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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/03/2021 in all areas

  1. censored, banned, burned by governments or mobs... ...vs discontinued by the author / author's estate Evidently the Seuss estate *did* want to "make a huge public statement over it." The statement they evidently wanted to make was something like Which is a wonderful and evergreen and valuable lesson. Seuss continues to teach us. [from a forever fan, despite the uneveness]
    32 points
  2. I do love Dr Seuss, but when you know better, you do better. Times have changed and it is appropriate to retire offensive stereotypes.
    27 points
  3. This story is a perfect illustration of the "outrage culture" fomented by talk radio and social media. So a minor story noting that the company founded by Seuss's family will no longer reprint a few books that most people have never heard of, gets blown up into "they're banning Dr Seuss!" And now people are paying inflated prices to buy up soon-to-be-OOP books that they've likely never read, and have no real interest in reading, because they saw a tweet or a FB post telling them that their right to read a book with racist stereotypes is being taken away from them!!! and they should be totally outraged about that!!! Apparently some people think that allowing the company that owns the rights to a book to decide not to continue publishing it is actually more offensive than depicting Black people as monkeys.
    21 points
  4. I'm one of those crazy women that quit her sensible job, moved across the country for a "lesser job", and left her husband for some guy I met on the internet. To outsiders, it looked like I'd lost my mind. My family told me I was ruining my life. The judgement was harsh. The part that outsiders didn't know was that a) I hated my job and had never planned to make it a lifetime career. It was the thing I would do until I figured out what I wanted to do next b) I hated where I lived, and was only there because of the job that I hated, and c) my (ex) husband was a drug addict and an alcoholic, who was never, ever going to change. The only person that knew all of A, B, and C was my therapist. I don't know how most people would handle this sort of situation, but I didn't tell anyone how much of a mess my life was. It feels humiliating when your life is in that much disarray. It's not something I wanted everyone to know about, so I'm sure it seemed like all of my changes were "crazy" and coming out of left field. From my perspective, life was already in ruin. I had absolutely nothing to lose by walking away. My only regret is not leaving sooner, but then I might not have met my husband when I did, aka "some guy on the internet". We've been together over 14 years now and have a child together.
    18 points
  5. No one has cheered censorship. Dr Seuss's estate has determined that some of his books contain offensive racial stereotypes--which is undeniable--and they are declining to reissue those works. That's not censorship. Bill
    17 points
  6. They aren't being banned or burned.
    17 points
  7. This narrative that kids don't care, or that parents don't care, or that they aren't "motivated" is one of the most damaging racist narratives out there. Here's how I see it. I like money. I would like to have a lot more money than I currently have, and I think that if I did, I could do lots of things that would benefit my kids. Since I also like my kids, I would really like more money. Every few years, there is a job that comes available in my city that pays a lot more than my current job as a special educator. The person who currently has that job makes about 225 times as much money as I do. No, that wasn't a typo. He makes two hundred twenty five times as much as I do. Rumor has it, that he might not have his job next year, so you'd think I'd apply for it. I mean after all I CLAIM that I'm interested in money, and I'm motivated for money. But here's the thing. I don't have a clue how to do the job. It's not just that I don't know the rules, or how to do the things that are required, I don't even know the things I would need to do to get the point where I could do that job. I wouldn't know how to start. For example, this job involves throwing a football, and if you put one in my hand and told me to go out and practice, I can guarantee I'd throw it so badly that I'd just be practicing the wrong things. If, somehow, the staff our local football team lost their minds and gave me the job anyway, I can tell you exactly what I'd do. I wouldn't practice, because I wouldn't know how. Instead, I'd be spending my time faking injuries, and begging the coach to put in the back up quarterback. If those things failed, and they put me out there, I'd throw the ball in the wrong direction before the defensive linesmen could sack me, and curl up in a ball on the field. Because even though I really do like money, and I really am motivated by money, I'm also motivated to avoid being hurt, and while I don't know how to play football, I do have some pretty good ideas about how to do the latter. In my experience with parents living in multigenerational poverty in distressed communities, they do want something different for their kids. They want the same exact things for their kids that I want for mine. A job that lets them choose where to live, and that leaves them feeling proud and not beaten down at the end of the day, and enough money to be able to buy that house in a safe neighborhood, and to work hours that let them come home at a decent hour and to put good food on the table. They want their kids to go to college, and to have the academic skills to be what they want to be, and to able to understand how to help their own kids with homework. But they don't have a clue how to get there. They can't just buy a new house in a new neighborhood. They can't do what their parents did, because what their parents did didn't work. They can't work the system using the strategies that worked for them in school, because they attended, but didn't successfully graduate from, broken schools that didn't teach any strategies. They can't partner with the school, if the school isn't interested in partnering with them back. They can't do things like "make sure their kid goes to school", if the school isn't letting them know that the kid isn't going. They can't homeschool, or even help with homework because they don't have the skills. And meanwhile, while they're trying to figure this out, the defensive line is breaking through and bearing down hard, not on them, but on their precious beloved sons. Only instead of football players threatening to sack them, it's gang members threatening his life, or police officers threatening to carry him off to jail, or drug dealers trying to get him addicted. And, they're terrified of those things, so they put their head down, and direct all their energy into protecting their child and themselves from hurt, because at least they have some ideas how to do that. And when they choose strategies that prioritize safety, they get judged as not being "motivated" or as not "caring about educatoin ", and add that to the list of reasons why somehow it's their fault that the school is failing their child. For example, a mother might decide that due to issues in her neighborhood, her child is safest inside the house, and since she needs to go to work, or to whatever class they're making her attend to keep her AFDC payments, her kid is home alone watching TV instead of attending the Boys and Girls club, where there's homework help, and also gang members recruiting outside. But when she makes that choice, people judge her for turning down free help and decides she doesn't care about education. She might decide that her child is safer if he meets certain standards of dress. That his hair should look a certain way, and his clothes should be neat and clean and pressed. She knows, from experience, that interactions with the police will go better if her son looks well cared for. She knows, from experience, that he won't be targeted by drug dealers looking to hire someone if he doesn't look poor. But when she sends the kid to school, she's judged as caring more about appearances than about academics. She might decide that her child is safer if he's under the eye of someone she trusts. So, she might let him get a job with someone from her church, or play on a sports team where her neighbor is the coach, even if those things aren't perfectly scheduled. But when he kids comes to school and talks about the game he played in, she gets judged for letting him play when his grades are poor. And each time she's judged for those things, that judgment becomes excuse for teachers to make fewer phone calls, or for high schools to make fewer policies, or for legislatures to fund fewer programs to help her. The reality is that living in the circumstances these parents are in is hard. Many of them are trying the best that they can. Knowing how to help them, as educators, or neighbors, or concerned citizens, is hard too, and we may not do it perfectly or have 100% success. But we need to keep trying, and that trying starts with understanding her experiences, and partnering with her and all the other mothers and fathers like her to help these precious, beloved children.
    16 points
  8. Let's take these headlines with a grain of salt. These aren't Seuss' best work, and other than Mulberry Street they aren't very well known, and I doubt any of them have been big sellers in the past 20+ years. The Seuss estate decided to stop printing six poor sellers, and to get a little PR out of it by saying that it's due to the offensive imagery. It's not like the imagery isn't there, but if they thought that there was more money in it, they would've simply had the books edited slightly and then issued that press release instead.
    16 points
  9. Support systems make a difference. I do feel that I have spent a lot of the last twenty-five years subsuming my wishes to those of others. I don't regret it, but there's no need for it to continue. Because I have a loving husband and children who are excited to hear about my plans, the changes can be modest but are meaningful to me: having my own space in the house that we moved into, going back to university, taking charge of my health, saying 'no' more. If I didn't have support then I might do something more extreme.
    15 points
  10. Great Total Eclipse of the Heart-inspired tee.
    13 points
  11. How would this actually be better? I tend to think that showing where the problem lies is educational, and gives people a chance to reflect and consider how the images could be problematic. But that's my point of view, and I'm interested in yours.
    13 points
  12. Those schools aren’t even good enough to be daycares. Look at the stats for those schools. I’m telling you right now - schools like that do not want parent involvement. There is a heavy and strong prevailing attitude that those parents are too ignorant to know anything and obviously don’t have any care or brains about their lives or they’d have had the sense to not have kids while poor. Those schools are not interested in communicating with parents and they for sure don’t want parental involvement demanding they do their jobs. I get it. Parents just trying to keep the lights on and people fed still need to check school work (that they often do not understand) and ride the teachers to do better. But I also think for many reasons that’s not as simple or realistic as people think. And one supposed aspect of mandatory schooling is exactly because we have known for centuries that this is an unrealistic demand on parents in the lower classes. The main point of the original public schools was exactly because those parents could not assure their children’s expanded education on their own. My parents did not have education past 6th and 8th grade. They presumed that teachers were paid to do their jobs and left it at that. I can only remember 4 times in all of K-12 where my parents had any interaction at all with my schooling. They didn’t even come to my graduation and couldn’t have told you what high school I attended. Partly bc I am a girl (my father would often say the dumbest thing men did was teach women to read and let them vote) but mostly bc they figured it wasn’t their job, that’s why they sent me to school. That’s what they paid taxes for. I’m the only one of the four of their kids who graduated high school. And my parents were not stupid people. They just didn’t think it was their job and they figured they’d done pretty well so it wasn’t a big deal. We can say well the students are just lazy or stupid for not doing better bc teachers can not make them do the work. Teachers can’t make them do the work but they sure as hell can teach and teach in a way that recognizes the needs of their students and makes an effort to engage those students. By the look of that school’s statistics - there is flagrant educational neglect in that school. I deserved a basic education regardless of my parents education level or their interest in me or how hard they were working. That basic premise is literally why we have mandatory schooling in this country. The kids in that school district deserve it too.
    13 points
  13. We could focus on the individual, or we could look at the class ranking given and realize this is not a one-family problem. Something is very clearly wrong in this school, which is obviously in a community that is struggling as a whole if the majority of its kids are going underserved at every turn.
    13 points
  14. Yes, I’ve seen children who looked just like those pictures. In real life. Sometimes in my arms. Two died in car accidents where they either were not buckled and being held on someone’s lap, or the mom was high on drugs and wrecked the car while speeding. One was beaten to death by a parent. One by her mother’s drug dealer. I’ve seen murdered, assaulted, and abused children. Way too many. None were trafficked by strangers in a cult or certain political stripe. I don’t believe any of that is photoshop. It’s too real and too true to what I’ve seen. But it’s easy enough for anyone to find pictures and attach them to a website or YouTube video and claim they’re something they aren’t. Also, the pictures of those kids show a phenomonon called raccoons eyes. It’s definitely not from being sodomized as the captions from the websites state; it’s generally a signs of a basilar skull fracture. So right there, that automatically makes me suspect of the information.
    13 points
  15. Nobody is going to storm into your house, rip the books off your shelves and burn them. No one is going to forbid book sellers from selling them or even libraries (as a general category) from having them on their shelves. Individual school districts, libraries etc will make choices, as they already are doing, as to what to include and promote. It’s absurd to say that the publisher HAS to continue to publish books that they have decided to stop publishing.
    12 points
  16. As others have said, it boils down to who is doing the “banning.” I put that in quotes, because this is not an example of banning. If Dr Seuss Enterprises was printing the books and selling them, and a 3rd party came along and said, “You are no longer allowed to print these books!” then that would be banning/censorship, etc and I would be against that, even if the books were offensive. But when a company says, “We no longer want to make this product,” then...they have every right not to make that product. This is not banning or censorship. This is a company saying, “We don’t agree with this product and we’re not going to keep making it.” That’s capitalism. And it’s also ethics. You get to make and sell whatever you want to make and sell. No one tells you what to make.
    12 points
  17. There are issues with both the writing and illustrations. How many children who grab a book off the library shelf are going to read "a lesson with context at the end of the book"? Why should we keep reprinting books that depict "Africans" like this?
    12 points
  18. But you don't trust the estate of Dr. Seuss to make their own decisions on what they want to print or not print? If I decide at some point that I don't like say, the sex scene in a book I have written, and decide to decline reissuing it because of that, is that censorship? Is it morally problematic? These are books for 5 year olds, and not great works of literature. No one is missing out. And at 5 yrs old, we have other ways to teach object lessons that don't involve having kids look at these images, getting (rightfully) upset. And even if you are a Kindy teacher and think these ARE the best books, fine. Find a used copy.
    11 points
  19. I don't know enough about the situation to comment fully, but I will tell you that I worked in a school (for 11 years) that used to be considered the largest school in the USA. We had over 6,000 students. There were often 40 per classroom, times 5 periods per day and an additional homeroom class. In addition to that, the school was considered a revolving door, we had aprox. 1800 leave the school during the school year and an additional 1800 arriving. The area was very transient due to families moving from other countries and staying with relatives until they could get on their feet, job losses, etc.... We were also the lowest performing school in the area with horrific graduation rates. I am sure those in more stable areas, with parents who were involved in education, thought we were horrible. But we worked our butts off to try to stay afloat. But with over 200 students to keep track of per teacher, counselor case loads of 650, where over 100 were coming and going at any given time and recalculations of credits and grades were taking place, some students fell between the cracks. I gave parent talks just to explain what a credit means, what a GPA is, and what classes were needed to finish high school. I was the counselor for a while in charge of helping first generation college kids get to college and I simply couldn't help all of them. And I often didn't have many parents show up. I don't know what is missing from this op ed piece but I am guessing it is a lot. This child fell through the cracks and that is a horrible place to fall. The school absolutely didn't do what they needed to do. The mom didn't do what she needed to do. Maybe she didn't even know what it was she needed to do in the first place, maybe the school did reach out multiple times and got no response. Maybe teachers tried to talk to the student and he didn't care. But he should not have gone to the next class if he failed the first one. That is a huge oversight. BUT, We just don't know the whole story. It looks like he is now getting what he needs and hopefully he can propel forward from here on out.
    11 points
  20. I must be in the minority because the older I get the more I understand and it's often people in generations that came later who are teaching me. I'm a product of my time and always thought of myself as not racist but know now that I was, without realizing it. I've learned so much, especially in the past year, from my son's Gen Z as well as from Millennials how wrong I was. I've learned from people of color how wrong I was. If we think we don't understand then it's up to us to listen and learn. As long as we have our faculties we're never too old to learn. First of all, no one is cheering censorship because this isn't censorship. It isn't book banning. It's capitalism with the added sensitivity towards the people being depicted in the illustrations. It seems like the Seuss family truly does feel, like many of us, that these caricatures are problematic but they still made a decision to stop publishing/licensing books that were actually poor sellers. Do they have that right? Should they only choose to stop publishing books that aren't controversial? Is there a name for forced publishing? Forced licensing? Are you in favor of forcing every author and every publisher to continue publishing books they don't want published? I read banned books all through the year and therefore feel no need to read them during the official banned books week but these books aren't in that category. These books aren't being banned even if some schools choose not to keep them on the shelves. Copies already in print can still be sold and resold. Libraries can still choose to keep them on their shelves. The family has asked but not insisted that they be removed. There will be no more new copies of these books released but there are plenty still out there that will remain available. This was already quoted by someone else but it deserves to be shown again. It says everything.
    10 points
  21. Yes, I wish people wouldn't use the word "ban" when discussing books that are removed from the curriculum or even the library. No school district has the power to actually "ban" a book anyway. What would that mean? That if a child reads the book, he/she is expelled from school? The word "ban" is used intentionally to stir things up. I read once how the guy who used to run Fox News (I can't remember his name right now - he died a few years ago) said that their formula included amplifying crazy, obscure things that happened on college campuses. This is the same thing. It seems like every few months, there's some article targeting things like this and #DisruptTexts. The articles almost always mischaracterize what is happening. Then there's a furor on Twitter and my homeschooling FB groups, e.g. "I can't believe they're banning Shakespeare now!" Would you think this was "absolutely ridiculous" if the offensive pictures were of people like you? This reminds me of a discussion on a homeschooling FB group. It started with one of the articles I describe above ("They're banning Shakespeare!"). Then a few days later, someone asked for a book recommendation about children who belong to their religious group. Everyone agreed that it was great to find books about children who are like their own children. Talk about cognitive dissonance.
    10 points
  22. In contrast, I stopped engaging in school my senior year. I went into the building, but I really didn't do much of anything, or hand much of anything in. Some of it was that my Dad had been diagnosed with cancer, but some of it was that I knew I had college acceptances in hand. My counselor called my parents. When he learned that they were traveling for my Dad's cancer treatment, he lept into action. He had me in his office multiple times a week to check in and it was always clear that he had talked to my teachers. He arranged for me to be able to take naps in the nurse's office and still be marked present. He asked for extensions and exceptions for me, and offered to find me tutors. The difference was almost certainly the color of our skin. Except that urban schools that serve predominantly low income kids of color have a history of lack of transparency or logic about how people are moving towards graduation. I tutored a student once who was in kinship foster care. He started first grade in a new family and a new school. His foster mom, who planned to adopt him, went to every meeting the school asked for, where she was consistently told that he was near the top of the class. She did every homework assignment with him, and made sure they were turned in. His spelling tests and other assessments came back with A's. On the last day of school, he came home with a report card that made the recommendation that he repeat first grade. When Mom called the school, she was told that even though he was one of the top students in his class, his school had sorted out the rising first graders and put the kids they "knew" would need two years into one section, so while he had done all the work and learned everything they taught, since the section hadn't taught everything, he didn't know what he needed for second grade. I had another student who came to me with some confusion about whether he was a third or fourth grader. Hi mom said he had been in third grade the previous year, but his report card said he had been in second grade. Eventually we figured out that the school had retained him, and maybe told the mom verbally at pick up one day, in English without a translator, when she only spoke Spanish. I had another student who got their first special education evaluation as an 8th grader, after family connected with a lawyer. At that point, the kid had been passed from Headstart to Middle School, in the same neighborhood, without learning to recognize the letters of her own name. So, it's easy for me to believe that this family received very few messages about how their son was doing, and that the messages they did receive were confusing. If one of the messages they received was that he was scheduled to attend English III, or Algebra 2, it's easy to see how they might interpret that to mean that English II and Algebra 1 had been finished. This is the underlying problem.
    10 points
  23. I don't know what to think. Top part of the article says only one teacher in the last 3 years contacted her. Article doesn't say if she talked to that teacher though. But then it says a home visit was done due to chronic truancy? So which is it? Did they not say at the home visit he wasn't going to graduate or did they just say, "Send him to school"? I'm confused. Mom dropped the ball, but the school dropped the ball too. Kid failed Spanish, Algebra, and English, but he was then scheduled for the next level. Um, almost half of the class has a GPA BELOW .13?!? That school needs to be shut down; it's not educating.
    10 points
  24. I’m completely against this idea. There are teens saving for a car or college, or even contributing to the household income. There are housewives or seniors who want to work part time, maybe even just to get out and feel useful. Or maybe they’re looking to supplement Social Security or whatever. It’s wrong to pay them less just because they don’t ‘need it’ to live. If that’s the benchmark, why pay anyone a high salary? they don’t ‘need’ that much.
    10 points
  25. Cloistered nuns perhaps? Newborns? People who have been in comas since 1982? Otherwise, I'm with you. Those are the categories I can come up with.
    9 points
  26. I think, though I am not certain about this, that the issue is that Dr. Seuss's estate itself has decided to stop publishing it. Which seems like the right thing to do, to me? I mean, we own several of these books, and they are really problematic. I don't think this necessarily means that Dr. Seuss was the devil or anything; he was, like all of us, a product of his time. I'm sure there will be second hand copies of And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street around for a long time to come.
    9 points
  27. Quoted from the same blog post I linked to above: Critical Analysis of Race in 50 Children’s Books by Dr. Seuss Of the 2240 human characters, there are 45 characters of color, representing 2% of the total number of human characters. Of the 45 characters of color, all 45 (100%) are depicted in a racist manner. Every single character of color is portrayed through at least 3, and sometimes all 5, of the following themes: Subservience: “Useful in an inferior capacity: subordinate: submissive” Dehumanization: “To deprive of human qualities, personality, spirit / to treat someone as though he or she is not human” Exotification: “portrayed as originating in or characteristic of a distant foreign country / very different / “other”” Stereotypes: “a standardized mental picture that represents an oversimplified opinion, prejudiced attitude, or uncritical judgment / to believe unfairly that all people or things with a particular characteristic are the same” Caricature: “exaggeration by means of often ludicrous distortion of parts or characteristics” Of the 2 “African” characters: Both are depicted as monkeys (in the same likeness that Seuss depicted Africans and African Americans in his racist political cartoons). Both are depicted in a subservient role, carrying an animal to a white male child’s zoo. Of the 14 “Asian” characters: Eleven of the 14 “Asian” characters are wearing stereotypical, conical “rice paddy hats”. The three (and only) “Asian” characters who are not seen wearing “rice paddy hats”, are carrying an animal in a large cage on top of their heads. There is a white male child holding a gun, standing on top of the animal cage that is being balanced on top of their heads. Twelve of the 14 “Asian” characters are featured in subservient roles, hunting down or carrying exotic animals for a white male child. They are described by Dr. Seuss in the text as “helpers that all wear their eyes at a slant” from “countries no one can spell”. Of the 29 characters wearing turbans: Fifteen are riding exotic animals, including camels, elephants and zebras, and four are playing exotic instruments. Seventeen of the “turban-wearing” characters are in a subservient role, “fetching” something for the white male child; driving a cart full of white males; or, carrying something for a white male child. One of the “turban-wearing” characters is referenced as being suitable to bring back, along with the exotic animals, to be on display in the white male child’s zoo. In the book, If I Ran the Zoo, Seuss’s text reads “A Mulligatawny is fine for my zoo And so is a chieftain (referring to the turban-wearing man), I’ll bring one back too”. There is a notable history of white people putting people of color on display in zoos (see David, 2013).
    9 points
  28. Just to add that in Australia, a teenager gets paid less than an adult. It would go up each year until you are 21. So, casual min wage for an 18yr old is 16.80, for a 21 yr old is $24 (keep in mind, Australian $$). This means McDonalds and similar tend to only hire young people. In our state, there's no minimum age to work, either, but I think 14 is the youngest places will hire. You will definitely see 14yr olds taking orders at KFC - I have never seen an elderly person working in a similar position. It is very, very difficult to get a job if you're an older person. However, we do have the great benefit that health care, unemployment benefits and so forth aren't tied to having a job. Which means it's easier to start your own business. Half the local women I know are cleaners with their own business. They all have degrees, let me add, but there just aren't a lot of jobs esp if you need to be free outside school hours. In short, raising the minimum wage is great, but if you sorted your healthcare situation out (not sure what else is tied to employment in the USA), you might find all sorts of benefits to employment that way.
    9 points
  29. It's so interesting that you have friends from another galaxy!
    8 points
  30. Since it's his estate, it's like the author decided to stop publishing them. Doesn't an author have that right?
    8 points
  31. Well, if I had put out something into the world that I later realized did not represent me, or my values, why would I KEEP publishing that thing? I mean, if I have a facebook post I later regret I take it down, same idea. Not wanting to perpetuate and profit off of something they regret makes total sense.
    8 points
  32. Yeah, those parents living there TOTALLY do so by choice and couldn’t care less about education. 😒 Are we REALLY this out of touch with what’s going on in impoverished urban areas?!?! Let’s please stop pretending this is a country of middle class suburbanites with privileged upbringings.
    8 points
  33. It really should have kept pace and been going up all along. It might take a "minute" to adjust but it has to happen and should happen sooner than later. Thinking it's fine for owners to make gabillions off of workers who are making so little they can't make it without assistance has got to stop. (I also think ubi is a good idea)
    8 points
  34. AKA "when you know better, you do better."
    7 points
  35. Or an indication of just how many people are desperate to cling to anything that validates their superiority.
    7 points
  36. 7 points
  37. Yes it is common. In my alternate dimension anyway.
    7 points
  38. Dr. Suess books are generally read to quite-young children. You can have a thoughtful discussion about the depiction of Native Americans in Little House on the Prairie with older elementary students, but I think providing context to littles about a Dr. Suess book is a tough go. It takes a gifted teacher with a small number of students, I think, and you know what? By the time you get to the lesson at the end of the book, minority students have already endured listening to their teachers read about, and their peers laugh uproariously at, the idea of putting an African chief in a zoo. Even if a teacher is completely sincere in presenting the lesson, I think it would have a nudge-nudge-wink-wink aura about it: read a book that presents this as funny, pausing for laughter, and then say, okay, that wasn't actually funny . . . I think this is 100% incorrect. The white children are depicted in the book in straightforward cartoon style, with no ludicrous distortion. I don't think we're supposed to copy/paste images, but each link has an example: White boy: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/new-priceless-dr-seuss-childrens-book-found-in-late-authors-home-260712 White children shown in header graphic and numbers 7 & 9: https://slurrpfarm.com/blogs/blog/10-story-books-for-kids-by-dr-seuss These absolutely cannot be compared to the depictions of other races in the books.
    7 points
  39. I love this, because this is really the way it should be, isn't it? In a healthy marriage, each partner will or should recognize that each will change over time. The life built together will change as children grow, as we grow. Of course change is hard when one is ahead of the other or moving in a different way. Look at how much we (I include myself) here complain about being in charge of cooking/shopping/meal planning. In my life at least, and I think in others' as well, that made sense at one time. Now I am ready to change that, but I have to give everyone else time to adjust. And of course we are working together and adjustments are being made. My husband and I are in a delicate dance right now due to family circumstances. I am not content with my life right now, but we are slowly changing our ways. I'm making subtle changes in various areas of my/our life. Of course my husband is changing too. There are things we can't change of course. I think it's great for older kids to see their parents change and adjust together. They need to see that a long-term marriage can work even as people grow and change. (Note I am talking about healthy relationships, not situations with abuse, addition, infidelity etc.)
    7 points
  40. Fixed it for ya!
    7 points
  41. I am hoping that it's a seller's market when we sell our house and a buyer's market when we buy! 😁 Considering that we are also hoping to do those two things as simultaneously/seamlessly as possible... it's a Big Ask, but Imma asking anyway! 🙃
    7 points
  42. DD just flew back to Austria (from Texas) where she is in grad school. She had to have a negative test (not a rapid test) with the sample collected no more than 72 hours before boarding her flight. She was concerned about turn-around times in testing so she had two tests at two different locations, hoping that she would get the results back in time--she did and both came back negative. Then, she also had to have a negative rapid test when boarding the flight. She arrived in Austria on Sunday. She has to quarantine at her apartment. She said that the police showed up at her apartment today to see if she was there.
    7 points
  43. My dad managed a small-town grocery store for many, many years. The profit margins are very tight--1 to 2%. The owner of the store is generous to a fault. He keeps on employees who frankly *should* be fired because he says, "What would they do if I let them go?" He hired at least one shoplifter and at least one ex-con and once people start there they often stay until they are elderly. That said, he is unwilling to hire on many full-time employees because he would have to give them benefits, and he depends largely on high school workers for bagging and stocking. I honestly don't know what would happen to the store if the minimum wage was raised to $15 an hour. I would not be surprised if it would have to close. Times have changed so much. My dad started working there as a bagger, hired by the current owner's father because my dad was a teen with a wife and son. Within about seven years, my dad was able to buy land and have a house built. I imagine that would be *really* hard for a low-level employee to do today, especially with only one parent working full-time. Something has to change. People should be able to buy food, pay for housing, take care of medical expenses, and save some too with a full-time blue-collar job. There's something wrong and almost indecent that they can't do that now. I don't know what the answer is.
    7 points
  44. One problem that I see with increasing the federal minimum wage is that it does not take into account the differences in the cost of living in different areas. My DD makes $11.00 at her job as an “essential worker”. She has worked a ton of overtime in the last year.when her w-2 arrived a few weeks ago, she shared her amount of total income for last year. While it isnt a lot by anyone’s standards, I compared her income to the income requirements to qualify for government assistance, and for a single person she made $10,000 above the income limit. She is making a decent living at her entry level, no education required job. While she would sure like to get paid more, where should the limits be drawn? Does the government need to guarantee her enough income to be able to take a big vacation each year? She has a car (paid for) and her own apartment. I think we still pay her auto insurance because we have a family plan and taking her off doesn’t save us much. She has started a retirement account, and pays her own medical bills. She is about to age out of our medical insurance and qualifies for subsidized insurance through our state’s marketplace. While she does not have an extravagant lifestyle at all, it is fine for the choices she had made. I don’t think that the benefit of increasing her wages to $15 hr is worth the cost increases to the consumer or business owner. By our state’s standards, she would have to be a family of 4 to get any government assistance at her income. That being said, I don’t think that $11 hr wage, or even $15 per hour, is a livable wage in places like California or New York City. I think that individual states need to have a state minimum wage that accounts for the cost of living in that state. So maybe I could support a Federal minimum wage of like $10 which states should increase as needed.
    7 points
  45. I think it definitely needs to be raised. Whether that's to $15/hr or some other amount -- IDK. I'd also really like to see some sort of schedule/methodology for future automatic raises included in any legislation that's passed. I'm thinking something like the formula that's used to determine Social Security increases.
    7 points
  46. If a business can only make a profit if workers are not paid enough to live on, then it isn't a profitable business.
    7 points
  47. Ok...so what does that have to do with this? No one is keeping anyone from reading older copies. The author's estate is just not going to publish it anymore. Same as if I decided I didn't want one of my own books to go into reprint due to a change in mindset over something in one of them. Right. And of course, no one is banning them or erasing them. Heck, I have mutiple copies I think. But the author (and by extension, their estate) should have the right to say, "man, i don't want my/our name on that anymore - that's not what I belive in anymore and I don't want to keep putting it out there, it is am embarrassment now." My best analogy is say a romance writer who writes explicit sex scenes between unmarried people later becomes a conservative Christian and decides they no longer want to publish books with explicit sex scenes between unmarried characters. Some of her books are out of print and she can decide if she wants to reprint or not and decides not to, as they no longer represent her moral values. She should have the right to do so without others thinking she's book banning. Or, say you own a cafe. You serve many things, including a signature, named dish that is a fancy bacon cheeseburger. You become Kosher. You stop serving bacon cheeseburgers. That does not mean you are banning bacon, nor cheeseburgers. It doesn't mean you are erasing them. It means you will no longer make that signature dish as you don't want your name associate with it anymore.
    6 points
  48. Yes, I know this song. Although, to be fair, it might be because I worked data entry one summer during college and they played the radio in the office. The radio station was "the greatest hits of the 70s, 80s, and 90s". I called it, "We play the same 100 songs every day, just in a different order."
    6 points
  49. I do not know how anyone on this planet could not know that song! (JK but it's really common knowledge IMO!)
    6 points
  50. PS. Having said all that, I have a friend who is probably around 75 now whose minimum wage job in NYC was enough back in the day to support a wife and baby son and pay for college, which he was attending simultaneously. We need to remember that the minimum wage was not originally intended for just stopgap introductory jobs. It was designed to be a modest but functional household living wage.
    6 points
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