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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/11/2021 in all areas

  1. Miracle update. Dd was walking by her high school gym that is being used as a vaccination site and a nurse called out to her asking if she wanted the vaccine or knew anyone who did because they had leftover doses. She called home, we got ds there lightning fast and he was vaccinated. Praise Jesus!
    16 points
  2. This thread is ridiculous. I can't believe I just responded to anything in it. These answers are out there in so many places. I can't believe anyone is actually confused that colorblind ideology is a way of reinforcing racism or that there's a loaded history behind "colored" that isn't there with "people of color." You just don't want to know and don't want to be challenged at this point.
    14 points
  3. First off, it's all very well that you - and several other people in this thread - don't "like" labels. But it's deeply disingenuous to act like you cannot see visible differences between peoples. Skin color is not invisible to people with sight. We cannot help but see it. Children cannot help but see it. When we avoid discussing it, we're not avoiding actually seeing it and before you claim that you somehow miraculously do, think about how ridiculous that sounds. We also cannot avoid knowing it's there. Nor can we avoid the fact that racism exists. Saying "I don't like labels" does not erase racism. In fact, saying "I don't like labels" is a way to prohibit victims of racism from discussing racism. It says, I refuse to listen to you discuss race. Practically speaking, if we do not discuss race - or ethnicity, poverty, gender, language, hair color, genetic mutations, disabilities, whatever - any differences between peoples that exist - then it is impossible to know if there are problems specific to those groups. If people with red hair turned out to be more susceptible to a particular cancer, then how does it help us fight that cancer for the medical researchers to say, "Oh, I don't like to label people by hair color," and then refuse to do any studies to figure out why gingers are dying of a particular cancer more than other people? That would be a ridiculous thing to assert and do. Yet, by saying "no labels" that's what you and others ask of research. Oh no, we aren't allowed to ask if one group is disproportionately affected by something. That might remind us that there are differences and that would be uncomfortable? Why? Discussing race is not a form of racism. Race exists as a concept. People ignoring that it exists only reinforces its power.
    14 points
  4. Let's not forget that this isn't just about politics seeping into church, it's about the sex scandal cover up too. When the articles about her talk about her speaking up on behalf of sexual abuse victims, it's because male leadership in the SBC knew there were sex offenders in their midst and shoved it under the rug.
    11 points
  5. No, and honestly, the people who put forth that argument are talking in bad faith. If you think there's a serious opinion there, you've been taken in. Race is not a scientific concept, but it is one of the most important social concepts of our world. Race affects... everything. It affects everything. There are people in this world who would like to ignore that, who would like to pretend that race does not affect your odds of having a good life, of having your children do well. Those people are happy to co-opt the language of anti-racism activists for their own purposes, and one of them is trying to slide in this idea that talking about structural inequalities is actually racist because that means talking about race. And in order to convince people of that idea, they start by repeating, ad nauseum, that race isn't real, that talking about race is racism, that there's no non-racist way to bring up race. This is all a lie.
    10 points
  6. What I've seen is going from a family friendly experience focused on loving Jesus to a national, assertive, parapolitical organization.
    10 points
  7. I’ve been isolated for so long and Dh is out of town and the one kid who would entertain my snark is asleep. Pandemic has flooded my area with new residents. Like, dam breaking flood. Mostly from metropolitan areas. I try to retain some empathy, but I’m also getting old and snarkier, lol. A new person on FB posted a warning that she saw a skunk while walking her dog last night. We live in a forest. Our neighborhood, which remains mostly wooded, was carved into the middle of miles of wilderness. The thought that someone’s worried about skunks makes me worried about how they’re going to handle real spring, when the foxes, bears, bobcats, and all the other animals come out. The coyotes don’t usually come into the neighborhood, but can be spotted now and then on the outer properties, and their cries can be heard all day. We. Live. In. The. Forest. A skunk walking around at night, minding its business is going to be the least of your concerns, lady!
    9 points
  8. Not personally? I mean, not anyone, right? The word "white" has not historically been used to exclude anyone from various public facilities in this country.
    9 points
  9. Got my second Pfizer vaccine today. Easy least and my arm isn't even sure like it was for the first shot. I'm fact I had a headache all day from muscular stress and it went away after the vaccination. I'm hoping that I'll feel good tomorrow; I have a full day of school and volunteering.
    9 points
  10. I refuse to use Alexa or Siri because I do not want to contribute to the inevitable robot apocalypse.
    9 points
  11. @Bootsie I have severe allergies to lots of meds - very long list - among other things. I had my Pfizer shot today. We discussed ahead of time with the allergist, and she said to take our epipens and hang out for 30 minutes. She said it would be ok to take Benadryl ahead of time, but I did not. According to what she’s reading, most allergic reactions are because of the propylene glycol (like in. Colonoscopy prep or Miralax) and another ingredient whose name escapes me, it’s listed on the cdc website, I think. I will try to update this later with that info. Anyway, I am not allergic to either of those, and she encouraged me to get the shot. I react to everything, every shot with a big immune response. So my experience may differ from yours, but ... my arm felt warm fairly quickly, by 15 minutes it was noticeably sore. I had a few episodes of feeling light-headed (this could have been anxiety about having anaphylaxis, if you’ve been there too, you’ll know why). At 30 minutes, I just really wanted fresh air, so we left. By the time we got home 20 minutes later, I felt better. Now I am achey, tired, chills and a little feverish. All within the realm of normal, and not an allergic reaction. I hope tomorrow goes well for you!
    9 points
  12. It has to do with the history of how the terms have been used, not the terms themselves. So you're not going to find a logical explanation based on the grammar of the words.
    9 points
  13. Are these genuine questions or just ways to try and stir the pot? Like, is there actually a confusion that there's a historical basis for "colored" people that is rooted in a time of great racism but that "people of color" is a phrase that was invented and is pretty widely embraced by many non-white peoples? And am I actually seeing serious arguments for colorblindness here or is this just more stirring the pot? Like, seriously, I don't know at this point. Do people really not understand that naming skin color - something infants can see and react to - is not racist. Naming race is not racism.
    8 points
  14. My mother had her second Pfizer shot a week ago last Saturday. She reported severe joint pain on Monday or Tuesday following the shot. She said she felt so old & just could barely move. The following morning, she was back to feeling "normal." I'm so happy for her!
    8 points
  15. Sleep wasn't too bad actually. He didn't throw up after 11pm and he slept until 4, when he crawled into bed with me and promptly fell back asleep but kicked me too much for me to sleep. 😅 I went on the loveseat in our bedroom to sleep and did get more. I was afraid to move him.
    7 points
  16. I got the Pfizer shot on Monday; had some soreness at the injection site for a couple of days, it is almost gone now. No other side effects. It was the first day my tier opened up, I felt lucky to get in.
    7 points
  17. I thank Alexa sometimes. I've told her she's stupid before, too, and she apologizes and asks what she did wrong.
    7 points
  18. I thought it was tied a bit to people first language movement. People are people first. Some other people are people of color. Or people with disabilities (rather than disabled people). Or people who use wheelchairs (rather than wheelchair bound people). Using “people” serves to remind us that the key point is that people are people.
    7 points
  19. Phrases change over time. The correct term used to be colored person (as in preferred by the people it applied to). I think of the song "Runnin'" by Pharrell Williams where he makes the point that the preferred term at the time was "colored". But that is no longer the preferred term mainly because that term too became loaded with baggage like "colored only" counters and seats etc.
    7 points
  20. Through some good timing, a loophole, and other factors I won't go into, I was able to be vaccinated today. I'd feel guilty, but it's pretty easy here to get a vaccine now, and where I went in fact had zero wait and was well below capacity, so I don't feel badly I took a shot from others trying desperately to get them. And frankly, I was very grateful to get it now, rather than in a month, because they are getting ready to switch over to Johnson and Johnson at a lot of sites, and with my son being at risk, I want one more likely to prevent me from spreading it, not just me getting sick. Anyway, got it about 11:30am, and my arm started to get sore at the end of the 15 minute waiting period. Not bad, but noticable. Still not bad, but now I have a bit of a fever (5 1/2 hours later) and am feeling flushed - my face particuarly. A bit tired, bit of a headache. I was willing to write off the headache as allergies, mine are badly the last few weeks, but that wouldn't explain the fever or flushed feeling. My guess is that my immune system was already ramped up due to the stupid oak pollen everywhere so having a more extensive reaction than otherwise. Cause this seems quick? It's not bad, I still cleaned up some, put a roast in the instant pot, etc, but not going to workout type thing. Oh, appetite is off - didn't even finish my afternoon coffee. Ate a few popsicles though - those sounded good. Oh - it was Phizer vaccine.
    7 points
  21. https://www.christianitytoday.com/news/2021/march/beth-moore-leave-southern-baptist-sbc-lifeway-abuse-trump.html Staying away from the fact that some of her frustration has some ties to politics, is anyone else following this story? I have to say, it makes me feel more sane that I'm not the only one that feels like things have changed (the people in my church have definitely changed). I've gone to SBC churches for about 20 years (it's an increasingly common denomination here), and I am beyond frustrated myself and unsure of where I will land when I go back to live church after the pandemic. Mars, indeed. I don't intend for this to be an SBC bash fest or a JAWM. I am wondering if others are seeing the same shifts and/or similar shifts in their churches and are dismayed. Anyone else wondering where they might be going to church after the pandemic and coming up with a lot fewer options that they thought they had?
    6 points
  22. I would be very surprised if you live in a moderately sized city and don't have a SBC in your community. What's more likely is you have a stealth SBC. There's a trend of churches not advertising their affiliation with the SBC because they know there's a stigma and are afraid that it will affect who chooses to visit their churches. You may not know unless you dig into their bylaws. Southern Baptists are super into church planting and domestic mission fields- they are everywhere.
    6 points
  23. Focusing on intent relieves us of our duty to others. Focusing on impact relieves others of the burden we might otherwise place on them.
    6 points
  24. I think *maybe* you don't realize what bubbles some of us live in. I only learned that "colorblind ideology is a way of reinforcing racism" here, and it was only a few years ago. Should I have searched for and found out about that earlier? Probably. But I didn't. It wasn't because I didn't want to know and didn't want to be challenged. There are only so many hours in the day and frankly most of mine were spent on OCD-related behaviors before I was medicated. 🙂 IDK. I worried about asking the question about cultural appropriation in my thread because I thought people might think I was lazy and/or uneducated. But it helps to have friends explain things sometimes.
    6 points
  25. I guess Jesus wasn't allowed to be a member. 😞
    6 points
  26. Must be the chip being inserted. 🤣 (Kidding! I kid! No chip.) My arm is sore this morning, still. DH and my mom don’t feel a thing. My ILs didn’t feel a thing for either shot, nor did my two sisters or an elderly aunt and uncle. Two of my local friends had sore arms, like me, but that’s it. So I personally know 8 people without soreness, 3 with. I would not say this hurts more than other vaccines. It’s less than a tetanus shot. And less than the flu shot I had this past fall (that was a doozy for two weeks, swollen and bright red). I think our immune systems vary. Mine is wonky, and I always react to shots in a big way. Probably genetic as my father did as well. Maybe we are just talking about it more? I don’t usually mention my sore arms after shots.
    6 points
  27. So yesterday I said I had a low grade fever and felt yucky about 5 hours after vaccine. Fever only lasted a few hours, and was minimal - under 100 F. Was sleepy and slept hard last night, feel fine this morning other than sore arm. It it more sore than other vaccines I've had, was really hurting last night but didn't keep me awake or anything. Now only hurts when I raise arm over my head. I did move it as much as possible yesterday.
    6 points
  28. https://www.reuters.com/article/health-coronavirus-pfizer-israel-int-idUSKBN2B31IW?taid=604a10d0b7d77200018e3841&utm_campaign=trueAnthem:+Trending+Content&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter yay! According to Pfizer, Data from Israel suggests Pfizer biotech vaccine is 94pc effective at preventing transmission!
    6 points
  29. Law school is very competitive to get into. So while she may be able to get a “head start” and start undergrad somewhere early, she may be setting herself up to be a stronger candidate for law school and a stronger person if she slows down and does more of what matters now. Four years of Latin, detailed history classes, participation in extra curriculars related to debate and public speaking like mock trial, model UN, this type of thing, as well as the journalism that you mentioned she’s interested in, these are worth four years of her time. She can grow and develop with them, rather than just checking them off a list.
    6 points
  30. The only one I use is the Google Assistant on my phone. I tell her thank you sometimes, but most of the time she doesn't hear me because I don't make sure she's listening first. I'll say "thanks, Googs" sometimes. 😄 Recently one time I had had a longer conversation with her so at the end I hit the button and said "goodbye." She responded, "Have a great day, Inigo Montoya you killed my father prepare to die!" I had forgotten that's what I told her my name was. 😂
    6 points
  31. Can it be called respect if you have to actively avoid listening to their core beliefs in order to maintain it?
    6 points
  32. I have heard it said, they aren't worried about losing their religious freedom.....they are worried about losing their power.
    6 points
  33. Because language is arbitrary. Sorry, you're just not going to get a better answer than that, ever.
    6 points
  34. This just amused me. "Precise" definition for "ambiguous" loss.
    6 points
  35. I am sorry. I am in no way any kind of expert on psychology, but my limited understanding is that this is a very common response to an extended trauma. And I have heard some mental health experts say that they expect a massive need among health care workers after the worst of the covid crisis is over, for precisely this reason. Are there any counseling or other psychological services available through your work?
    6 points
  36. I also went through a very serious phase doubting my own faith because of the SBC. I grew up attending only SBC churches and we had to believe in a 7 day creation, evolution wasn’t real, dinosaurs never existed, etc. Then, you add on that you are only allowed to dance if married and never allowed a single drink (as well as many other crazy things like Cabbage Patch dolls and the Smurfs are evil), and it became too much as a young adult. I didn’t attend any church for several years and it was the absolute best thing for me because I realized I actually had a very strong faith and belief in all the things that actually matter. As an adult with a family we’ve found our way to the Episcopal church and it suits us well. Good for Beth Moore and I sincerely hope my own family of origin finds their way out of it too. They have become people over the last several years that I don’t really recognize. We had no trouble weathering me finding a new church home and believing different things until the last few years. Now, it’s just weird and uncomfortable because everything they believe seems to have become non negotiable for being a Christian.
    5 points
  37. As someone with ties to many countries, I have felt honored to wear clothing with roots in those countries. My experience has been that people often want to share their culture with others who appreciate it. My first yukata was given to me by a friend in Japan. In Austria, an older woman gave me her first dirndl because it no longer fit her. I think clothing worn with love and respect for the culture that produced it is usually appropriate.
    5 points
  38. Also this seems like the appropriate place for this meme
    5 points
  39. DH tested positive for Covid a month ago. We think he got it at work (office setting, lax mask usage). A co-worker was sick with cold symptoms and tested negative for Covid twice, but complained of extreme fatigue which seems odd for a cold. So we are guessing he was the culprit, but who knows. DH had a fever for a few days and was pretty tired, then just had a cough for another 10 days or so. The rest of us never had symptoms and tested negative twice. Dh isolated pretty completely and we were super careful. I am SO GLAD the rest of us didn’t get it.
    5 points
  40. I think your answer is that they mean different things: Colored people = historical term associated with segregation and Jim Crow. Anachronistic synonym for Black (or African American). Loaded and offensive term People of Colour = modern term used to refer to racialized people (people who aren't racially white), as an aggregrate. Not a synonym for Black - encompasses all racialized groups. Modern inclusive term.
    5 points
  41. I'll bite. As a member of the Osage nation and married to a Cherokee neither of us are bothered by the term tribe. Yep. Native Oklahoman here in both senses of the word. Native American, Indian and tribe are okay with me. Dh strongly dislikes the term indigenous peoples and would much prefer to be called Indian or Native American.
    5 points
  42. I don’t think anything of the way I speak to Alexa....until someone not in my family hears me talk to her. When I’m alone or with the family, I issue commands at her like an empress. But if we have a guest and I need to tell her to turn on the lights, issuing commands feels tyrannical, so speak gently to her.
    5 points
  43. Or the midwest. I saw, “We don’t own one,” and my jaw dropped. We own several. We own swatters, bug candles, and electrifying rackets. Granted, we live down the road from a hig confinement unit AND we have a bajillion kids running in/out all day long. 😂 ETA: I agree they are gross. You know what’s really disgusting? Fly poop on doorways, fly poop on walls, fly poop on light fixtures... Yes, I have painted a ceiling just because I despise fly specks.
    5 points
  44. Just be aware that not all DE is equivalent. You need to ask yourself how rigorous this work is. To transfer credits was a huge effort for us as it was clear that his university has found that lots of DE was not up to snuff. We had to provide not just his grade, but a course outline, the textbook and edition, the exact pages covered, the midterm and exam, a statement from the professor that it was closed book and taken under time pressure. So you may be finding DE easier than AP because it may actually be easier, and the universities she applies to may know that. In the end, my son found that DE was not worth his time (even though our local university is well respected), so he only had 2 DE and 3 AP-equivalent courses (we are outside the USA). The rest of his classes were homegrown and focused on his interests. He stood out because of all the international competitions he was invited to. Be warned, the competition is fierce, and getting fiercer. But more classes or more DE don't make you stand out. You need something besides standard school-directed academics.
    5 points
  45. Yesterday I drove DH 81.5 miles--one way--to get a vaccine in a small town. We live in a major metropolitan area and have a mass vaccination site within two blocks of our house, a medical school within 2 miles, and a major medical center within 3 miles of our hosue. Although he is over 70, and has been on those waiting lists since December/January, he was still way down on a waiting list to even make an appointment. He received Pfizer; he has a second dose scheduled in three weeks in the same location (we will see if we can find something closer for the second dose). Wouldn't you know it--on the drive back he got a text from the county saying that he could schedule an appointment at a center (that would have been only 30 miles away) for next week. Just in the last 30 minutes I received a notification from my employer that I can receive a vaccine tomorrow from their supply. It will be Johnson and Johnson.
    5 points
  46. Thank you for taking the time to share that info. Seeing that, do you mind if I share an alternative perspective to what you are currently thinking? Yes, your dd is advanced, but equally, based on what you shared as what she has currently taken DE, I wouldn't classify her as so advanced that I would think that she is going to be a shoo-in competitive level, even in 2 yrs. She has taken the equivalent of 2 AP level course or perhaps only 1/2 of 2 AP courses. (Did she take 2 semesters of American history and 2 of European? Their AP equivalents are the equivalent of 2 semesters each, vs 1.) Competitive level admissions is pretty high stakes. It doesn't take a boatload of DE or AP courses to be competitive, but it does take "something." FWIW, here is my perspective as someone who has graduated 6 kids from their homeschool, 2 of them very gifted young adults. My ds graduated high school with something like 40 credits. He took his first alg course when he was 10. By the time he graduated from high school, he DEed for 4 math classes post AP cal BC (multivariable, DiffEQ 1 and 2, and linear alg) and 5 cal up based physics classes. Those physics classes were on top of classes like AP chem, AP equivalent bio (he didn't sit for this exam bc he didn't care and didn't need it for anything), and a 3 astronomy classes. He also had multiple classes each in subjects like philosophy, theology, Latin, French, computer science, etc on top of his 4 histories and Englishes. He also had multiple leadership roles, attended SSP (competitive summer science program), a national science essay honorable mention, on-campus research, etc. I considered him competitive. His biggest weakness was his ACT score which was higher than your dd's but not high enough to be truly competitive (truly competitive is 34+ and 34 is borderline competitive. (He is severely dyslexic and we didn't pursue extended time.) The thing about ds's application is that it screamed "I love physics and math." He was applying as a physics major. (I guess it isn't surprising that he is a 3rd yr physics grad student. 🙂 ) His application was 100% authentic him and his passion. Dd had a completely different approach and focus. She did not take any APs and only took 1 DE spring of sr yr (so no grade and obviously didn't influence her acceptances.) Here is where I completely differ from the advice HSLDA gave you. She was incredibly competitive (more so than her brother) and was accepted everywhere she applied and was awarded the top scholarship offered by several schools. Her transcript resembled her interests. She studied Russian, French, and Latin. She took French history in French. She read advanced levels of French lit in French (like Les Mis.) She had an English cr for Russian lit. She took Russian history. She had courses like Communism in the 20th Century. She translated a Russian fairy tale into English. She competed in multiple Russian competitions and won an international award for a B1 level Russian competition, multiple gold awards, best non-heritage speaker, and was part of the US team for an international olympiad. (She is now a college sr who majored in Russian and French.) I don't share that to discourage you at all!! I share it bc they did not stand out as at all unusual at scholarship interview weekends. The other applicants were every bit (and many were even more so) accomplished as these 2. Both of them could have graduated way earlier than they did. (As a matter of fact, dd was quite upset with us when she was 15 and we wouldn't let her grade skip and graduate a yr early. Afterward she was incredibly thankful that we didn't bc her international olympiad team was her sr yr.) But, competitive applications take high school accomplishments to a completely different level than advanced academics. It is a different process. In terms of the next tier down school.....academics are really all that matter and good academics and a test score like your dd's is all it takes. She will have zero difficulty achieving that goal just taking courses and continuing what you have described. Our family is very much like @Dmmetlerdescribed. We pursue scholarships. Our kids who have attend 4 yr Us have attended on full or close to full scholarship. What their achievements allowed the 2 I described do was have multiple options to choose from. They both received very large scholarships and have been part of specialized programs with additional benefits. But my college freshman had a far more typical high school experience with avg accomplishments and is still attending on scholarship and is part of her school's honors college. So, there is no single obvious path forward. THere is ZERO need to stress or attempt to conform to a single school's image of an applicant. She can just do her and have lots of options as long as she doesn't become wedded to a single school.
    5 points
  47. We have found that top universities are looking to see that the students are giving back to the community. Dance and music are still self serving. I know this because my son is a very accomplished violinist but his applications asked specifically for what he has done for others. I would suggest to save time, that you make the leadership that she does at the dance studio more official. Find out if she can be a mentor, or volunteer as a teacher for younger kids, or create and run an after school program in dance over the summer. (obviously, this is all covid related, but you have a few years). Top schools are looking to see that you can make things happen, that you can share your experiences and knowledge to help others. It looks far better if you can create these opportunities than to just join an existing group. My son created an olympiad math program at a local school rather than just offering to help out at the math camp. It shows that you are proactive and passionate. Do not overlook this. My older boy and I are now having to scramble to get this done for grad school applications and scholarships because we just didn't think about it earlier.
    5 points
  48. I left the SBC 20 years ago after two decades on that sinking ship. I don't know anything about Beth Moore. I haven't read her materials or listened to her. I'm on the verge of leaving Evangelicalism unless there's a Reformation of Evangelicalism around the corner.
    5 points
  49. We changed churches in the middle of the last president’s term because we didn’t fit that church politically and it was coloring everything. We felt just as Moore said above, that they were not in step with biblical doctrine. And they feel the same way about us. The leadership in the church where we are now has been very careful not to let anyone know where they stand politically.
    5 points
  50. They actually initiated that trial back in November and said that the 1 and 2 dose trials would "run in parallel." I suspect they already know that 2 doses is more effective, but also know that a "1 shot" vaccine is a big selling point. I will not be surprised if the data from the 2-dose trial gets released this summer, after all the first doses have been distributed, and then they'll announce that everyone who got the "1 dose" vaccine should come back for a 2nd shot. I just wish they'd release their data on mild illnesses, like every other manufacturer, so we'd know what the real efficacy is.
    5 points
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