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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/13/2021 in all areas

  1. Meet Buzz and Fuzz. Two feral farm kitties who appeared to be abandoned because every adult cat they approached ran away from them and no one responded to their cries of hunger, so the humans had to step in. They are named Buzz and Fuzz because one hisses every time we touch them and my Dad used to call cat hissing fuzzing. 😂 The other one meows, and we ask it "what are you buzzing for now?" I'm guessing they are about 4ish weeks, give or take a day or two, due to the shape of their ears and the ability to eat soft food. So, I am cat momma'ing for a few weeks until they are old enough to go to new homes. They get so stinky and dirty so fast, walking through their food and kitten milk!
    12 points
  2. re Structures and Systems: All in the Past, or Ongoing Today? Other posters have already spoken to aspects of this question, but to add a bit: Current housing market: researchers using "paired testing" (using pairs of people submitting applications, with all financial & other information identical except the test-category) have rather consistently found significant differences in whose applications are accepted in the apartment rental market (prior link), the home insurance market, and the mortgage market. Voter access: There are many elements of voter access beyond the discrepancies in what voter ID is accepted that you cite, and the differences in on-the-ground practice in what ID is actually demanded of whites/blacks showing up to vote that @Big Buckin' Longhorn described upthread. There have been verified instances of voter roll purges that overwhelmingly affect voters of one party or with "minority-sounding" names. There have been districts gerrymandered with what state and federal courts have deemed "surgical precision" to pack black voters densely so to dilute their impact. Vastly unequal distribution of polling stations and allocation of funding to operate them result in hours-long wait at the polls for some and breezy minutes in and out for others, a pattern that has been statistically verified by analysis of smartphone data. Education: The aftermath of Brown v BoE saw the rise of "school choice" and charter schools, which enabled a new form of segregation to arise. Even within mainline public education, there are vast disparities in per capita funding, which (in large measure as a result of how schools are funded, which I recall your mentioning yourself in another post) map neatly to the % of minorities by district. As well we've discussed pretty extensively in this thread how on-the-ground differences in expectations can yield devastating effects. Law enforcement, prosecutorial discretion, and sentencing: You didn't mention these interlocking systems and structures, but beyond the appalling one-off stories like George Floyd's, there have been extensive studies uncovering extensive racial differences at each of these stages. You are absolutely correct that correlation does not equal causation. There are three ways to evaluate such patterns. One is The Singular Heart Method: to define racism solely and singularly as an individual matter of individual "heart," such that unless there is a substantiated record of some actor along the way that specifies RACE as a criteria (as in the North Carolina gerrymander case)... any "pattern" is just coincidental. Another, related but not identical, is the Colorblind Doctrine Method: to define as a premise that racism is all in our past, and so even to LOOK for race-based patterns is, itself, racist; and even to ask LE or prosecutors or courts to keep records of the race of people wending through the system is, itself, racist because only individuals matter. And the third is to Keep Looking and Evaluating. The critics of CRT are correct in their furious mischaracterization about CRT's "premise" insofar as looking for patterns does, indeed, belie a premise that maybe there are patterns there to be found. ETA: The first of these, the Singular Heart Method, defines vast disparities in collective outcomes entirely away, as immaterial. If home ownership among whites is nearly twice that of blacks... well, that is surely due solely as a matter of Individual preference, or habits, or some other solely-individual factor. It defines any differences in collective outcomes as solely the fallout of individual choices. The second of the three, the Colorblind Doctrine, is to define *the very looking for patterns* to be, itself, racist. You know what's racist? Talking about race, that's what's racist! And the third, Keep Looking and Evaluating, posits that maybe there's something there, that we can learn from and from there do better. As a great number of pp have already covered extensively, actual critical theory (of any content area) is not something that middle school kids, let alone younger ones, have the background knowledge or developmental capacity to begin to do. But *this sort of practice* is developmentally appropriate: and this sort of coverage of "difficult" content is developmentally appropriate: But we're coming from a baseline that is *nowhere within shouting distance* of those kinds of developmentally appropriate coverage. We're coming from a baseline where coverage of the historical fact that many founding fathers owned slaves evokes fury to a sizeable segment of our nation. Where coverage of the historical fact that the Constitutional Congress spent months hammering out a wobbly framework that enabled slavery to persist, including a provision that kinda-sorta counted 3/5 of slaves as "people" for a purpose that sustained white power but definitely didn't count them as people in other regards. Where the plain statement that the Civil War was "about slavery" evokes fury. Where coverage of the historical fact that the Confederate flag is a symbol of white supremacy, from the time of the Civil War, through its use by the KKK during the lynching era and again during the Civil Rights era and again in Charlottesville right through January 6, evokes fury. And where episodes like Tulsa have NOT been taught in most schools. Let alone how the combination of poll taxes & grandfather clauses were only the first of a VERY LONG and EVOLVING series of de jure and de facto measures that have disproportionately limited black and brown voter access to the vote. We have had every one of these debates, extensively, right on these boards. Not one of these issues is settled history, solidly in our past. And so whether the definition of "racIST" is mostly-individual or mostly-institutional... doesn't matter. Either way, this is our history. And also, it is our present. And also, it will be our future, until we get over the feelz and manage to grapple with it.
    12 points
  3. I’d say atrocities are occurring right now with people purposely spreading conspiracy theories and disinformation concerning the vaccines.
    12 points
  4. Whaaat?! You mean homeschooling isn’t a perfect wonderland where your adorable children hang earnestly upon your every word, thank your profusely for your dedication, then scamper off to play kindly together for the rest of the day, leaving you to contemplate your many blessings in serene silence??
    11 points
  5. So now that we worked out the details of the repairs, and though it was stressful waiting doe their realtor to catch up to them on vacation, things are going smoothly. They even have some furniture that we really like, a sleigh bed, a four poster bed, a day bed, and the patio set and the prices they quoted for us to buy them was just fantastic. We were still worried about a cash flow issue and considered turning it down, but by some miracle, money my brother has owed me for years, suddenly appeared. I guess he finally got his stimulus checks and my mom put pressure on him to square his debt. The home owners are really nice and said that we could just bring cash to our final walk through before closing and pay them then. We have picked out colors. The kitchen and 4th bedroom/Study and the hallway that the study and the laundry room are off will be Sweet Coconut milk, and the study/bed will have coffee/calls chino color accents. The living room and hallway leading to the other three bedrooms will be Helium. The sunroom and laundry room will be Tahitian Blue. The periwinkle bedroom remains that color (eldest grandson loves all things purple and purple related) and will have one wall with grey and black mountain wall decals and How to Train your dragon wall decals. The room we will use for now is white, and dh and I will not be doing any painting in there for now. The master bedroom will be a pale green that dd loves. We are leaving it to them to do that painting at their leisure so we can concentrate on getting the main parts of the house done. The bathrooms are just fine for colors. The colors are all Behr Premier or Marquee paint from Home Depot. We chose to do multiple rooms in one color to limit the number we had to choose, and to economize by buying five gallon buckets instead of the higher price of 3 gallons per color if we did a different hue in each room. So the only hurdle left is the appraisal. The mortgage officer and our closing agent said they anticipate no trouble at the price we point we are paying. But we don't know for sure when it will be done. The appraisers in the region are so busy that the only thing the company would say is they guarantee they will have it done 2-3 weeks before closing. I thought that was cutting it close, but the powers that be said it was fine. I am thankful we have a camping trip June 27-July 4 to help break up the wait time between now and our closing of July 23. The hardest thing is not telling N that he is getting a tree house. He is going to be so excited. Ds and dsl wanted it to be a surprise so he has not been told. It needs a few repairs and dh is going to do those immediately, even before we begin painting. We bought child size work gloves for him so he can help Papa M work on it. I am not sure how much help a 5.5 year old boy will be, however dh says no matter what he will be a good go-for. To everyone else trying to buy or build during this time, I wish you the very best. It is crazy out there! Just wow. We actually bought the wood here for those tree house repairs and will haul it there because our area is not having the same housing expansion so two by fours and plywood are half price the cost of Huntsville.
    10 points
  6. There's POC on this thread giving opinions on this. Why would people on tv carry more weight? I know that there is no monolithic perspective that any minority group of any type (gender, race, ethnicity, religion, etc) has on most political issues. There's always diversity of opinions and political beliefs within groups. We had organized groups of women against women's suffrage! I tend to give more weight to the consensus opinion than that of the outliers if I'm not a member of a group. As far as CRT- I think it's the new bogeyman- the new common core, evolution, sex ed, or gender studies that function as the trendy target of the day. I think there are good programs and bad programs. I think good programs should be celebrated and bad programs shouldn't be taught. I think parents who are upset with a program should address the specifics of the curriculum and attack it rather than seeing theoretical CRT as their enemy. On the other hand, it's hardly surprising that there's a backlash. CRT is inherently subversive. It asks people to look at society and the systems of power and control and to critically think about why it is the way it is and to see the shadows and skeletons behind the curtains. Kids may learn to question authority, question laws, question systems, philosophies, etc.
    9 points
  7. And as of today everybody in my immediate household is vaccinated. DS got his second shot yesterday. He ran fever and chills last night, but is back to normal today.
    9 points
  8. I should not have signed up for summer school. Bottom line. I messed up. But we just spent $8k getting a new heat pump for our house because the old one went out. Money issues stress me out too.....so it was a toss up. If I end up actually teaching, I plan to spend the $25 on Teachers Pay Teachers for what I need to make it easy.
    9 points
  9. But even suggesting it fits right in with conspiracy theories and disinformation campaigns around the vaccines. It’s so sad that some may think they are doing something good or just being open to differing view points when in actuality they are most likely causing great harm.
    9 points
  10. I'm sorry that the court is being stupid about the parenting plan. I'm absolutely disgusted by how I see former stay at home moms and caregivers treated in the courts of late. I really wish the courts would stop focusing on the "marital home" and instead look at the realities of who has been the primary caregiver. For so many kids "the marital home" is a place that they have experienced really crappy things and associate with fighting. Children deserve better.
    9 points
  11. Well, the abject failures re reading lead me to give more credence to the concerns about abject failures re teaching racial justice. CRT is a tertiary level way of theorizing about the world. The academy is an appropriate place for people to engage in complex theory making about the world. CRT is a valuable lens to study, discuss and write about issues of race. I don't think about it as being very different to some forms of feminist theory. Structural racism exists. Just as other inequities have been coded into systems and institutions. No, I don't think it is solved by asking K-8ers to primarily conceptualize themselves and others in terms of a hierarchy of intersecting identities. And actually, it would not surprise me to learn that this very contemporary way of foregrounding identities isn't really at the heart of CRT. I worry that raising a consciousness of White identity in children may be counterproductive. I think there are likely valid criticisms of programs currently being taught. And I don't currently trust my side of politics ATM to be honest. I really don't. This is to do with experience in another social arena. So I'm not prepared to take it as read that if 'my' side is in favour, it's gotta be good. My side has been in favour of some dodgy things, lately. The left only has itself to blame when I'm not waving my pom poms, frankly.
    8 points
  12. A few things... - increase the entrance and/or exit requirements for prospective teachers. Elementary teacher education programs have some of the lowest barriers to entry. - increase the content knowledge demands of teacher education programs. A lot of them focus on banners and poster projects and infantilize their students in the process (in an effort to help them ‘be’ the students they will be teaching). - improve teacher education and professional development with more collaborative consideration/discussion of case studies—less lecturing, more puzzling and in-class demonstrations/critiques. - ensuring teachers spend time in a variety of learning environments before receiving full tenure so they can work with and get to know lots of different types of kids/families. - encourage more team teaching. I think teams of teachers can better assess students and themselves. DD hasn’t connected with a single teacher in high school. None of them ‘know’ her. - commensurate with these increased intellectual and professional development demands, increase the pay. A lot of the critiques I see come down to people isolated in their classrooms with the best of intentions (maybe) and the worst judgment b/c their content knowledge is so weak. DHs cousin became a charter teacher after basically flunking out of the Navy as an enlisted RP. For those who don’t know, it’s a ‘religious person’, about the least demanding field you can find. As far as I know, he’s still a pathetic jerk and still teaching elementary kids.
    8 points
  13. I keep thinking that people are taking the idea that the systems around us are racist way too personally. It's not a personal indictment or setting people against anyone to say that we're all fallible and imperfect and raised with biases that we don't always spot or realize. But people are so deeply threatened by that very basic idea. And I could go through and deconstruct why they're so threatened, but people are so angry. It's just impossible to get through.
    8 points
  14. This weekend our daughter married her boyfriend of two years. We love their family and have known them for four years or so. He was also homeschooled and it was such a sweet day. We did the ceremony with immediate family only and a BBQ at his parents house. The big reception/celebration is in two weeks. In the meantime, they’re headed to Colorado for a honeymoon. They don’t have all their pictures back and I only have one family shot - her with our three boys. ♥️ Will delete later for privacy but wanted to share...
    7 points
  15. You know, here's how I see it in the end... Teachers and public schools are a massive mixed bag. We all know that all kinds of things get messed up when in the implementation level. Most teachers are intelligent, wonderful people who had to jump through a lot of hoops to get into the classroom. But who have to do a LOT and are constantly under siege from "the latest thing" and who bring their own biases to the table. That's all just true no matter what program or total lack of program is implemented - meaning that no matter what is done, some teachers will teach racism and a few will mess up and make some white kid think there's something wrong with being white. That's the fallibility of human teachers. CRT is an academic lens meant for looking at systems in a critical way in academia. No one is advocating that it be taught that way to little kids. The more basic idea that we all have privileges we can be aware of, that racism can be everywhere, that it's something we need to actively be aware of, and that intentions and actions/results don't always match up... is all stuff that many, many people have been successful in teaching young children (and older ones) in a variety of ways to all sorts of groups. It's not academia, phd material. It does not make white kids feel guilty, just aware. People who are more concerned that somehow teachers are going to get a good attempt wrong than they are about the current lack of guidance and willingness to address one of the foundational issues in American history, culture, politics, and society in our education system are enabling racism. When you're more worried that some teacher will mess up and make some hypothetical poor white kid feel guilty about being white than you are that the system blindly perpetuating bias in a million little ways - something that is not at all hypothetical, but borne out in all sorts of data, then you're focused on the wrong problem. Obviously, it's absolutely worth it to discuss these issues, continually engage in teacher education, examine and refine what we're doing, and try to get it right. But it's not threatening or guilting white folks to say that white people have advantages that we have no control over and that just being aware of that helps us be better allies. My white kids got that from a very young age. They don't feel guilty about being white. It hasn't hurt them a bit. They're fine.
    7 points
  16. If they don’t straighten out the problem at school very quickly, maybe it’s a sign that you should take some time off to get your dad settled in and then spend the summer relaxing by the pool with your little guy. You spend so much time taking care of others, that maybe it’s time to take a little care of yourself.
    7 points
  17. How do you see the best way to tackle this? For me, I'd mandate reflection skills as part of the undergrad teaching degree. It feels like a training problem. I'd also probably want to incorporate some cross-cultural counselling modules, to help teachers interpret culturally diverse ways of being in the classroom. It's pretty hard though. I bet you a million bucks I'm missing some of my own biases. I KNOW teachers are missing their biases wrt learning challenges, particularly ADHD. I KNOW they are missing class and race biases wrt the cleaning staff, because I talk to the cleaning staff and they tell me how ignored they feel. And yes, the cleaning staff are all WOC. The other part of the problem, to me, is that there is no time set aside for formal reflection time, and no mentoring of staff to undertake it.
    7 points
  18. This is the way I approached history with my kids too. In addition to ‘who’ is telling the story/in the story, we asked what perspectives may be missing and whether we could find books or bits of info written from those perspectives. That naturally led to why we could or couldn’t find that info. If we could find other perspectives, we read them and discussed whether, how and why they were different. It wasn’t that hard. It’s what launched DS into historical graphic novels, biographies and autobiographies. He loves them. My oldest still doesn’t like to read much but knows enough to run through these questions, almost reflexively.
    6 points
  19. I agree. My sense is that, as a poster upthread said, the teachers don't have time to figure out how to dig into this. This should not be an excuse to a) ignore the problem or b) do a terrible or damaging job. I want to believe that teachers and school districts hold the goal of reducing bigotry and ultimately structural racism through new approaches across the curriculum. Clumsy, heavy-handed, demonizing - not helpful. Children need joyful and straightforward. And there is joy in anti-racism! I also think the young kids being taught this right now will be some crackerjack thinkers and do-ers in the future. When I taught a group of 5, 6, and 7th graders US History, one of my main goals for this age was to avoid defaulting to White. What I mean by that is making sure that when the class talked about "what was happening when" we asked "who" also - when the Lowell girls were striking, were they White? All races? When women wore certain types of dresses, was it all women? Enslaved women? Then just kept going or else got more involved if a student engaged with it. Without spending much time on it, I wanted these kids to remember, when they got to higher level history learning in the future, to question the default assumption of Whiteness in historical thinking. Was this a worth-while pedagogical theory? I don't know, but I do know that my own dd who was in the class now "questions the narrative" with both ease and grace.
    6 points
  20. While I’m not claiming it’s some perfectly unbiased article and I haven’t bothered to search for others on the issue, The NY Times article I posted about division among Souther Baptists gives examples of the opposite. Whites leaders and pastors opposing CRT and black pastors and leaders upset about that opposition. I’m still not clear from this thread about how many feel in general about CRT outside of schools. At least some seem to want to acknowledge structural racism exists as long as we don’t call it that or use CRT or label any policies or laws or people or institutions as racist. It’s all a bit confusing to me. I do think it’s very unfortunate that the term CRT as has been co-opted and used as part of a disinformation and cultural war campaign. But I have no trouble also believing some schools are doing a terrible job of implementing programs around it and I honestly don’t have much faith most could do it effectively. If that were the case, all schools would be using research proven best practices for teaching reading. And they most definitely aren’t.
    6 points
  21. My 12 year old son got his second shot today. It went ok. He was a bit nervous but the firefighters who were administering the vaccines were really great. No reactions thus far, says his arm hardly hurt at all and this time was less painful than the first. With this shot, everyone in our local extended family group has had both doses. Which is great. I’m happy about that. No one else in the family has had a bad reaction to the Pfizer vaccine. My dad got Moderna but the rest of us got Pfizer. Vaccine rates in Seattle are 70%
    6 points
  22. If it's humid then I don't think Frog Togs or spraying yourself with water or anything like that helps. You don't get evaporative cooling when the humidity is sky high. Definitely drink tons. You have my sympathy. Hot weather makes me physically ill.
    6 points
  23. Sure. It's how the media landscape works, for one thing. Outrage = clicks. But here's a fourth thought - my ideological opponent may weaponise an issue. That doesn't mean the issue is illusory. Look, I'm largely sympathetic to CRT. The home education I gave my kids was roughly in alignment with CRT principles. But in school? I'm sorry, but I cannot effectively teach small children while considering them as 'holding power'. I can consider what it means to be teacher literally holding all power in a room where children are not all like me, and that's appropriate as part of professional development. I'm thinking through my own objections, and ironically, it has something to do with power and who holds it. I feel as if focusing on student identities is a magician's trick - look over here at the functionally powerless while the functionally powerful (admin and above) do....nothing that threatens their pay/position/status.
    6 points
  24. There's something about the conversation that's so puzzling to me, and that's the rhetorical leap from 'concerns about CRT training in schools' to 'people are denying racism exists and just trying to hold on to power with their white/Jewish/Asian hands.' It really is possible to hold two thoughts in one's head: that racism and racists exist, including in systemic ways, and that it's OK to listen to critiques of how CRT inspired ideas are manifesting in schools. As a feminist, I had to get my head around the idea that critiquing manifestations of patriarchy really has very little to do with individuals in front of me. Are there men with immense power? Sure. Are most men and boys around me drenched in patriarchal power? Well, not so much, and when you see the disadvantage some of them deal with by virtue of class, family dysfunction, disability, homelessness - yes, in a highly theoretical way they possess 'power', but in material terms, what does it mean? Again, it's possible to believe two things. Racism exists. It damages. AND in a school setting, students must be seen as individuals, not as representatives of their identity class (es).
    6 points
  25. They're slow fliers--pretty easy to just "clap" them to smithereens. No toxic fumes. Wash hands after.
    6 points
  26. You might look at Kate Snow's Math With Confidence. The program is fully scripted and a mix of mastery teaching with spiral review built in. The lessons are hands-on and playful, the workbook is colorful, and the lessons are short. I believe you can find a sample of unit 1 for grade 1 on The Well Trained Mind website.
    5 points
  27. Hugs, DawnM. You have a lot going on, and I know in my life, if one area is stressful, everything else is harder to deal with. I am sorry.
    5 points
  28. Back to experiences... 14 yo dd1 got her first shot Friday and only has only had a slightly sore arm.
    5 points
  29. Obviously you have no qualms about spreading conspiracy theories and disinformation concerning the vaccines which could potentially cause harm to others.
    5 points
  30. I think bodies just handle things differently. A few years ago (2018?) one of my kids gave my sisters’ kid pneumonia. My kid was pretty sick but not terrible. My sisters kid was almost hospitalized, lost some crazy percentage of his body weight and took 6 weeks to get over it. It was truly scary. Why? 🤷‍♀️ They are the same age, both healthy kids. It was the last major illness for either of them. Different diet? Different micro biome? No idea.
    5 points
  31. Yep. And really hard and awkward for almost everyone concerned, and usually not anyone's fault. But he is invited? I wouldn't be too quick to assume that it's not genuine concern; some kids would indeed feel uncomfortable being the only boy or only girl. I'd try really hard not to interfere too much. Like, if he is actually invited, I wouldn't artificially rig things so he was unable to go. I'd let him decide, and I'd let the chips fall where they may. You might be 100% right that at least one of them is reluctant to have them there, but, on the flip side, you might be wrong and actually accelerating the end of the friendship by having him skip the party. It sucks, but they have to make their own mistakes and navigate their own hurts.
    5 points
  32. @Pen I administer mRNA vaccines at a mass vaccination site. Nobody is getting placebo! Our process doesn't involve any signatures. Consent to receive vaccine is verbal. Age 12+ consent for themselves, unless there is a capacity issue. Patients register (demographics and insurance) online or by phone when booking their appointment. Information about the vaccines is available for review at that time. In clinic, vaccinators identify the patient, ask the screening questions, answer any questions, get explicit verbal consent for covid vaccine (specifically for either Pfizer of Moderna, whichever product we are using that day), and document all of this electronically. There are paper copies of the product monograph and product information sheets on site for patients to review if they wish (I have yet to have a patient who has wanted to do this). After their vaccination, patients get a printed and/or electronic receipt with their name and other demographics, product name, lot number, injection volume, injection site, location of the clinic and name of the vaccinator. They also get a paper handout with a list of common side effects, a list of symptoms to watch that might suggest a serious reaction, and what to do about them.
    5 points
  33. = structural racism. That's what we're talking about. I've been gone all day but others have posted many links supporting these "vague generalized claims." It's shocking to me that a grown person in this day and age would characterize this information in this way. Don't take critical thinking about systemic racism personally. It's not about you, it's about us.
    5 points
  34. I feel like the last 10 posts are on the theme of "the things that HAVEN'T changed over the years," lol.
    5 points
  35. As for thanking me for my dedication.... It took my older boy only about 2 months at MIT to thank me profusely for homeschooling him.
    5 points
  36. I appreciate you’re doing that, seriously. That hasn’t been my experience with most teachers at all, most recently with DD this semester. There are teachers who deliberately make up their own Americanized names for students vs. learning their true name when it’s offered and pronounced, not because they’re asked to come up with a diminutive/alternative (sometimes the student or parent will ask for one) but because it’s easier for the teacher. Teachers who see a kid struggling and presume there’s some family issue/no parental involvement vs. a specific learning challenge. We have lawsuits from teachers who don’t want to be forced to call students by their preferred names, teachers who are so upset by the prospect of thinking through the very things you described who are rallying to the anti-CRT cause. It’s all become of a piece, part of a larger campaign to lead the unexamined life. Teaching is hard. We ask a lot, often too much, administratively but this kind of stuff is to my mind the MOST important part. A lot of academic disparities are driven not just by wealth and language acquisition but by the unexamined ‘little’ things that happen everyday.
    5 points
  37. I am all for voting rights. The biggest reason that states can pull the crap they are pulling right now is that the SCOTUS overturned the enforcement provisions of the Voting Rights Act. That said, the idea that high turnout means Democrats will absolutely win (an idea that I have help close to my heart as an active Democrat) was not borne out this last fall. The Democrats had very middling results in the house and senate even in states that very much went for Biden. We can talk districting and voter suppression. We can also talk, and need to talk, about why it was that so many people weren't moved to support down ballot Democrats. Most of the election postmortems that I saw weren't very honest about the deficits in Democratic strategy. I honestly don't think that in the absence of the pandemic, Biden would have won. I don't like that (not one little bit) but I think it's true. ETA: In my state, two congressional races I think could be made competitive if the Democrats focused on issues once again re-elected Republicans. Right wing gerrymandering or voter suppression is certainly NOT an issue here (we have motor voter and all mail in voting here) so the issue is that Democrats are losing on the message, even with astoundingly high voter turnout.
    5 points
  38. I've tried to inoculate mine (mixed-race kids) by formally studying racism and social justice at home, through a CRT lens. We homeschool, but DS 13 (finishing grade 7) will likely go to public high school. I figure that if he already has a thorough grounding in antiracism through a CRT lens at home, then that will be protective against any poorly taught antiracism content that might happen at school. He understands that structural racism is a systemic problem wth historical roots, and not the fault of any one person. He understands the concepts of bias (we all have some), privilege (we all hold some), and intersectionality. He understands that privilege is often invisible to those who hold it. We talk about how our privilege or lack-there-of plays out in real life. He and his father hold male privilege and I don't, I hold white privilege and they don't. How structural racism has influenced our family's history. All of this happens quite organically, without anyone feeling threatened or labelled as an oppressor. He understands that systemic/structural racism is the disease, and that internalized and interpersonal racism are the symptoms. I actually think that mixed families may have an advantage with this. There are opportunities to do this teaching quite organically at home in a very real-life way that maybe same-race families don't have. ETA: One of my kids is white-passing, and the other isn't. That has also added layers to the conversation.
    5 points
  39. Maybe I need to rethink that! https://www.bostonherald.com/2021/06/11/cape-cod-fisherman-ok-after-whale-gulps-him-down-spits-him-out/?fbclid=IwAR20LbAaNLvnHPTF0jZRszsjIaY3Jct6s_wHhS68ms55utap5ip6RFrkoIY
    4 points
  40. Good Morning!!!! COFFEE!!~D Sunday!!! church!!⛪️ It’s heating up this week. Supposed to be 114 by Friday. It was so pleasant last week. HIgh 70’s and 80’s. Nights were in the 50’s. Awesome sleeping weather. I hate summer. We went to a graduation party last night. Had the graduate’s FFA project for dinner. Pulled pork sandwiches. That was a little creepy.
    4 points
  41. An excellent point regarding ‘content knowledge’. I think to some extent this goes back to whether teachers are typically/exclusively the ‘best and brightest’ of a group. When my grandmother was a teacher, around 1910, teaching was the highest occupation that a woman could aspire to, and there were high standards of knowledge, conduct, and skill involved as requirements for it. People generally did not try to become teachers unless they were already viewed as very capable and to some extent superior. Once women started to get opportunities to move into fields that had been reserved only for men, then teaching was a field that competed with other fields for candidates, and that reduce the pool enough to reduce the quality of the average applicant. There are absolutely still outstanding teachers, but now there are also some poorly qualified ones as well. I think that teachers’ colleges tend to assume content knowledge and teach pedagogy, which is no longer reasonable.
    4 points
  42. @DawnM Recently, I read an article about the enormous number of students who will be in Summer School this year and the need for teachers for them. The article may have been about NC, in particular, but the USA in general. I think it was about NC, but am not positive. That said, with what you wrote, I suggest you tell the powers that be that you are available to be a Counselor, if they can guarantee that you will be a Counselor during Summer School, and not reassigned to be a classroom teacher and if not you have a full plate and are not available to teach in a classroom.
    4 points
  43. Today's plan Church Paint after I buy a new roller Cook my guys some dinner- I may just eat salad Drive to my parent's-will be taking her to eye surgery check up tomorrow Whatever else I find to do
    4 points
  44. Good morning! I hope you get it, Amy! Today: church pack and prep for camping - I am excited and a little nervous. First solo camping trip since my 20’s. Just car camping, very close to civilization. But I have not had 5 nights alone since I got married, 19 years ago. call mom pool?
    4 points
  45. Hi Everyone. I am absolutely OVERWHELMED with all the positive replies. I wasn’t online much today so I am just catching up and you all have such amazing insight and advice. I can’t thank you enough. I will try to sort through all these replies and respond on Monday. You are all so encouraging. Thank you all 💜
    4 points
  46. I'm really hoping that's what happens here and not being sent bills from DD8's future therapist as the person whose fault they were... 😉
    4 points
  47. Yep, I found ours, though it's missing a few obvious things (like laundry hamper). I also enjoyed the FAQ section. One of the questions was "is there parking for uhauls?" and the answer is "If you need a uhaul, you are bringing way too much stuff."
    4 points
  48. Ok. So this is interesting. Because to me the above is part of ongoing professional reflection, and I guess I'm assuming that most educators do it. But maybe they don't. By reflection I mean in the moment noting one's own preferences/choices in regard to students, and then later, critiquing those choices. So for example, I noted a bias towards girls in my interactions, and have worked on establishing the same kind of personal relationships with the boys. I also noticed at the beginning of the year I had less trouble remembering white names, so I focused on learning the names of my Asian students. I tend to have a positive bias towards the mixed race kids, because they remind me of my own kids. I have to monitor that in myself and make sure my interactions are consistent across white/mixed cohorts. I can 100% see a role for training at staff level in how to do reflection ( I learned it in an Effective Education class that wasn't part of an undergrad teaching degree).
    4 points
  49. Honestly, this is true about just about any curriculum change in public schools. We've seen it with math instruction, reading instruction, and all kinds of things. For some reason I can't figure out, schools seem to be terrible at being able to recognize what curriculum actually have good research base to support them, and they are forever adopting awful programs. One of the reasons I didn't feel like our public schools were even an option for us was Everyday Math and sight reading curriculum. So, it certainly doesn't surprise me that schools are not doing a good job with this. I don't think throwing the baby out with the bathwater by just deciding we won't address race issues in schools is a solution. As I've said, that viewpoint takes a "white" view as the default. I don't have a Twitter account either, but all that means is I can't follow accounts or comment. You can still read whatever you want on Twitter (unless someone has a private account, but I almost never run into that). When a Twitter link is posted on TWTM, for some reason I find I usually have to ctrl-click on the date and open in a new tab in order to view it. Maybe that's just me. The funny thing is, I've been finding the majority of all your examples you've been posting are actually very good examples of structural racism, and the kind of things that should be taught in schools. Pointing out structural racism isn't the same thing as calling schools or individuals racist. Not recognizing it makes it almost impossible to fix. I agree with whoever said in this thread or another that it would be better to call what we're talking about structural racism than CRT. CRT has become a trigger word applied to a lot of things that aren't even about CRT (by design to get a reaction) to the point it seems unhelpful at this time. It's been co-opted.
    4 points
  50. No, that is NOT a normal thing to do. People who are involved in a clinical trial give consent and know that they may be getting treatment or may be getting a placebo. To withhold treatment that people think they’re getting without informed consent is a huge ethics violation. And fraud. It’s the kind of thing that ends up going down in history under the heading ATROCITIES. It is a vile thing to accuse medical providers of with no reason and no evidence.
    4 points
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