 9 year old explained that she couldn't because lacrosse is only for boys. My oldest son said "You do realize it's called women's lacrosse right? Why would they name it women's lacrosse if it's just for boys?" my niece told him "Well, there are lots of girls who like boys things so they needed a sport to play." My son replied "Well, what about DN21?" This is when we learned that DN21 has told them that she's a "girl who likes human things". This led to a discussion of how there are three "teams" in our family -- girl, boy and human. Each member has been assigned to one. I am on team "human", because I like to cook. It turns out that many of the members of the family over the age of 10 have been assigned to team human. Meanwhile, while those two are arguing about this, my youngest son is offering his little cousin his stick, and is showing her how to hold this. At first I thought he was being sweet, but he explained that he is trying to convince her to change teams so that the boys team can "win".
    8 points
  29. 0 cases again. Waste water clear. Crossing fingers. We have 48 more hours to see if our Australian traveller has infected anyone in my city. Lockdown decision will be made on Sunday.
    8 points
  30. I strongly disagree. I would never in a million years expect a housecleaner to get rid of a dead mouse. I see in you OP that they both know you are afraid of mice, so they are being spectacularly rude to ask in the first place. Please don't feel bad about saying no. Text them both: "I won't be able to remove the dead mouse. As you know, I am afraid of mice, but, even if I weren't, I'd have to say no to dead animal removal."
    8 points
  31. Your unit on conformity sounds fascinating, lewelma! I'd love to know some of the sources you used. Yes, the complete no debate is frankly scary. We couldn't always have this discussion here, the conversation has shifted from 5 years ago. No one has called me a bigot yet! #winning That is part of what caught my attention at first, how quickly this topic became unspeakable. I have never seen anything so censored. The internet, when it first started ~back in my day *chews on straw in my rocking chair*~ was all about free speech, power to the people etc. Now it's all banning, cancelling, even fricking 4chan banned aspects of this conversation.
    8 points
  32. Your definition includes the word exclusion. Does your definition of that differ from mine? Exclusion happens both intentionally and unintentionally. Being fertile is a status. It’s exercise to the exclusion of others is a privilege. Even if we don’t agree on that, yes, it could be seen as discriminatory that adults who have suboptimal fertility do not receive medical coverage to restore or preserve their reproductive health where pregnancy is fully covered for all. Privilege and discrimination aren’t opposites. No, the idea is to TELL THE TRUTH about the origins of our current state. That truth necessitates some evaluation of the impact, past and present, of racism. That understanding is likely to lead more individuals to support changes in how and why we do the things we do and have the laws we have. It’s not a guarantee. It’s just a consequence of having more/better information about our shared story. That’s not overthrow either. It’s growth. Evolution. ETA: CRT, as currently defined on the US right, is any assertion that current outcomes/conditions are the result of racist intentions or acts from the past. CRT includes any assertion that wealth, race, or other immutable characteristic confers unearned benefits. CRT is anything even tangentially related to history that suggests America is (not just was) flawed and that living people have been harmed by those flaws. The ‘patriotism’ instructional mandates (literally, there are forced speech laws that require teachers to promote ‘patriotism’ and reveal the ‘evils’ of other governing models) are an outgrowth. The irony is that the people mandating a simplistic, one-dimensional (always up!) ‘patriotic’ education could really benefit from understanding the much more nuanced and complicated patriotism of indigenous and other minority groups who have fought, died, and bled for this country without receiving the benefits, honors, and respect they were/are owed. THAT is true patriotism.
    8 points
  33. Does anyone remember Free Willy, the movie, and the big earth day push in the 80s? I remember my sister coming home, absolutely RABID, about the need to cut the plastic around soda cans and reduce plastic bag use. Funny how exposure to those things sticks with you sometimes. We still reuse plastic bags and cut the plastic on plastic bottle six packs, etc. As a big sister, I thought she was nuts. You can’t fix a systemic problem that you can’t or won’t see and sometimes the lessons of youth really DO make a difference in how we approach problems as adults. ETA: I think the people advancing these CRT bans know that exposing kids to all kinds of unpleasantries DOES make a difference in how the kids see and approach problems later. They know that giving kids something tangible to do, like writing letters and lobbying legislatures also makes a difference. Thus, the proponents of these laws hope to break the chain between youth awareness and adult activism.
    8 points
  34. My A/C is adequate for the "normal" high temps here (high 80s and occasionally low 90s), but the next 3 days are supposed to be 106, 113, and 109, followed by another whole week of mid- to high 90s. Assuming the A/C holds out, I can probably keep the downstairs in the 80s, but it will generally only cool the upstairs by about 10 degrees — so 113* outside would be 93* in the bedrooms. I'll likely be sleeping on the couch for the next week or so. I'm also really worried about the wildlife here, given the combination of extreme heat and no rain, so I scattered containers of water around the yard for the feral cat that lives around here as well as all the squirrels, birds, raccoons, possums, and other critters.
    7 points
  35. Pam! 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂 Oh my gosh this is publishing story worthy! Someday I will have to tell you what happens when a family of total all things science nerd except Ag Science, Vet Science, Biology people decide to have decorative yard ducklings, know not what the heck they are doing, and end up with five drakes and one Female. One. Just one. D!dk doesn't even describe the behavior, and we found out just how disturbed male duck mind really is! ETA: if I ever find the jackwang that created autocorrect for Kindle, I will potentially perpetrate the first act of genuine violence of my life! (Neck/heck, frames/drakes)
    7 points
  36. @Seasider too@Lady Florida.@Pawz4me “ 4 min ago Feds sending scientists and engineers to Florida to study potential structural failures From CNN's Pete Muntean The federal government is sending a team of experts to Surfside, Florida, to see if Thursday’s condo building collapse should trigger a larger investigation that could impact building codes everywhere. Six scientists and engineers are being sent from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the little-known government agency was empowered to study building structural failures and suggest over-arching changes to building codes, fire response and emergency communications. NIST spokesperson Jennifer Huergo stressed while this team is only looking to determine if an investigation will be recommended and not the cause of the collapse, it does have subpoena power and will gather building materials that could be helpful if a full federal investigation is deemed necessary. “
    7 points
  37. It also really, really bothers me to see HBCU's listed as "Red" on the FIRE site with the reason that they don't allow free assembly. For example, Tennessee State is one such school-it is rated lower by FIRE than many schools which have explicitly restrictive policies, like Union which has been known to expel students who mention being Gay on social media. Their reason for not allowing outside protesters on campus is simple. "Protests" against civil rights turned into mobs coming on campus and beating and killing the students and faculty, because a Black college was an open target for race related rage. I cannot see it as a free speech violation to not allow outsiders access to a campus that should be a safe place, particularly not when in the past, it has proven not to be. And as a mom who is sending a kid to a residential college next year, I really, really hope campus is a safe place for the students.
    7 points
  38. Are you assuming that having at least one or more URMs is going to lead to viewpoint diversity on a board of directors? I think the law’s writers are. I don’t. It’ll probably make for more colorful photos, that’s about it, but it’s not forcing anyone to disclose their political beliefs at risk of penalty. I, personally, prefer more of a carrot approach to encouraging diversity. College students self-select for all kinds of reasons—interests, climate, race/ethnicity, whatever. You can’t mandate students to think like you or to spread themselves into evenly divided tribes of competing thought. The Florida law’s proponents explicitly state that their goal is to advance white Christian ideals. One of the bills chief lobbyists said: “I think that those of us who have diverse thinking and look at both sides of the issue, see that the way the cards are stacked in the education system, is toward the left and toward the liberal ideology and also secularism — and those were not the values that our country was founded on,” Bishop said. “And those are the values that we need to get our country back to.” Read more here: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article250470626.html#storylink=cpy State Rep. Rodrigues is also on record saying this legislation will prohibit universities from prohibiting or restricting extremist groups from gathering on state campuses, regardless of the security threat. That’s not about free speech in classrooms. It’s an attempt to make sure black students can be intimidated and threatened anytime the Proud Boys get a hankering to gather.
    7 points
  39. Thanks everyone. I am darn proud of myself! My husband is totally supportive; he wasn't too keen on it at first, but after I did a few day hikes on my own, he realized I'd be fine. He does worry, but I usually have service at the trailhead and he always knows where I'm going and when I'll be back. None of the hikes I have done are really remote either. I'll probably get a Garmin Inreach GPS eventually as I go further afield. The AT is pretty hard to get lost on, at least the parts I've travelled. It's a very well-worn path and the trail is blazed quite well. Honestly, my biggest worry is going off the trail to pee and not being able to find it again - the trees all look alike (to me - my dad and brother would be horrified by me saying that!) and it is really easy to get disoriented only a few feet from the trail! My goal is to finish hiking the PA section of it this summer, but I've got a bunch of other things on the calendar too, so we'll see! I've been wanting to do this for years, and I'm so glad I finally did. I feel fulfilled 🙂 and can't wait to go back out!
    7 points
  40. Is anyone else getting, ‘if you just complied with the hegemonic agenda, we wouldn’t have to ban you so hard’ vibes? No? Just me? Hmph.
    7 points
  41. Huh. I kinda sorta understand why that might be (knowledge of the building), but still . . . it screams conflict of interest, doesn't it?
    7 points
  42. If you're a white person and you're hearing other white people in your circle being racist on the regular, can I suggest changing your social circle? It's not normal behaviour, and hasn't been for a long time. Proclaiming one's intrinsic racism just sounds to me like religious language - we're all sinners etc.
    7 points
  43. I don't know if most white people do it, but I've definitely been in conversations where white people have said racist things with a wink or a smirk. Kinda like "You know how it is, with those people, *wink*wink*". More subtle racism has been where they keep mentioning the race of the other person when it has utterly nothing to do with the conversation. It's a way of feeling-out how the other white person feels about race without being direct and outing yourself as a blatant racist. There is a local pastor's wife that does this when she first gets to know people. She'd tell stories of when her kid was in school, and how the kid was treated by the "Mexican teacher", or how they met this really nice "Black lady" at the farmer's market. If it happened once, you might brush it off as being oddly detailed in with descriptions. But it happened over and over, to a degree that it felt like she was trying to indirectly make a point. Because she was. 😠
    7 points
  44. You’re not sure whether class time should include it but you’re not willing to listen to or consider the preferences of the parents whose children are most affected by racism? They’re literally saying, in each of the articles linked, that they want and do MORE with history and racial matters, not less. Again, paternalism. They must not know what works.
    7 points
  45. I've been reading some of the posts from this thread to my ds, and he has been astounded that we can have this conversation. He said that he simply can NOT discuss any nuance about this complex topic with his peer group. He must show support. Period. Based on his Austen paper, he stays silent (conforms to the norms) through his own internal enforcement of his behaviour which is enforced through implied threat of ostracism.
    7 points
  46. I talked specifically about ‘here’ because of the straw man issue that keeps on coming up. People HERE keep stipulating that they believe that education about racism (and sexism, BTW) is needed, people HERE have stipulated that THEY THEMSELVES TEACH IT TO THEIR CHILDREN AND OTHERS, and people HERE have said, “But some of these other ways of approaching this are wrong, and are counterproductive, and are inappropriate, and should not be done.” Honestly, if I wanted to ban teaching about racism, I’d go about it just the way that some idiotic educators appear to be doing—I’d make it so extreme and so personalized that it would be vomited up by the communities in recoil. Letting this kind of inept teaching be representative of how this is approached is counterproductive at best and actually damaging at worst. Most people in this thread are in material agreement that: 1. Racism exists 2. Racism is part of history and part of our present 3. Kids need to learn about this in age appropriate ways But if anyone questions any portion of how this is actually being taught all the sudden it’s like they are wearing confederate flags and carrying pitchforks. We can do better than this.
    6 points
  47. Yeah and it's interesting how much I hear from people who claim to be "cancelled." The so-called discrimination against conservatives in college isn't much of a real thing. There's the claim that most college professors are liberals or democrats. But does that prove discrimination? Or is it that well educated people tend to be Democrats? The Narrative of Discrimination against Conservatives in Higher Ed is Overblown
    6 points
  48. It depends. The engineer (and the company he works for) might have been summoned to aid in the investigation. Kind of like whenever there is a plane crash, the plane manufacturer would have to send their representatives to aid in the investigation.
    6 points
  49. Nope. Tell him you do pest removal for $500 per hour.
    6 points
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