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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/10/2021 in all areas

  1. I think it's important to discuss things like this. But I have to ask, what's your goal for being here, Fritz? You seem to be trying your best to sew division and discord among the various members here who hold different beliefs. Is that your end goal? Do you do that in personal, irl relationships, as well? If you're looking for a group that only discusses politics and controversial topics, perhaps this board isn't for you.
    18 points
  2. That’s not even close. A critical theory is ANY theory critical of another theory, as opposed to a stand alone theory. From your own link “ A "critical theory" has a distinctive aim: to unmask the ideology falsely justifying some form of social or economic oppression—to reveal it as ideology“ Marx’s theory is a theory that is critical of capitalism. ….That does not mean that every critical theory is somehow Communists and bad. That class is simple a view of Marx through the lense of his theory being a critical theory. Meaning you can’t study Marx without studying capitalism. Also from your link …” Any prospects for change, reform, or for Marx, revolution requires first that people come to see capitalism for what it is“. You can’t criticize (in the academic critical thinking sense) what you do not understand. Du Bois is credited with thinking up CRT and the thing he was criticizing was the idea that race is biological and black people were inferior. He believed race was socially constructed not a biological fact. He is criticizing that view, and rightly so.
    17 points
  3. I think if you were looking for actual conversation, saying things like "I'm sure some will, as usual, attack the source" and "I am sure there will be claims that..." isn't the way to go about it, because you are preemptively dismissing objections as being based on bias or "claims". Now, you can of course reply to me and say that you were just trying to skip the first round of objections and get to the meat of the issue, but the tone used is dismissive of any contrary opinion so that plausible deniability isn't worth much. If you don't see it, I think you may not be ready for actual in depth conversations. Starting off with a link and a vague poke at the bear is not a conversation starter: if you have a position, spell it out yourself without relying on a link and have the rest of us making assumptions of what we're actually discussing. Links are for reference or further reading, not a bulk of a conversation opener. So, I don't see this as a genuine conversation starter, as much as a controversy stirrer. Which can be fun, don't get me wrong, but I'd rather get into a lively debate over the best type of frosting or if we're responsible for putting random stray carts into the the cart corral at the store. I'm sure some will, as usual, think that fondant is actually edible but it certainly isn't... 😛 eta: had a sentence fragment. plus added a sentence.
    17 points
  4. Way back when I was a college writing tutor I had a student in a religious studies class who brought his paper assignment to me extremely distraught because it was a biblical criticism paper and he thought that meant he was supposed to write negative things about the Bible. He was very relieved when I explained that “criticism” in this context means analyze carefully with attention to detail, not badmouth. It seems like a lot of people are making the same mistake (or deliberately propagating it) with regard to critical race theory. Someone said something negative about white people in a school setting, it must be critical race theory!
    16 points
  5. I know you were joking, but as someone who is a lot closer to @Mrs Tiggywinkle‘s mother’s age than I am to her age, I have to say that I think it’s pretty terrible that anyone would do something like changing the parental access settings on the TV so their parents couldn’t watch their favorite news channel. And making the assumption that their parent would be too stupid and inept to realize what had happened is possibly even worse. And don’t even get me started on the idea of “carefully curating parental YouTube lists,” because I think that may be even worse. People may disagree with their parents, and they may think their parents are watching the wrong news channels or that their parents have some beliefs which with they don’t agree, but let’s not forget that those parents have every right to watch whatever news channels they want to watch, and they can watch whatever YouTube videos they choose, as well. If someone disagrees with their parents about things like the Covid vaccine, I’m all in favor of having some long discussions about it... but being intentionally deceptive and sneaky in order to get them to see things your way? No. Just NO. Mrs. Tiggywinkle’s mom is only in her 60’s. We have quite a few WTMers who are in their late 50s and 60s (including me — I’m 57,) and it’s just plain offensive to see so many posts on this forum lately that seem to suggest that anyone who is old enough to be the parent of a WTMer must be well on the road to mental incompetence. Again, I’m not picking on you — please don’t take any offense! I know you were joking! It’s just that I have seen people make similar comments in other threads over the past several months (and those people were serious,) and I finally reached a point where I had to say something about it.
    15 points
  6. What Fox News says is “critical race theory” is not at all what I learned about in my sociology classes (sociology major). We learned that race is a social construct. It comes from the study of law and the way “racism is built into and reproduced through institutions that organize every day life, particularly the law”. Seems a rather sensible thing to study and an odd thing to be mad about today, since it’s been around since the 70s. It’s not even specifically about people being racist, it’s more about ways that systems are set up in a way that negatively impacts POC, often inadvertently but sometime purposefully. That just plain doesn’t feel controversial.
    15 points
  7. No, there’s not. But there is a huge disconnect between what Republican politicians want and what Republican voters want, so Fox News must find something to anger and confuse people, and this is what they’ve settled on. Literally it means history is inherently biased. This is not a new or controversial idea, but it does scare people who care more about pride, patriotism, or American exceptionalism than they do the truth.
    15 points
  8. Is your repetition of "I'm so sure" intended to dismiss any argument before it even happens?
    15 points
  9. Have you ever read the reviews for the sugar free gummy bears? They are legendary comedy gold. https://www.amazon.com/Sugar-Free-Gummy-Bears-5LBS/product-reviews/B00CMS97YS
    15 points
  10. Yes, it's interesting that the only threads you @Fritz start are about controversial topics - ones that you know in advance will bring controversy. What is your purpose here? Many but not all of the people here homeschool. Some are finished homeschooling, some send their kids to public or private school, and some have a mix of homeschooled and brick & mortar schooled kids. We discuss controversial topics to be sure but we also discuss our kids (young as well as the adult ones), grandchildren, kitchen gadgets, recipes, selling/buying a house, what shoes to wear to a theme park, and a host of other topics. Your only topics are about controversial issues. Reasons?
    14 points
  11. I'd bet good money that his boss is one of those people who claims no one wants to work. I hope your DS quits ASAP, and goes back to McDonald's or somewhere else that has some respect for their employees.
    14 points
  12. People who criticize CRT will often make the claim that their poor, defenseless (white) children were being baselessly made to feel guilty for the fact that some white people, a long time ago, owned slaves, and that this is bad for the nonwhite children because it's teaching them to be victims. I guess it's possible some rogue teacher out there is, in fact, instructing children to feel guilty. But there's a few tells that usually make me doubt the whole thing. I haven't actually seen these videos - no time to watch videos today - but I simply can't trust anybody who, say, claims that the materials say one thing but doesn't actually present the material so we can evaluate that claim, or asserts that the teacher said something in class just because that's how they understood what their child reported and apparently did no follow-through to see if the child had just gotten the wrong end of the stick somehow, as children often do. I mean, my kid once came home and told me that her teacher didn't like her because she had failed to give her a sticker on a handout. It took about five minutes to clear that up and confirm that the teacher had run out of stickers. The next handout got two to make up for it. Same kid once told me that her teacher (different teacher, different grade) had definitely said every number with a 2 in it is even. I didn't post a video on the internet about the craaaaaaazy new math, because I knew she had just misunderstood! But with some topics, it's like certain sets of parents are eager to turn off their critical thinking skills. (A related issue is that of literature teaching. If somebody tells me breathlessly that a certain Classic Book has been Removed From The List at a school, but doesn't tell me what it was replaced with - that's the full list, not excerpts! - then I stop listening. They're either not too bright or they think I am, and either way, why bother? I wonder if those people think there is anything worth reading that wasn't written by a white person.)
    13 points
  13. Amen. Or maybe just, you know, start a real discussion. She has started many of these threads with "here's a link to something that will shock and offend you, but I'm not going to tell you what it is". I don't click on links without context just to be shocked or offended. I don't need to be told there is shocking and offensive stuff on the internet. Maybe instead, she could say "There is systemic racism in the US because of A, B, and C, and this is what we can do about it". Feel free to use links as evidence for you position, but the position should be in the post.
    13 points
  14. Plum, this isn't directed at you; I just want to clarify why I am not wanting to engage on this particular thread. It's not the topic as much as the original intent. Yeah, a lot of us are piling on the intent aspect of this, that's true. But since the OP hasn't given us a real definition, purpose, concern, or much more than some links, what are we supposed to talk about? I don't want to get into a whole conversation and then 35 posts down OP comes back with "but that isn't what I meant" or "that's not what CRT is" when they refused to give that in the first place. It gives them an out of the conversation and a way to turn the conversation into an example of being misunderstood or "but I didn't say that" and I guess that'd be true because they didn't really say anything. I guess I'm more suspicious of traps right now. I have participated in good faith on other threads so it's not like this is a default reaction for me; this one in particular feels too incomplete to trust though. Also, I don't have the time for 4 links, including a video that I can't listen to but am told I need to see, in order to get a glimmer of what we're actually talking about. "But did you even read the 3rd link?" is not something I want to come back to later. eta: I agree the board can be intimidating and I still only post maybe 1/3 of what I write. But for me it's not because I'm afraid the battle, or offended by it, as much as I don't have the time and half of what I write out are ramblings as I work out my own position myself based on other posts (and I try to only post if I feel I'll add to the convo, so that rules out a great deal of what I would say, LOL). I don't agree that the answer to this is preemptively telling others that if they object to a source (especially when the source is the bulk of my post) that they need not reply or dismiss others' views so summarily. That only adds to the problem, if the problem is in fact that they feel intimidated, since they are indulging in the behavior they are saying is the problem: intimidating others who dare to think differently.
    12 points
  15. Confession: I will say this board can be super intimidating. I often feel like I am heading into battle because I don’t always fall into the same line of thinking other people here do. I often start to post something and think better of it. Half the time I don’t think I get my point across as clearly as I would like. I am often under a time constraint and hit post before I am ready. I can understand preparing for an onslaught of posts that don’t address what I really want to talk about and instead focus on one thing I said for pages. And I’ve been on this forum for ages. Maybe instead of pages harping on about how she presented it, can we just talk about it? I’d really like to know what all of you think it’s about vs how it’s represented. Are schools taking it too far? Not far enough?
    12 points
  16. Here an unpaid 30 minute meal break is required + a 15 minute paid break every 4 hours. And I’ve seen people demand it if the boss was trying to circumvent it. I don’t understand how anyone would think a 12 hour shift with no breaks would result in quality or productive work. I would definitely encourage my son to get another job if his boss was being this stupid.
    12 points
  17. I realize that as time has gone on they’ve been more confident that immunity lasted more and more months. Then you get the situation in Manaus, Brazil, where it seemed that reinfection might be happening. I’m always amazed to hear that some people knew all along about these things, despite it being a novel virus. I can understand making educated assumptions, but being absolutely sure way before everyone else not so much, and also not making policy decisions based on educated assumptions. We feel like we are still continuously learning, looking after Covid patients, where I work.
    12 points
  18. To the point of the opening post, just because someone lived through a horrific sort of oppression doesn't mean they can't then also participate in oppression of others. I read Maus by Art Spiegelman with my class this year - it's a memoir of the author's conversations with his father about the Holocaust. One of the things we discussed is how he shows how his father - a Holocaust survivor - goes on a long winded diatribe about how horrible and lazy all Black people are and calls a particular Black person names. That doesn't make him less of a victim of oppression or undermine that the Holocaust was violent and terrible. Same for the Cultural Revolution. If teachers start making the kids write big character posters instead of doing... any other schoolwork and send them to beat up their grandmothers and haul in all the antiques in town in roving bands in the name of CRT, I promise I'll eat my words. But I don't see it happening. No one reasonable does.
    11 points
  19. @math teacher Tangential... How the Chat board displayed to me... I think it answers your question. 🤣
    10 points
  20. Is it possible you can go to her house and quietly change the parental access so she can't watch Fox News? And then claim total ignorance when she says she can't watch it anymore? "Gosh, those packages are always changing! Here, I'll share my netflix package so we can watch the same shows!" (I'm mostly being sarcastic, but, true confession, I do know people who have done this to great success, and also people who spent hours carefully curating parental youtube lists to get them off the conspiracy video treadmill.)
    10 points
  21. If the source is bad, why should we waste time on it, Fritz? We all evaluate sources. That's a perfectly sensible and reasonable thing to do.
    9 points
  22. I’d honestly want to rule out seizure activity. Seizures present in many different ways and it’s concerning that he both vomited and had an aura. Most people who pass out don’t vomit.
    9 points
  23. re structure of scientific method vs (normal, human) tendency toward confirmation bias Kate Starbird (who, despite her implausibly Marvel name, is a dead-serious researcher of disinformation systems) writes often about the differences between the structure of the scientific method (question -> hypothesis -> development of a replicable test to assess the hypothesis -> testing/measurement/publication of both method and results -> replication of test by others -> validation (or not) of results by others.... -> modification of hypothesis or test by others -> tweaking of hypothesis -> rinse lather repeat until the end of time...) which is a REALLY COMPLEX TIME CONSUMING LABORIOUS PROCESS SUBJECT TO CONFLICT AND DISAGREEMENT, vs structure of disinformation (claim -> substantiation) which is vastly shorter and easier. There are no shortcuts. When you see the latter, without any of the former, such as blinding or sufficient specificity around the method that the "substantiation" can be replicated by others... it's a tell.
    9 points
  24. My point was that there seems to be a distressing trend here to make the assumption that just because a person has reached a certain age, they are probably incapable of making good decisions or even deciding what television stations to watch. And that age is apparently 55+ based on comments I have read over the past several months. It is not okay to assume that once people reach a certain age, their judgment is impaired. It is rude and it is insulting. And realistically, who are we to assume that we are the ones who get to define what is and is not “misinformation” for our parents or other adults? Who are we to decide what news stations they are allowed to watch? How can we be so sure that we are right and they are wrong? It is awful that some people feel the need to infantilize people simply because they are of a certain age. I would have been livid if anyone had ever tried to do that to my parents or grandparents, because they were most definitely mentally sound until they passed away in their 80s and 90s. And I sure don’t want anyone doing it to me just because I’m an “old lady” of 57.
    8 points
  25. Twice I read this as random stray cats before my brain and eyes decided to work together. It would certainly make those cart corral debates more interesting and would give a whole new meaning to herding cats. 😂🤣🐈🛒
    8 points
  26. Is that because "the source" of this story that says the cultural revolution "pitted students against one another and their teachers" is the prime example of a deplorable propaganda source in this country that does the same thing they hypocritically criticise 24/7? Good god. Faux News is populism run amok. They out to look in the mirror and repent for the damage they've done to this nation. Bill
    8 points
  27. Yeah, especially the bolded. Although to be fair, I recognize that because Judaism as a whole is such an unimaginably tiny fragment -- there are more Muslims in Egypt, or Christians in India, than there are Jews on the earth; which affects everything -- that it's not very realistic to hope that most fellow Americans have any meaningful insight into the distinctions between the movements within that whole. And also to be fair, an awful lot of Jews don't know or care about distinctions between Latin Mass Catholics vs Methodists vs Quakers vs LDS vs non-denominational evangelists. We all tend to focus on our own particular circuses, LOL. [I may delete this because it's kinda cranky, which isn't QUITE how I actually feel MOST of the time, but...] For me (also Reform, though had I started with a clean sheet of paper and picked out a movement that best fit my worldview / personality / approach to text and quest, I probably would have attached to Reconstructionist), it's not exactly that I am offended by the Christian conflation of kosher-keeping or family purity laws with who is a "real" Jew. (God knows we play that game within the house as well, le sigh.) It's more a recognition that that very trope loops back to "legalism," which has its own Phariseean storyline that lays its own groundwork for its own Very Bad Seeds. The integrated implication is that Jews who lean into the full observance side of the tradition are "legalistic" in a way that Jesus revealed was not what God whats; and Jews who lean more toward the prophetic/ethical side that is also part of the tradition are "watered down" and not "real" which is ALSO not what God wants, and again, le sigh. Just tend to your own circus, LOL.
    8 points
  28. Nope, not at all. Although I did not say "I'm so sure" . Go ahead argue away that this is not what CRT really is. I have noticed the dismissiveness of some on this board to deflect by slamming the source rather than speak to the topic at hand.
    8 points
  29. This is why scientific studies are blinded. It is very easy for a human brain to feel a "pull" where it expects to feel and pull, and to feel none where it expects none. When studies are not blinded (as your little trial was not) the results are far too easily influenced in the direction we anticipate.
    8 points
  30. How scary for you and dss! I’ll pray for your dh, Scarlett, and I hope you get some answers soon. Since you were out with friends both times this happened, could your dh be having some kind of unusual allergic reaction to something he only eats or drinks when you are out at restaurants? My biggest fear would be that you could have been on your way home and this could have happened while he was driving. Fortunately, he had a little warning that it was going to happen, but if you were on a highway, he might not have had enough time to pull over. I hope he’s okay, Scarlett!!!
    8 points
  31. I’m very sorry to hear about your dad, and I understand why you are concerned! But I think the average 70yo is still far more competent than that, and doesn’t need to be treated as though their mind is no longer sharp enough to decide what TV channels to watch.
    7 points
  32. K, as that's my alma mater, and I majored in economics while there, and thus know well just how very extremely non-marxist the orientation of the economics department (when I was there, I had to take a course at another university so as to learn the Marxist critique of the US system, which I thought to be important to round out my understanding of the content area; and I was not able to count the credits toward the major)... I bit. That course was offered once by a visiting professor in 2014 by --- as you note -- the philosophy department, not the content area being "critiqued" Critical theory just means "closely examining assumptions and premises and omissions and missing people along the way." That's it. All else is commentary (or furious backlash at the suggestion episodes like the Tulsa Race Massacre should be covered as part of our history). Charlie Sykes (who was once counted, and still counts himself, as "conservative") did a succinct little roundup a few weeks ago on how the label is being instrumentalized by opponents that I found very instructive. "Both sides" and all that.
    7 points
  33. good! I was so awful today. A selfish glutton, actually. So I was getting groceries and there, at check out, it caught my eye. A Snickers white chocolate bar. I can’t eat chocolate. Like even a tiny bit, lest I pay with a head banger headache. I’m also a candy snob. Most candy bars have, one by one, been ruined with changing recipes and no longer taste the same. If you’re older, like me, you know what I mean. So, I love Justin’s white chocolate peanut butter cups. I can’t always get to Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods to get the good stuff. I’m sick of Pay Day bars. So I grabbed it and thought it would be just another sub par tasting marketing attempt to make me buy. Just a bite to taste it and give the rest to dh. I thought just a bite would be okay, because today I had decided to get back to sticking more strictly with WFPB, after reading@happi duck’s thread and trying to encourage her and be supportive. I left that store and went to WF, where I bought a banana and pulled out a rice cake from my grocery bag to eat in the car for lunch. Doing well today, I thought. Got home and began putting away groceries. I came across the candy bar and thought I would stop for just one sec and have that one bite, just knowing it wouldn’t taste so great anyway. Goodness. That thing went way above any expectations and then some. I had a second bite. There were two big pieces in the package, so I decided to eat just one big piece. Each bite was delicious. I could not believe how good this thing was. Like, amazingly good. I set the other piece aside, and I put more groceries away. I ended up eating the whole thing. Somehow I just found myself ripping the rest of the wrapper open and yanking out the other piece. I have so much remorse. I didn’t share. I messed up my healthy eating plan. I made myself sick. So despicable. Despicable me. But I want each and every one of you to know….. Snickers white chocolate bars are so very, very good. I will buy dh another one next week.🙁
    7 points
  34. Bingo. Having been raised with the assumption that I would have a "career," I was shocked out of my mind to discover -- almost in retrospect -- that the best "job" I've ever had was raising and educating my kids. Although I stumbled into it, homeschooling was absolutely my vocation, and I am still struggling to accept that nothing else will ever be as (hard, frustrating, exhausting) meaningful for me.
    7 points
  35. I’m a cradle Catholic who left as a young adult, identified heavily with atheism for awhile which gave way to agnosticism. I’ve recently returned to regularly attending the Catholic Church but I’m quite comfortable with disagreeing with the church. As a child and young adult I read the Bible a lot but never regarded it as historically factual. In fact, I think a lot of the meaning is lost if it is taken as literally true. I can learn something about life from the story of Jonah without thinking that a man lived in a whale for 3 days.
    7 points
  36. I'm glad you enjoyed your treat. It also pains me to see just how many times you cut yourself down in one post. 😢😢 Please be kind to yourself. ❤️ You're allowed to enjoy a treat all to yourself. You're allowed to make a "diet mistake". You're allowed to be human. And through it all, you deserve grace, compassion, and kindness.
    7 points
  37. So it is as I first thought.....all of this screaming about CRT taking away rights and making children hate themselves for being white has nothing to do with what CRT actually is.
    6 points
  38. I am not an expert on this, but it appears the course you linked to has nothing to do with critical race theory. There are different kinds of critical theory, looking at all sorts of things. I agree with you that some parents probably would see this, be confused, think that critical race theory must be Marxist, and get upset. Those parents would be wrong, but that wouldn't make them less upset. I'm not at all concerned, and would be rather pleased, about school kids being well taught ideas from critical race theory. What I'm worried about is what they will be taught by confused teachers on various sides of the issue. Most of us have a story about something dumb a well-meaning but confused teachers told us. There's so much misinformation going around I'm worried that will happen in this area. For example, I've heard lots of people, including teachers, claim that kids aren't allowed to have Bibles at school. This is false, but some teachers will tell kids this anyway, or that they aren't allowed to mention God in public school assignments. In those areas that have passed laws and resolutions intended to ban the "dangerous ideas of CRT," the things listed in the law/resolution are, in the ones I've read, not actual things that someone who has studied CRT would say. Instead, they are a list of crazy things people are worried that CRT might be. This means that CRT hasn't actual been banned at all, but how many teachers are going to be confused and tell kids "you can't say that," when the kids bring up the moral conflict if the founding fathers owning slaves? Or how many parents will complain to the principal if teachers mention race at all?
    6 points
  39. First of all, I don’t consider 70 to be particularly elderly. Secondly, plenty of younger people are very susceptible to misinformation, and plenty of seniors are still sharp as a tack. Generalizing about mental capacity just because a person has reached a certain age is not a nice thing to do.
    6 points
  40. The real problem is that if it weren't for their need to throw a fit, they wouldn't normally know what books were on their child's classroom curriculum or even that a list existed at all.
    6 points
  41. I assume you meant me. And yes, you picked a deeper and more nuanced article to quote (I didn’t go through the OP’s links), but the base still holds. History (and law and many policies) is/are inherently biased. In a classroom it’s going to be seen mostly in a history curriculum. But it might apply on any topic of race. In many cases the issue is more generational poverty than it is race, but you can find bias & racism nearly everywhere. Fox News would like to deny this, or pretend people stating this are just victims, but it isn’t true.
    6 points
  42. I, too, think you need to rule out seizures. Seizures don't always look like what we think they look like - and the fact that he's great at understanding his internal body cues does not mean he wasn't having an aura. Both things can be true at the same time. I hope you get an accurate answer soon.
    6 points
  43. Tomorrow we're having Dairy Queen Blizzards for dinner! 😛 "Light, quick and easy summer fare" - it counts, right?
    6 points
  44. He knew it was going to happen. That concerns me for both neuro and even cardiac related. An EEG will see any strange activity going on in the brain even if it’s not full seizure level.
    6 points
  45. I think this post and Ordinary Shoes post is combining denominations in a way. Reform Jews are usually not observant meaning that they do not literally follow the 613 commandments and usually are not kosher. Yes, literal interpretations of the Torah are not necessary or common but that it because they are being seen as a guide to teach moral lessons on how to be a better person. I think this point is important to me because I often see posts here with people saying that they know someone Jewish but they are not very religious because they aren't kosher or don't appear to observant. Basically more like how Orthodox Jews appear. To be honest it is sort of offensive to me as a Reform Jew. I feel I am religious because of my faith, my views and my religious education. Being similar to a completely different denomination of my religion does not make me more Jewish. It is like saying a Protestant isn't very religious because their mass isn't in Latin.
    6 points
  46. Literally any color will look good. What’s his favorite color? I always choose white towels, so they can be bleached if necessary.
    6 points
  47. I like the ear cuff idea, because there are a lot of fun options, yet when she gets sick of them, she stops wearing them, and that’s it. She will have no permanent holes or scars. She is only 14. The permanent edgy thing she loves now may be her biggest regret by the time she’s 20.
    6 points
  48. Wow, what a jack hat! Ds worked at McDonald's before and although it was busy it was a good job because as you said corporate has good policies. He got regular breaks. Discount on his food and even free food often (not great food to me but he is a teen). Little Caesar's doesn't give any discount. I know many snub their noses at fast food work but I'm proud of him for working hard. There isn't much else listed here for beginning workers. He tried Home Depot but didn't get hired and I don't have any connections that are looking to hire.
    5 points
  49. I really wouldn't count Milo Yiannopoulos as an exemplar of what Christianity is. Or what any other group of people is either, for that matter. That is one Cheese who Stands Alone, LOL. What is fueling what seems (?) to be a sense that you/your family need to "join" a religion, as opposed to just... showing up and seeing how it goes? In my synagogue there are tons of folks who just fellow-travel, for years/decades. Some eventually formally join, some through conversion; but plenty others don't. Similarly I know several women who regularly "attend" Quaker meeting but have not "joined." There's no need to plunge first; shopping, it's a thing.
    5 points
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