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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/21/2021 in all areas

  1. After I recommended a scooter (and her refusing) she showed up at the park with a scooter. 🙂 She was able to do so much more with the kids. They did leave but they got to do a lot more with them yesterday than they had any other day. She seemed happier than I’ve seen her in awhile.
    15 points
  2. Now I just hope everyone else involved is agreeable to it! (Tuesday) It’s been a long day. Walked through the property to see everything staked out. Moved the driveway to save some maple trees. Discovered a bear’s recent picnic spot. Probably the same bear our project manager ran into earlier this week! Then we went and finalized all our details. Amazingly, we’ll be getting some credits back because some new options came in for standard level stuff, and some upgrades were downgraded to standard due to availability. A nice perk, considering there’s no real telling how long this is going to take at this point. It may be as long as a year now. Which is disappointing, but not as disappointing as never would be!!! My most shocking (to me) choice? I went with black cabinets. I was planning for white, but the door style I liked best came in (price included) black, and the (more expensive) white paint didn’t come in my preferred door style. Didn’t pick bathroom lights and faucets because new options are coming in. And went with standard light fixtures in the rest of the interior because it’s cheaper to just replace them ourselves. Otherwise, we’re pretty much done with decisions for quite a few months now. As far as extra land clearing, our builders won’t participate in anything more than necessary clearances because they’re afraid of dealing with the conservation district. Which is sort of a bummer, but I’ll do whatever it takes to get them moving with less red tape and deal with it later. They *will mow down the scrub brush for us, and that will give us a better look at the remaining *real trees so we can make a better plan. And that’s where we are with that!
    13 points
  3. I don't agree with everything said in this thread, but gosh, y'all. It's like, a mostly civil thread about Palestine and Israel with voices of actual Jewish folk that's focused mostly on how it's a complex issue. Truly the WTM is magic. For me, I'm both super concerned about the staggering rise in anti-Semitism in the US and the world in the last few years that underscore the need for a Jewish state. And I'm deeply upset by the asymmetrical actions of the Israeli government that essentially amount to war crimes in some cases.
    12 points
  4. As someone who teaches little kids, who were mostly in school/daycare, and had excellent attendance and never had even a cold myself, I am crediting the masks, handwashing, and greater spacing in the room. Because I never got sneezed on by a child, not even when one of my four year olds had "allergies" and was snotting up a storm. The kid went through four masks in a 30 minute lesson, but it didn't get all over me or the piano. I am really hoping that if I have cute masks available and encourage it, kids will be willing to mask during cold and flu season in future years. I've discovered that the Asian grocery stocks child sized disposable ones with little pandas, dinosaurs, Hello Kitty, etc, and my kids have been more than willing to get a fresh one if needed, so I am hoping that will continue in future cold and flu seasons.
    11 points
  5. Without getting into any sort of details - because gosh, that's a tricky subject - it's important to remember that "Jewish" and "Israeli" are not synonyms and, for that matter, that Israelis are no more or less likely to agree with their government on everything their government does than Americans are. It is extremely important to be clear on this topic.
    11 points
  6. Here is my perspective. I am not religious, but am interested in all three Abrahamic faiths on an intellectual level and have studied all in depth. I grew up with many Jewish friends, consider myself "Jewish adjacent" and have been named an (unofficial) honorary Jew by rabbis in three different branches of Judaism--from ultra-orthodox to reform (liberal). I studied international relations in university with an emphasis in the Middle-East. My closest college friends went to Lebanon to cover the turbulence prior to the 1982 war with Israel. My plan was to join them, but the conflict broke out before I could do so. My college cohort included a future (and current) UN ambassador from a neighboring Arab country, many other Arabs from Palestine, Israel, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia as well as many American Jews who ranged from strong Zionists to strong anti-Zionists. My two best college friends remained working journalists in the region. I've studied the history of the region in depth. Learned to speak and write rudimentary Arabic. Have met with important leaders in the Palestine Authority and leading Palestinian intellectual figures. What can I say? Both people have legitimate narratives. Both have legitimate aspirations. Both bleed. Both have committed atrocities. Both have amazing human capital. Both have a lot of assholes in their midst. Neither people have been well-served by their leadership IMO. Hamas (a deliberate creation of the Israelis in large measure) is not a force for good. Likud is reprehensible. And the PA operates much like the Godfather. The two societies are highly diverse and mirror one another (very strongly) and in many ways are more alike across cultures that within their own group. Both have educated individuals with liberal outlooks and both have narrow minded maximalists who want no concessions. The situation keeps getting pushed to the extremes and that's not an accident. Hamas and Netanyahu each find it in their interest to have the situation inflamed. It is neigh on impossible to have nuanced discussion online, and I may end up regretting this post. For Americans to jump in and support one side while demonizing the other only add to the extremism and isn't helpful IMO. Both peoples have compelling narratives. As to right-wing Christian support for Israel on some sort of theological basis, remember that many see Israel as something that's a precondition to their millennial hopes for a "second coming," but also remember that the Jews who don't convert upon Jesus' return are earmarked to burn in hellfires for eternity. Is that "friendship," or something else? Bill
    11 points
  7. I think if we can stay/become a society where it's socially unacceptable to be in public places while sick (instead of stuff like perfect attendance and not taking sick days being valorized) and where it's expected to wear masks much more frequently, we can save a ton of lives and keep a ton of people out of the hospital every year. One thing I've learned this year is how rarely it actually is "just allergies" for me. ETA: of course a lot of the responsibility for it becoming socially unacceptable to be out when sick lies with employers and with policies around sick leave, not with individuals.
    10 points
  8. Are you saying that an organization founded by Jonas Salk wouldn’t have their own reasons for correcting something that was being misinterpreted to mean a vaccine was unsafe? To me this seems like a case where scientists wrote something that was clear to other scientists, but was confusing to some lay readers, and might have contributed to vaccine refusal. So they added text to clarify the message for those lay readers. Yes, ideally, they should have put a footnote that additional text was added for clarity, but it’s hardly a conspiracy. But then I can’t really read the first entry, which says that a virus with an attached spike protein is able to enter cells more easily, as meaning that a spike protein that is not attached to a virus is dangerous. It’s like learning that some criminals wear sneakers so they can get into your house silently, and then becoming afraid of the sneakers in your closet.
    10 points
  9. That is interesting. All I can think is maybe it’s unvaccinated people wanting to protect themselves from all the vaccine supposedly floating through the air 🤷‍♀️😂.
    9 points
  10. No. Not necessarily at all. I think this is your bias coming through, wanting to pin any flare on the vaccine. Those of us who live with AI illnesses and other illness that flare occasionally know it doesn't work like that. I suspect that few of us live such simple lives that we could accurately, unequivocally say that a vaccine caused a flare or not. I know I would have to consciously attempt to live a perfect life for several days before and after to be able to even have a small chance of determining that. A "perfect life" would mean enough activity but not too much, nothing at all that caused any of my muscles or joints to tense up in the least, enough sleep, no stress at all, etc. Let me give you an example. Let's say I got my first vaccine and had an RA flare afterwards. Now maybe it was the vaccine. But after the appointment I had to drive home in a pounding rain. Really heavy stuff, to the point that multiple times I considered pulling over somewhere and waiting it out. But I chose to drive on. I was tense. Hands clenched on the wheel, overall body tension. If I had flared afterwards I'd have no way of knowing whether it was from the vaccine or from being so tense from driving in a torrential downpour. History tells me the latter can cause a small flare, but I have no experience with flares after vaccines (including very recent experience with the Shingrex vaccines). But OTOH the experts tell me the Covid vaccines can trigger flares. So . . how do I decide? I can't. I could choose one or the other, but it would be bias driving the choice. So I say I can't decide, I don't know which caused it. I'm not going to say it was the vaccine or it wasn't. Either way would just be guessing.
    9 points
  11. Jordan currently houses 2 million Palestinian refugees, making up 20% of their population, plus about 2 million more from Syria and Iraq. I think it's fair to say that Arab countries take in more than their share of refugees.
    9 points
  12. Just a jumping off point for my musing…I don’t want or plan to mask all of the time, or want others to. I’d love it if masking could become the normal thing for someone to do when they are out and sick. Little Johnny threw up last night but you all just had to come to church today? Mask. You’ve been sick but want to try to come to co-op anyway and plan to just leave early if you start to feel bad? Mask. Running into the store to get meds for your cold because you’re the mama and no one else can go. Mask. Also at the doctor. How many times have I taken a kid to the doctor for something mild and everyone gets the flu? Can we also keep up waiting in our car instead of germy waiting rooms? I ❤️ that. I could also see masking myself when I have something is coming up that I’d rather not miss due to illness, like a trip, or before a friend or family members birth if I want to see the baby, or on an airplane or other known vector for disease.
    8 points
  13. I just went shopping up in 'live free or die' NH yesterday, where I think the mask mandate has been largely dropped, although I'm not sure if it's still in effect for the city of Nashua, where they've been generally more strict. Anyway, happy to see not a single unmasked person, not even outside in the Home Depot garden center...
    8 points
  14. Have you seen the charts though? This was way beyond a light flu year. There were just enough cases to show there was a tiny amount circulating, but it was a flat line at the bottom of the chart (I will try to insert a flu chart). There was a single pediatric flu death, compared to the usual ~150-190. I agree we can’t know which elements contributed most to that, but it was obviously something. I do expect lack of travel helped a lot. Especially in Southern Hemisphere countries. The other interesting (but in a bad way) aspect of the almost non existent flu season is to see how flu was so suppressed, but Covid still managed to rage. Demonstrates how much more contagious than flu it is.
    8 points
  15. I would push for him to be able to accompany her as a CAREGIVER, not just as a visiting spouse. I would be tempted to remind them of how they could be sued for "losing" a patient with dementia. The caregiver in this situation is necessary for her safety and well-being.
    8 points
  16. What you are describing IS dementia. This is a squeaky wheel situation. Tell her doctor the incidents you described here without downplaying them. Insist on a buddy for your mom up the chain of command. Fwiw most of the cognitive tests a regular GP does are nearly worthless until the patient is so far down the dementia path it’s obvious to everyone. I’d get a neurologist and a geriatric specialist on board with more thorough testing and assessment.
    8 points
  17. Yep! Still only 4. Is a homeschool forum the only place people say “only 4”?
    7 points
  18. I saw an interesting article in the Washington Post today breaking out the case numbers across the country to show what they actually are as a portion of the unvaccinated population in each area. What it showed, is that the risk level to unvaccinated people is still the same as it was during the January surge in many places across the country right now. It's much lower for the vaccinated, but unvaccinated people might be getting a false sense of security by looking at the case numbers averaged over the whole population, but it's a much different story when looking at them as a proportion of unvaccinated people. https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/interactive/2021/covid-rates-unvaccinated-people/
    7 points
  19. Yes. Canada has had 68 lab confirmed flu this season for the whole country. Usual annual numbers are approx 50,000. That's a nearly thousand-fold decrease. Three orders of magnitude. And 31 of those 68 cases were associated with viral shedding secondary to live attenuated vaccine (ie Flumist), and hence do not represent community acquired flu: "To date this season, 68 influenza detections have been reported (Figure 2), which is significantly lower than the past six seasons where an average of 49,641 influenza detections were reported for the season to date. All provinces and territories are closely monitoring indicators of influenza activity this season. Data in the FluWatch report represent surveillance data available at the time of writing, and may change as updates are received. Thirty-one of the influenza detections reported to date this season are known to be associated with recent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) receipt and do not represent community circulation of seasonal influenza viruses. LAIV strains are attenuated but can be recovered by nasal swab in children and adults following vaccination with that product (i.e., "shedding")
    7 points
  20. I’m curious why you think that Arab countries don’t take in Palestinian refugees. Is that something you see reported in the news you follow, or is it something you’ve been told? I’m always surprised when I hear people say this when it’s so easily disproven. (I’m really not trying to get you here, or make a point. I just wonder where people think the over five million Palestinian refugees are living if they’re not in Arab countries.)
    7 points
  21. Israel certainly can unilaterally stop building on disputed territory, and stop supporting illegal settlements. Israel certainly can unilaterally return lands that were taken from Palestinians and are still unoccupied - that's easy to do, you're not displacing anybody new. Israel certainly can unilaterally decided to vaccinate everybody within its borders in a sensible fashion, which would not only have been more ethical but would also have been smarter, because viruses don't care why you're unvaccinated!
    6 points
  22. Good advertisement for the flu shot. 😉 It would be cool if we could get to a point where people mask when they don't feel well, or they mask proactively, say, it's near a major holiday, and they mask to avoid catching something that they'll pass along to family. I think it would also be nice for it to be seen as not unusual to mask. Those who want to mask even more often are free to do so.
    6 points
  23. OP, I recently read City of a Thousand Gates by Rebecca Sacks. It's a fictional account of life in Jerusalem and an adjacent camp, both Israeli and Arab. There are all sorts of characters that interact: an American Jewish woman married to an Israeli, a German freelance journalist, an Israeli settler soccer player, an Arab Israeli soccer player, a Palestinian professor of English and male and female Palestinian college students. It covers the reaction to the murder of a Settler girl, the retaliation against a Palestinian boy who had nothing to do with that and the violence that ensues. The book gives a good overview of the complexity of the situation while still being a good story that you will want to read. The author is an American who got her MA in Tel Aviv, so she has experience living in Israel but the emotional distance to see the conflict as a third party rather than a participant. If you're up for a non-fiction account, I'd highly recommend Rise and Kill First by Ronen Bergman, an Israeli journalist who got some amazing interviews with Mossad and Israeli Defense Force sources. It traces the history of Israeli's targeted assassination program and explains its unintended consequence of constantly pushing Palestinian politics to more extreme positions. This book was on a lot of Best Books of 2019 lists because of its startling revelations and the careful analysis of the consequences of Israeli policy.
    6 points
  24. I had the same sort of thing-hives for several days following the vaccine dose. But, I have hashimoto's, and I'm one of the lucky people who gets hives as a result when my immune system is upset at all. So, while I reported them to VaxSafe, mentally I'm considering that a side effect of Hashimoto's, not necessarily the vaccine. Because yeah, that's a logical reason for my immune system to be upset, but I'm getting the same symptoms now, and it's probably because we have L's grad party tomorrow!!
    6 points
  25. This is part of the microchip conspiracy theory. That is where it comes from. No, it’s not true. Eta: I feel like I have to add a disclaimer anytime I reply to something Pen writes, because she won’t see my reply. In fact, the subject of this thread is addressed in a reply I wrote to her when she shared that Salk Institute article the other day. I replied about the parenthetical statement in the article explaining that the vaccine induced spike proteins behave differently. But she didn’t see that since I’m on ignore. Anyway, I reply for the sake of others reading the thread, but if anyone is conversing directly with Pen in these threads, she’s not seeing the same information you are, so you might need to repeat some things if I was the one who said them.
    6 points
  26. Someone needs POA, but do NOT start throwing around the word dementia BEFORE getting POA, otherwise you may have to have someone (you or your dad) made her “conservator” or guardian—which is a more complicated process both in becoming conservator and being conservator. Regardless, either POA or conservatorship is going to be needed at some point from what you are describing. Don’t put it off if at all possible because she’s probably okay at the moment to sign POA . (I know it’s so hard to talk to parents about these things).
    6 points
  27. Thank you for all the suggestions. My Mom got through her appointment ok and made it to my Dad in the building lobby by herself. She texted my Dad throughout the appointment to let him know her status. That's the first time she's done that. I like the Facetime idea and will suggest that to my parents. That would ensure my Dad gets the correct information from the medical staff and my Mom doesn't leave something out (ie. forget). My Mom will not ride in a wheelchair. She absolutely refuses and my Dad doesn't force it. He chooses his battles with her and that's not one he's willing to fight. But if she would ride in a wheelchair, it would change everything. And it would make these appointments a lot easier. I will talk to my Dad about referencing himself as her "caregiver" and not just her spouse. He needs to push that. Thank you again.
    6 points
  28. The release links to the journal article the paper is based on, which gives more details. Pen didn’t link, but here’s the release again: https://www.salk.edu/news-release/the-novel-coronavirus-spike-protein-plays-additional-key-role-in-illness/?fbclid=IwAR2OuJNufIY33MSFrk0CXAGtkx8KBW3_xW3aAr3UHWhICa6GQjTPx28ccXY And here’s the paper: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.121.318902 The people spreading the original version of the Salk media release didn’t spread the link to the paper was based on, because this was the conclusion in that paper: “This conclusion suggests that vaccination-generated antibody and/or exogenous antibody against S protein not only protects the host from SARS-CoV-2 infectivity but also inhibits S protein-imposed endothelial injury.” So, the paper suggests that the vaccine is actually protective against the kind of injury that the virus associated spike protein can produce. A correction notice at the bottom would’ve been nice, but I don’t see what specifically it is that has people upset about that in this one specific instance. I don’t see what nefarious reason anyone could come up with for them to make the change. I guess, thinking about it, people may be upset because they’ve been spreading the article around and then, lo and behold, they’re finding the article doesn’t support the narrative they are trying to promote. Side note: The paper this is based on is way above my pay grade, and I don’t claim to even be able to pretend to understand the whole paper. I expect that’s the case for 99.99%+ of the people drawing erroneous conclusions based upon it.
    6 points
  29. Kath, get her off the Benadryl. Nobody her age - especially if they are showing signs of dementia! - should be on routine Benadryl. Talk to your father, have him talk to the doctor and get some other sleep aid. She needs to STOP taking Benadryl.
    5 points
  30. And now c+p isn't working again. So, few things. 1. While I understand the argument "rising anti-semitism underscores the need for a Jewish state", I think it's a mistake. A real one, and not just because I'm leery of anything that provides cover to those same white supremacists who want their own ethnostates. Putting aside literally everything but pragmatics, I just think it's a very bad idea to cram the majority of the Jewish population into an area of land the size of New Jersey, precisely *because* lots of people hate the Jews. I think that this, first of all, undermines the argument that Jewish people have a right to exist, and be Jews however they want to be, wherever they happen to go but, more importantly, that if somebody with enough animosity was able to get together the force, they're one small target. Dispersion is a better, safer bet. I'm sure of it. Doesn't matter how good your army is if the other side decides to zerg rush you, or says "Ah, heck with it" and launches a couple of nukes. 2. As for "what should Israel do next" - well, let's be clear on a few things. A. There is more than enough blame to pass around here. It's not just Israel and Palestine sharing the blame, you can pile it on to all their neighbors, to everybody who occupied that patch of land in the past 150 years or so, and to everybody who was happy to let the status quo remain quo so long as they never had to think about it. a. And also Hitler. We can *definitely* blame him. B. Whatever you think of the founding of Israel, it's not going anywhere now. Anybody who's idea of peace somehow involves Israel not being there probably *is* anti-Semitic, and either they really just like to watch the world burn or they're absolutely deluding themselves. C. The various surrounding nations which have Palestinian refugees need to get their collective acts together and stop refusing to give citizenship to those refugees born on their land. Or, if they're gonna keep on dragging their feet, they need to collectively cede a bunch of land to those refugees for keeps. "Oh, if we give them citizenship they'll stop fighting for their homeland!" Yeah, well, suck it up. It's been 75 years. D. So do the most recent people who managed that territory before it was given to Israel - which would be Turkey and England, I guess. Sorry, Palestinians are part of the Commonwealth, deal with it. E. Israel needs to stop illegally expanding its borders, and stop building on occupied territory. I'm not saying it has to cede all its settlements - though if the government paid people to move, just like the US pays people to move out of flood zones, that'd be great - but it has got to stop building new ones. The argument is that they have to build those settlements to reinforce their defense, but how's that been working for them these past few generations? If it doesn't work, and it doesn't work, and it doesn't work - maybe more of the same is just not the answer! F. Israel also needs to come up with some sort of reparations plan for people who had their homes confiscated any time since their founding, and stop generally mistreating Palestinians and Palestinian citizens. This isn't rocket science. Speaking of which... G. Geez, both sides need to stop lobbing rockets at each other. It doesn't help. You'll notice that I put more emphasis on what Israel needs to do than what Hamas needs to do. This is because Israel has the bulk of the power here. It has nothing to do with whose hands are cleaner, because honestly, nobody's are.
    5 points
  31. re mostly civil and mostly cognizant of the duration, breadth and complexity of "the problem" Agreed. On duration - in my experience, when Jews and Muslims * attempt to broach "the problem" in reasonable depth/ good faith, one of the issues that emerges early is different perspectives on when the clock starts on the cycles of grievance and claim. The destruction of the temple? The completion of the Dome of the Rock on its ruins? The Crusades? Saladin? The Ottoman empire? Herzl? The colonial carve-up, generally? The British mandate, generally? The Balfour Declaration, specifically? 1948? 1949? 1967? 1973? Camp David? The first intifada? The Oslo Accords? And there are many other reasonable cases to be made for other junctures. Where we start the clock colors what we see. Similarly, breadth. This thread rests upon a premise that Israel came into statehood "because" of the Holocaust, and it is difficult to dispute that premise as realpolitk in real time. But 1948 was only one moment in long time; and the Holocaust differed only in SCALE, not in kind, from two long millennia of state enforced collective expulsion (including, for ~400 years, from Britain itself)/ systematic state-led property confiscation/ systematic state-led religious persecution & torture/ state-condoned pogroms leaving whole villages burned to the ground. That persecution reached back not only in time, but also across space. So while I do understand how, from the outside, it might look self-evident that Israel statehood was "given" to Jews as a sort of consolation prize after the Holocaust... from the perspective of a community persecuted / hounded / ransacked / tortured / killed anywhere, anytime, it never landed that way. It still does not. We have the right to a place where They do not try to kill us for living as Jews. That resonated throughout Europe in Herzl's time (even to Gentiles; thus the Balfour Declaration), and (as evidenced in this very thread) it still resonates today, where in 2021 many Jews wonder if we really are safe in America. And complexity. Other posters have addressed facets of that complexity between the Israeli state and Palestinians. There is also deep complexity between how "it" plays between Jews: between religious v secular Jews within Israel; between official Israel and American Jewish organizations; between more-progressive vs more-observant communities in the US; increasingly between the younger and older generations. * not all Palestinians are Muslims, but I have never personally had any conversations of any substance with non-Muslim Palestinians about "it."
    5 points
  32. Sorry, but I think you are seriously underestimating the rise of anti-Semitism among the BDS movement specifically and among the populist-left more generally. We on the left-of-center are pretty quick to condemn, ridicule, and vilify bigotry, lack of nuance, and unreasonableness when it comes from the far right, but tend to be blind (or silent) when the same things happen on the left. I find the rising anti-Semitism on the populist left to be real and deeply disturbing, myself. And as dangerous to liberalism as the threat from the far-right. Bill
    5 points
  33. Right, and correlation is not the same as causation. I broke out into hives a few days before my first vaccine. I did so because it's peak pollen season here, and I've been off my immunosuppressants since the beginning of April in prep for the vaccine. I also had a flare in the hours before that first dose. Right, there's no causation as no dose had been administered. But those symptoms could have just as easily started a couple of days later and I would have thought causation if I wasn't particularly attuned to this issue. Same deal round 2. The night of my second dose I ran a low grade fever and I felt a bit achey. This is exactly how I feel during a flare. I have no idea if one triggered the other or if both just happened to happen side by side. --------------- Same. The elementary was always out. The hand sanitizer stand outside of the cafeteria was present year round, but I NEVER saw sanitizer in it prior to covid despite checking several times a week. One of the things that has come out of covid is that everyone is sanitizing hands upon entering the building (don't think that will continue in the fall) and they bought several hand washing stations (I do hope that will continue). The current building design cannot accommodate kids washing their hands before eating or after return from recess without those additional stations. ------------------- It's the end of the week here. AFAIK, we went from fully masking everywhere indoors at the beginning of the week to only needing to mask in schools, at healthcare offices, Home Depot, and at one grocery store chain. Everyone here is largely unmasked. I'm super interested to see what happens with new infection rates this month. I think they will continue to decline as the weather is lovely and people are out a lot and we have had some decent vaccination numbers.....but I'm not too sure of my prediction.
    5 points
  34. I hope you're having a lovely time at Disney and making great memories. I lost both my inlaws over the last few years, and one of the things I realized each time in hindsight was that you make a funeral slideshow AFTER they're going instead of BEFORE when they could have actually enjoyed it. So I made a slideshow of my dad's photos a year or two ago (he's 70 now) and he LOVES it. If the pictures are not scanned, that would be something peaceful you could do together. Scan, talk about the pictures, then use Animoto and make a lovely video. https://animoto.com/ They make it easy and if you wait until you have the pictures scanned and then pay the fee for a month, it's not too bad. I'll link the one I made for my dad. He's declining, and when he passes I may or may not add a few pictures at the end to update it. I think you could do the same. Fwiw, going through the pictures might help you to work through the issues nagging at you. Sometimes when we see the pics and where they were coming from, we see things differently, with more context and our adult eyes.
    5 points
  35. I really wish that this forum would automatically lock threads after a certain period of inactivity.
    5 points
  36. My assumption would be the funeral was indoors (so that would have been a no from me) and the protest outdoors (so that would have been a yes). If it had specified an indoor protest and a graveside service of any type, that would have reversed the answers.
    5 points
  37. In Asian countries masking is the norm. I’ve never seen anything saying they have weaker immune systems generally. I wonder if there are studies on that. If masking to avoid illness lowered immunity in general, I wonder why we don’t see that as an issue with hand washing. That lowers our exposure to germs, so it should have same effect I would think. Are there cultures that don’t wash hands less frequently in general? I wonder if they have stronger immune systems. To the bolded, some doctors have speculated that masking does exactly that.
    5 points
  38. A Baby Yoda hand sanitizer carrier is my daughters most prized possession at the moment. She has the cleanest hands right now.
    5 points
  39. Thanks, this is helpful. I don't think I have OCD, but definitely some kind of anxiety thing. It's definitely stress and grief impacting my judgment, but I think the only cure for that is time. I actually am a lot better than I was, I just have a long way to go.
    5 points
  40. I agree with all of this. I definitely don’t agree at all with those who think this is going to be a side effect “caught” from vaccinated people by unvaccinated people, though. There is no mechanism for this. I also expect menstrual irregularities to be at least as common, if not more so, in those who actually have Covid. We know that illness can affect the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. To worry about the vaccine, which cannot cause this in anyone other than the vaccinee, but not about the virus makes no sense. Then again, I don’t consider it a worrisome vaccine side effect, either. It just means the immune system has been active.
    5 points
  41. I honestly don't think it (menstrual irregularity) showed up in the trial because the doctors didn't look for it. The few who might have experienced it probably shrugged it off. Women are used to not mentioning our cycles. I don't like the brush-off from the scientists saying it isn't related in at least some cases. Mine? Probably not related. Likely coincidental. Other people's? I believe some are vaccine-related side-effects.
    5 points
  42. There is a Krispy Kreme less than 10 minute walk from our house. My kid has gotten SO MANY DOUGHNUTS.
    5 points
  43. Me too. But that ain't happening. And--hate to say it--fascists are not limited to one side. Those who are inclined towards peace and mutual respect have been sidelined. It is tragic, as if/when Palestinians and Israelis come together, the possibilities are endless. Bill
    5 points
  44. That was my first suggestion....put her in a wheelchair and push her. Don't ask if you can go along, assume you can😀. I like the other ideas too.
    5 points
  45. "She is confused and cannot go alone." Rinse and repeat, throwing in the words "dementia" and "medically necessary" when needed.
    5 points
  46. I cannot emphasize enough how much people don't talk about CSA or DV. I can not emphasize enough how poorly many people react with people defy the social conventions and talk about it. I have had people decide that because I was willing to talk about it, that I was probably lying about it. Back in 1999, I was on the student council of my college. One of the perks was that there was an office for council officers and we each had a cubicle. Having access to a computer, comfortable chair and printer on campus without having to book computer lab time meant that I was in that office a lot. Like anytime that I wasn't at work or in class, I was probably in that office. I basically used it like a locker and private study room. There was another student on the council with me named Nolan. Nolan was in a class and heard statistics about the prevalence of sexual assault and didn't believe it. So he went on and on about it in that office for a long time. He kept saying he's never met ANY women who had been raped. And I listened to him go on and on on this without anyone really challenging him. I finally just said that since he'd met me, that was a totally false statement and why would he suppose that he would know about me or anyone else because it's not like we advertise this fact broadly as a general rule? That was actually the very first time I had told a male person and the first time I had told someone who was not very close to me or a health care professional. I had had close friends in high school I never told. I had dated several young men and never told them. After that, I did mention it more but experienced the oh so fun shit of having more than one person doubt the veracity of my statements. ETA: when I told this to Nolan and whoever else happened to be in the office at the time, his reaction was one of shock. He didn’t seem to think that someone who was going to school full-time, working and was by all outward measures “successful” fit what he thought a victim would be like. As though I was supposed to be unable to recover or move forward in my life. It also came up that he was surprised because I was athletic and worked with a self defense organization. Uh, Nolan, let’s think for a moment why might self defense and punching people be my hobby? Some people are very certain that abuse and rape ruins a woman to the point that when they meet a survivor who doesn’t outwardly appear damaged or “ruined” it just doesn’t compute that that woman could be living with ongoing abuse or living in the aftermath of abuse.
    5 points
  47. I'm just go to throw this out here, and judge me if you will -- however badly one thinks of Israel's behavior right now, the last few years in the US has made me feel pretty adamant that it needs to exist. Jewish history is replete with situations where Jews were welcome until they were not. I do not know whether my kids have a future in the US. I really hope they do, since I don't actually want to move to Israel. But I need it to exist.
    5 points
  48. I literally draw a pair of axes and a circle every time I have to do certain trig things, even if all I do is stare at it while thinking.
    4 points
  49. My younger son *much* prefers to use trig tables over the calculator button. He feels like the calculator button is magic, a number pops out. It is just too easy to lose track of what you are doing and what it means. The tables allow him to see the relationship between all the angles and ratios, and reminds him about going both ways in a way that a calculator never does. As for logs, I make him estimate the answer before he hits the button, even for base e. I allow him to use a graphing package on the computer to graph most functions because he likes to explore what happens when you change different pieces of the equation. I feel like this improves intuition rather than reducing it because he is using a technological assist rather than graphing everything by hand. My older son is not allowed a calculator on any of his math or physics exams at University. And the numbers are not always nice. He told me that he does have to do a decent amount of long multiplication and division for certain physics exams. He is expected to be able to do it at speed (one time the professor gave the kids 20 extra minutes when he realized that the numbers were particularly messy, but still didn't allow a calculator). My guess is that the profs care less about multiplication and division and more about having the intuition to deal with square roots, logs, and obviously fractions. Take the calculators away and it forces kids to get fast and intuitive. They should be able to estimate first so they can confirm their answers make sense. Calculators undermine this intuition.
    4 points
  50. I teach beginning readers, which means I read invented spelling at a professional level.
    4 points
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