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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/07/2020 in Posts

  1. I did it! Really pleased. Before and after below. ............ I cracked and ordered a cordless clipper today. Hairdressers should be open here around the end of July, but a) I hate how my hair looks - I'm pretty low maintenance, but I pay attention to my hair and glasses - and b) I don't know if I want to go into the hairdresser even then, as it will be about the time that I can start visiting my 95yo mother. FWIW, I've offered to pay my hairdresser anyway to support the business. Anyway, I normally have short hair and have had it shorter in the past. I've found some good videos and I think I can do it. Any experience? I am used to doing the dog, and have done Husband's (very short) hair too. I'm thinking of number 8 on top and a bit shorter on the sides and back. I don't want to ask Husband to do it - he'd be too scared I think, and that's fine.
    12 points
  2. re I share your goals, but your tactics are "not constructive" Aaaaand, nearly 60 years later . . . 57 years later was Kaepernick. It literally is not possible to NAME a more non-violent tactic than silently taking a knee. Yet that form of protest provoked widespread fury and outrage That tactic was deemed provocative, insulting, not constructive. Not by a few, by many, including many on this board; as well as from the sitting POTUS and the sitting Vice POTUS. A march that disrupts traffic: not constructive. (I recall a Mondo Thread on that subject on this board.) A spotlight that projects annoying words onto private buildings: not constructive. Athlete using his national platform to raise national awareness: not constructive, shut up and dribble. Beyonce's Formation at Super Bowl, not constructive. Van Jones last week: not constructive. Wholly and entirely non-violent, all. Yet, strangely, every last one deemed not constructive. It's almost like the only "acceptable" protest is one that is not seen, not heard, not disruptive or inconvenient in any way... to white people. Keep it Over There, but do not intrude on my space, my roadway, my airwaves, my game. Almost like the criteria for "acceptable" is: it does not enter our cozy white world. Which makes perfect sense, as the literal point is to disrupt that cozy white world. There never has been a form of protest that in its time was deemed "constructive" by those in power. Certainly not MLK, or Gandhi, or Mandela. Ex post, after the fact, in comparison with others? Sometimes. But in its time? No. And there never will be.
    11 points
  3. The girls are doing well. One doctor said Freya doesn’t seem to know that she was born early and is small. Eliza is struggling to fully inflate her lungs but wait and see seems to be the usual NICU mode, which I totally understand. Yesterday they were one week old so my baby got to hold her baby for the first time. pictures 1 & 2 are Freya’s feet doing baby ballet and pictures 3 & 4 are Eliza holding her own binky and giving the stink eye if you are coming to change her tiny diaper. I am still waiting to meet them. Amber in SJ
    8 points
  4. Knock out production! We all enjoyed this much more than we expected -- Shakespeare's problematic character of Coriolanus, in a National Theater production, free live streamlining through June 11: National Theater: Coriolanus
    8 points
  5. We’re finally in the actual home study process, starting about 14 weeks after being asked to take placement. It is interstate, but still. In all that time, I asked over and over for things we could do to prepare and make sure the process wouldn’t get held up on our end, but no one official would tell us anything. So now here we are, rapidly trying to finish a list of a million things that EASILY could have been handled weeks ago! More recent child abuse and criminal checks than our existing ones ? Coulda done it. Diagram of our house and fire plan? Coulda done it. Doctor forms? Coulda done it.Autobiography? Copies of a thousand documents? I could go on. None of these things are especially difficult, but they are time consuming, and we had lots of time on our hands .None involve sharing Confidential information except on our end and not until we submit them. We literally could have had every single thing ready except for classes and the FBI fingerprints (or we could have even done that if given the special code.) Instead, I’m shuffling papers and scheduling appointments like a madwoman and scared I’ll miss something in my rush. There is no “worthy” reason I can imagine that this couldn’t have been started sooner. All we needed was the checklist we finally got. 😖
    6 points
  6. Here's an example @Momto6inIN. I am a bi-racial (Black and Korean) woman who converted and (was it feels like now) a part of an Orthodox Jewish community. I have to deal with racism on several fronts (Black and Asian/Korean), sexism (being a woman), and anti-Semitism due to being Jewish. Sometimes those come at me one at a time, but often times they come as several ganged up together. Or they come at me from different parts of my life. For example right now I am feeling othered by my Orthodox Jewish community (and even some friends, sadly) because of racist comments from them about the BLM movement (they are seen as being anti-Semitic) and Black folk in general due to the protesting/rioting. It's basically a case of Whack-A-Mole gone really unpleasant. Hope that helps.
    6 points
  7. I thought my grandson's online schooling experience fits well with this meme. His body language screams...."Do I have to do this?."
    6 points
  8. Dh and ds14 took a load of junk to the landfill today, mostly stuff that has been cluttering up the back yard. It's nice to have it gone. I keep intending to plan for next year's homeschool but the fact that dd16 isn't finished with this year is seriously dragging down my motivation. I've called it a year for the others except that they are still supposed to do math through the summer. I don't actually have to plan for dd16 for next year since she will be doing all online college courses so that isn't really a good excuse but my brain just doesn't want to switch gears. And I do need to get her through the rest of her stuff for this year, it's the high school and needing to grant credit thing.
    6 points
  9. Yeah.....I don't think the US actually WANTS to have accurate information, nor does it particularly care about getting the pandemic under control.
    5 points
  10. Also, given how widespread covid-19 is in the US at this point, I'm not sure singling out people traveling from overseas is of much benefit anymore.
    5 points
  11. As white middle class, middled-aged women we're not accustomed to having our voices heard. Society may routinely ignore our voices but there is one thing we have that they do respect, control over our families' spending. One thing we can easily do is stop financially supporting reactionary media. If you are a white middle class, middled-aged woman Christian woman (I fall into this category myself) then many of commentators you've watched on TV, clicked "live" on their FB posts, bought their books, etc. have really bad takes on this issue. Don't give them clicks. Don't buy their books, listen to their podcasts, etc. Vote with your pocketbook when possible. For far too long, we've tolerated racist voices in our world because we don't want to rock the boat. Here's an example of enough is enough. A Catholic high school in Fresno just fired a theology teacher who has had a very offensive online presence for a long time. He was fired last week because a group of parents signed a petition calling for him to be fired in response to his tweets (under his own name) about the protests. I realize that this is problematic. However, if I was paying tuition to this school I would feel I had every right to object to his public comments. Diocese of Fresno speaks out on Garces teacher's social media posts Sharing this video because I just watched it and was moved by it. She shares some very disturbing clips of police brutality from the recent protests. Young people of all races are participating in the protests and being attacked by the police. They're beating the crap out our kids now. Her message here is very good. They know that people like us (white middle class, middled-aged women) are starting to feel sympathy for the protestors and hostility towards the police. They are trying to speak to us with the police taking the knee videos. She's right - don't fall for it. Besides voting with our pocketbook, we should be fighting hard against the *othering* going on in our communities. Share the videos of young people protesting and being attacked by the police. White middle class mothers need to know that white middle class college kids and other young people are getting the crap beat out of them too. It's not just *other* people's kids; it's our kids too. I know that this advice is based on a lot of racist assumptions and the unfortunate reality that people like us don't care when minority kids are brutalized by the police. Certain parts of social media are now trying very hard to attack that elderly man from Buffalo who was pushed to the ground by the police. Why is that so important? Because he's an elderly white man who walked up to the police to give them back their helmet and was brutally pushed to the ground and left bleeding. They don't want us to think that could be our fathers or grandfathers too. They have to make him an other so we don't connect him to us. He's obviously white and elderly so it's hard to smear him so they must go in another direction.
    5 points
  12. Some newer voices. I've read most of these; the rest are on my to-read list. I'm sure I've missed some, but it's a start! Non-fiction: Ta Nehisi-Coates - We Were Eight Years in Power; The Beautiful Struggle; Between the World and Me Ibram X. Kendi, How to Be an Anti-Racist; Stamped from the Beginning Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy Isabel Wilkerson, The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic Story of America's Great Migration; Caste: the Origins of our Discontent Austin Channing Brown, I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness Sarah Broom, The Yellow House Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow Melba Patilla Beals, Warriors Don't Cry Carol Anderson: White Rage, the Unspoken Truth about Our Racial Divide; One Person, No Vote Karine Jean-Pierre, Moving On Reni Eddo-Lodge: Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race Darnell Moore, No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America Brittney Cooper, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower Patrisse Khan-Cullors: When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir Not quite as contemporary, but timeless: James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time and lots of other things Malcolm X: Autobiography Anne Moody: Coming of Age in Mississippi About South Africa: Trevor Noah, Born a Crime Nelson Mandela, Autobiography Fiction (not all of these are American) Tayari Jones Jesmyn Ward Bernadine Evaristo Kei Miller Lauren Wilkinson Cadwell Turnbull Jacqueline Woodson Namwali Serpell N.K. Jemisin Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Nafissa Thompson-Spires Yaa Gyasi Iweala Uzodinma Margo Jefferson Maisy Card Brit Bennett Imbolo Mbue Ayobami Adebayo Nnedi Okorafor Esi Edugyan Not quite as contemporary, but timeless: Toni Morrison Maya Angelou Zora Neale Hurston Alice Walker James Baldwin belongs here too...
    5 points
  13. I think that's a good # for some days but not all days. But he makes so many other assumptions that could be high (# of infected in the crowd) or low (# of other people infected by each sick person there). Plus, masks, outdoors (both theoretically lowering transmission), chanting, close contact, coughing from tear gas/pepper spray (raising risk of transmission) all figure in & are dependent on location. Lots not masking in some areas but almost everyone masking in others. I continue to hope that the sun/air outdoors lowers the transmission.
    5 points
  14. I went onto the porch to water my tomatoes, and there was this whole skunk family wombling through the yard. They went through a hole in the fence. They were so cute and fluffy and the one in the back was all white. I couldn’t tell if it was albino or not but I had seen it before but so dark I couldn’t tell what species it was. The size from being a kid threw me off too. So precious! I’d leave them some cat food or something, but I worry about Obama getting sprayed. Otherwise I would kinda encourage them to stick around.
    5 points
  15. Good Morning! Happy Sunday! Some elephants thundering down the stairs woke me up. Church/iglesia online -- in 3 hours. I'm not usually up this early.
    5 points
  16. But an army of crows that recognize me and maybe could train to say, “Doom?” Wouldn’t that be cool? And could do corvid intelligence tests on?
    5 points
  17. I designed my own science curriculum for my to be 3rd grader after a lot of encouragement from @Lori D. and @lewelma several months ago. I started off thinking about what I wanted her to learn about and then came up with an order of topics that made sense to me. Then I looked around for books (regular books and textbooks) to use as spines for the different units. Some of the books I chose already had experiments that went with the topics. For the ones that didn't, I scoured experiment books for relevant ones to use. I also have an internet linked encyclopedia that has short video clips we can watch with several of the lessons too. I'm excited to start this curriculum next year!
    5 points
  18. For those who have Amazon prime, I highly recommend streaming “Just Mercy” and “Selma”. Both are streaming free right now.
    5 points
  19. I've started a thread here on the General Board for those who don't want to move to Facebook
    5 points
  20. So right now, I don't have any questions to ask the group, but I can describe how I have created a writing program for my younger who is in 11th grade this year. He is 2E with dysgraphia, so a standard English curriculum has always been impossible to implement. When designing my own curriculum, I've considered 2 main things: 1) what do I want him to learn? and 2) how can I keep him motivated and interested. What do I want him to learn? Well, obviously to write. But I want to tailor it to both let his strengths run, and to shore up his weaknesses. Plus, I want to align his writing to his goals in life. He wants to major in human geography and work to solve complex world problems. So I think he needs to be able to write synthesis papers of many different opinions on the same topic. I also want him to learn how to write for multiple audiences and adjust his approach and style depending on his purpose and audience. I want him to be able to be an effective speaker as he is considering being a Mayor. His strengths: He is a nuanced, deep thinker. He understands multiple perspectives and makes great insights. He has a wonderful style with a lovely use of language features and vocabulary. He can type at speed. His weaknesses: He has dysgraphia. He cannot physically write and we have chosen not to fight that battle. He struggles with structuring his arguments and he is SLOW! What my top goals are for the next 1.5 years. 1) He has to pick up speed 2) He has to be able to structure his arguments What my objectives are (linked to the above 2 goals): 1) I have found a bunch of geography exams where you are given 8 to 10 articles to synthesize on the fly. We will be working through those for a year, to get him faster and faster. I will also be using English unfamiliar text exams for the same purpose. But instead of synthesis, they will be used for analysis. 2) I think that to structure arguments, he needs to have a bunch of purposes and different types of papers to work through. So we have decided on a synthesis research paper, an analytical research paper, a National Geographic article, a creative writing short story, a speech, and a movie analysis. These will be long and have to be carefully structured. How to keep him motivated and keen to learn. The key here is that he gets to pick the topics that fill in for each paper type on #2, and he is on board for the speed work where we used other people's choices for #1. I also work *with* him for a couple hours a day, kicking ideas around, talking to him about structure, answering questions, researching ideas etc. I have lots to say on motivation as this has been a key piece in working with my ds in writing given that he has dysgraphia. But I'm going to post to get this thread started! Looking forward to what others have done and to sharing ideas!
    5 points
  21. Happy Sunday, dear hearts. Our next two 52 Books Bingo categories are Steampunk and technology. Within the world of science fiction, alternative histories, and dystopian worlds, we not only have steampunk, but also cyberpunk, nanopunk, dieselpunk, and biopunk. Whereas steampunk is set in 19th century Victorian times, cyberpunk is set in a futuristic, high tech world. Nanopunk is closely related to cyberpunk but focuses on nanotechnology, dieselpunk embraces diesel technology, and biopunk focuses on the dark side of genetic engineering. 9 novels that defined steampunk The best steampunk books Steampunk 101: From Sci-Fi Sub-genre to Cultural Phenomenon Essential cyberpunk reading list io9 Talks to Kathleen Ann Goonan About Nanopunk and Jazz Delve into the world of fictional or non fiction technology with 7 Books About the Interplay of Technology and Humanity, 10 books with a tech twist: Summer reads for leaders, and 20 Must-Read Dystopian Novels That Are Set In A Futuristic World. Have fun following rabbit trails of thought while exploring steampunk and technology. Link to week 22 Visit 52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as share your book reviews with other readers around the globe.
    4 points
  22. For some reason I find high school easier to DIY than elementary. Maybe because there are fewer high quality resources available to wade theough at that level so it's not so overwhelming to choose? Anyway, I've done world cultures and religion, journalism, and comparative government, and this next year am adding child development. I use as a guideline about an hour's worth of work per day per subject in my mind as a guideline. As I skim through the spine(s) I think about how long it will take to read each chapter. I find my kids can only really digest 15ish pages per day of textbook reading or a half hour of Great Courses lectures/notetaking without information overload happening. I usually plan for a day of discussion per chapter. If it's a GC lecture then I try to watch them with them and discuss afterwards. Then I think about what output I want to see to demonstrate their learning and this is where my guesstimates about how long things will take usually get off track 😉 Sometimes an assignment takes wildly longer than I planned and I have to readjust what content we cover from then on out because it's very important to me (and my kids lol) to not have school take over our lives but to leave them time to pursue their interests. I don't like cutting content but as long as it's not math or science then I don't worry too much and just adjust my course descriptions to reflect the reality of what we studied. Less often I give too much time for an assignment and then it's just bonus free time for them. I don't sweat this either because I know we've already covered the content I wanted to.
    4 points
  23. I lied about the salad. I"m having a chicken quesadilla. I just cleaned my kitchen more than it's been cleaned in probably 10 years. Scrubbed everything. Pulled out everything. Empty out everything. Now I'm very very sore.
    4 points
  24. Yeah, definitely feeling better. Woke up feeling pretty darn good but a couple hours later started running a little low grade temp again and just kinda ran out of energy. But I don’t really feel terrible anymore. Just blah and tired. I’ll live though.
    4 points
  25. I was just talking to my daughter about diapers yesterday. She says she doesn't have time for cloth, so I reminded her to get plain disposables with nothing extra added. Both she and Gymnast broke out in rashes with aloe vera, fragrance, vitamin E, you-name-it. She remembered to get plain wipes. 🙂 I guess I should get granddaughter stuff.
    4 points
  26. I started cutting ds19's hair several years ago. I charged, though (sort of). Haircuts were something that we paid for, so I took the money that was budgeted for his haircuts and moved it into my book fund. :) So every time I cut his hair, I got to buy myself another book. It was a win/win for us both.
    4 points
  27. I read Home Work: A Memoir of my Hollywood Years - 4 Stars - I’ve always loved Julie Andrews and read her first memoir earlier this year. This one was equally delightful. She shares stories of her family and her career starting from the time that she was in “Mary Poppins” and ending in the 1980’s. “The Sound of Music” will always be one of my favorite movies of all time. The first time that I saw it was when I must have been about five or so when we were in Iran. It was dubbed, even Julie Andrews’s singing voice was dubbed. Later while growing up in Wales, they would show it on TV almost every Christmas or Easter. I enjoyed learning more about Julie’s family life, as well as all the struggles with step-parenting and her marriage. Gosh, her marital struggles and her husband’s mood swings were frustrating. Both of her memoirs are among the most open and genuine that I have come across. At times, the writing is a bit dry and repetitive in this one, but I enjoyed it regardless. Those were the times where it seemed that all she was doing was flying back and forth from LA to England to Switzerland, and those parts were tiring to read. I have heard that the audio versions of her memoirs are superb, since they’re narrated by Julie Andrews herself. I’m not an audio type, so that’s that. I would only recommend this book to Julie Andrews fans. I think that’s obvious anyway. Why bother reading a memoir on someone if the person doesn’t interest you? Here are some of my favorite quotes; Here she talks about Walt Disney: “Walt’s persona was that of a kindly uncle—twinkly-eyed, chivalrous, and genuinely proud of all he had created. His international empire encompassed film, television, and even a theme park, yet he was modest and gracious. Our new friend Tom Jones once said to me that you didn’t last very long at the company if you were mean-spirited or bad-tempered.” I remember her talking about the following many years ago on a talk show. This was in Switzerland: “Each day, I walked a full circle, up the hill from our chalet, across the fields behind it, down along the brook, and back to the chalet. It was a good stretch, and my legs grew stronger while I vocalized along the way. One day, I was practicing ‘The Sound of Music,’ which I would be performing in my act. I was rounding the last curve, singing flat out, when suddenly a group of Japanese tourists, cameras around their necks, crested the hill in front of me. They recognized me, and looked simply stunned. I dashed for home, mortified.” “These days, I’ve come to realize that home is a feeling as much as it is a place; it is as much about loving what I do as being where I am.” “The common denominator is human misery. The most important thing I have learned is the simplest of all: people are just people—no matter their politics, their skin color, or where they live. There is no difference in our humanity; only in our circumstances.” These are her father’s words to her after her mother’s passing: “’It is sad, Chick,’ he replied. ‘But that was your mum’s destiny, not yours. Yours is to live out whatever time is given to you to the fullest extent, to relish every day and make it count.’” “When we were touring, my mum would drill into me: ‘Don’t you dare complain about anything . . . not the cigarette smoke in the theater, not having a cold, or waiting long hours. It won’t do a thing for you, and nobody cares. Don’t pull rank, or boast. There’s always someone who can do what you do better than you. Get on with it, and you’ll be respected so much more.’” “Learn your craft. Do your homework. Opportunity will come along when you least expect it, as it did for me. You may not even recognize it at the time. Your job is to be as ready as possible when that good fortune comes your way.”
    4 points
  28. I had one of my favorite things to make when I'm home alone- garlic croissants. I take the packaged tube croissants, put a little spoonful of garlic in the middle before rolling them up, and bake. Yummy. Have I mentioned I REALLY like garlic? I'm on a diet so I'm not doing all my usual treats when dh isn't home - Ben & Jerry's, chocolate frosted donuts kept in the fridge, lots of other chocolate and sweets. I'm going to have a big salad for dinner since I ate an entire package of croissants for lunch.
    4 points
  29. Ugh. Do people like this not wear seatbelts, because they have Jesus? Or not look both ways before crossing the street, because they have Jesus? Or keep a fire extinguisher in the house, because they have Jesus? Moving back one row is NOT anymore difficult than looking both ways before you cross the street. I do NOT understand this logic! And i hear it a lot!
    4 points
  30. I recently read We Were Eight Years in Power and it explained some of what was going on during Obama's presidency and the results which we are seeing today from it.
    4 points
  31. Queen's Man, and, Cruel as the Grave The first 2 books in the 4-book medieval mystery series by Sharon Kay Penman. I wasn't sure I was going to "click" with this series, but after the first chapter or two, I was really absorbed in the world, and was very much enjoying the political intrigue, and the slowly developing partnership/friendship between the main character, the illegitimate Justin whose mother died at his birth and whose Archbishop father refuses to acknowledge him, and Luke, the under sheriff of a town outside of London. Set in the year 1193, during all of Prince John's machinations to grab the throne while King Richard the Lionheart is held for ransom on the continent, Justin is drawn into a mystery and court intrigue, and becomes a "queen's man" to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the powerful queen dowager. What a woman Eleanor of Aquitaine was! Wife to 2 kings (first to Louis VII of France, then Henry II of England), and mother of 3 kings (Henry the Young King; Richard Lion-Heart; and John). She was born in 1122, became queen at age 15 by marriage, had 10 children (2 with Louis, 8 with Henry), went on the Crusades with her first husband, survived several sieges, survived the political upheaval of 3 of her sons revolting against their father, Henry II and was placed under "castle arrest" by her husband, Henry, for 16 years. After his death, she returned to London, and was a huge political force during her son Richard's rule and as he went off on a Crusade. She survived into the 13th century, living to be 82yo. Sharon Kay Penman has also written a number of fictional biographies: a series on Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Plantagenet dynasty, and a trilogy on the 13th century Welsh Princes. And the stand-alone book Sunne in Splendor, about the last king (Richard III) and the 15th century War of the Roses. That last book was one I read a few years ago, based on recommendations from several people on the BaW threads! 😄 Now I'm off to hit the "buy" button on books 3 & 4 of the medieval mysteries, waiting in the Amazon cart!
    4 points
  32. Some additional seminal works: Up from Slavery, non-fiction The Mis-education of the Negro, non-fiction The Souls of Black Folks, non-fiction The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, non-fiction The Color of Law, non-fiction
    4 points
  33. Hey, where is everyone? Second morning in the hotel, hoping to head home before too long. Yesterday's BLM march here was again peaceful. Thank God, and thank all the local people involved. Done: Shower & hair wash & working on my 2nd coffee. Sent out some work. Caught up on news, emails, social media. To do: Not really sure about most of it. Work. Drive home. Yoga, TKD practice, walking. Wanted to start a new read-aloud yesterday ... maybe today. Kid2 is due home at an undisclosed time, maybe today and possibly tomorrow.... Ahh summer vacation ....
    4 points
  34. Oh mercy, I think I'd just to go Urgent Care today and be done with it. I've been told they see a lot of those kinds of things (stuff in crevices) so they're really good at it.
    4 points
  35. I am still having trouble breaking old bad habits, but his technique of piggybacking new desired habits onto old ones is genius.
    4 points
  36. 1. George Floyd’s murder was one of many caused by police brutality. Make a difference by paying attention to laws and practices of your local police force. Donate money to groups working to make national change—they have reach and expertise you do not have, but you can help fund them. As a white mom who has consistently done my part to educate my children about race, diversity, etc., I feel like the only way to make this bad stuff fully go away is to make policy changes addressing, in this case, police brutality. It is clear to me that, while they will change our future generation for the better, our efforts at good parenting in this area are not a fast enough solution. 2. Do not seek to have influence over the opinions of people you don’t have influence over already. That includes family who ignore you. Focus on people who actually listen to you. Think of yourself as lighting the next candle. We can’t all be the type of person that engages in debates with people, psychoanalyzes others and behaves like ideological college students. You don’t have to do that stuff to make a change. 3. Just do the right thing day to day in the life you lead. If you live in a diverse community try meeting a wider variety of people. If you know people exist, then you are available to help them personally when they have needs. Like a community member. Don’t worry about people looking down on you for either “being liberal” or “acting like a white savior.” Those perceptions do not matter—You know you are just trying to do the right thing by those in your sphere. Brainstorm ways you realistically can do that, then leave other stuff to other people. You can only do what -you- can do. If you read the idea of “home” as “sense of safety, security or agency,” this quote from Bilbo in the Hobbit movie describes a way to think about helping from your place (with your own “books, arm chair and garden”) in our world: ”I know you doubt me, I know you always have, and you’re right. I often think of Bag End. I miss my books, and my arm chair, and my garden. See, that’s where I belong; that’s home, and that’s why I came because you don’t have one...a home. It was taken from you, but I will help you take it back if I can.”
    4 points
  37. Well, since I am signing up for mandolin lessons, daily practice will have to become a new habit.
    4 points
  38. I cannot emphasize enough how wonderful the poetry curriculum is. It isn’t just the content, it’s the way he injects a spirit of awe and wonder toward the use of language into every lesson. I taught the 3rd and 4th grade books at grade level at a small private school and poetry was absolutely the highlight of our time together - and later teachers told me how those students retained both the concepts and a love for poetry.
    4 points
  39. I asked a similar question on Facebook and got a couple reading lists in response. I don't personally know very many POC (I live in the rural Midwest), but the POC I do know didn't respond, so the lists were from other white women. Which may or may not be helpful, I don't even know enough to know. I'm not terribly interested in changing anyone else's mind because I rarely see that being successful, but I do want to be able to change my own mind and heart to be more compassionate and supportive. So I will be reading this thread with interest!
    4 points
  40. I have a 6 year old boy, too! I would start by thinking about what he's capable of right now and what areas you want to prioritize in the coming year (or months). Language Arts covers so many bits and pieces that if you go full force on all of them, you'll eat up all your time. For example, my big goals this last year were to make as much progress with reading as possible while keeping him happy and confident and to build his writing willingness and stamina so that he could be independent for 5 or so minutes at a time. He's now reading well enough to navigate video games, and he can enjoy a funny story when buddy reading. He no longer loathes drawing and writing and will even color a picture or write a few words spontaneously sometimes. My goals for the coming year are to help him improve his reading to the point where it can be a fun independent activity and help him start writing the words in his head in a way others can read them. We'll focus on these areas by buddy reading a lot of fun books and working through All About Spelling level 1. We'll do some handwriting as well, and we'll keep doing lots of read alouds that build vocabulary and comprehension, but he is strong in those areas and I don't feel a need to belabor them. We do some narrations right after reading, but more often we do a "quick, who can remind us what's been going on in this book" before we read the next chapter of an enjoyable read aloud. I have a big book of worksheets for those times when I need to give him something to do and can't work directly with him the whole time (one of four kids), but he likes that as long as it's not overdone. With another child I would do more copy work, perhaps, but this one would find that painfully meaningless at this point.
    4 points
  41. Establishing a better chore system and bedtime routine before baby comes. Each time. And I never stopped after my last. It's not enough to be annoying. Lol! Conservative. Matt's a conservative white guy so I guess he was supposed to be the tie breaker? I don't know, but he avoided it.
    4 points
  42. I am actually not doing anything different next year. It’s a little weird, but it is nice, too.
    4 points
  43. For first grade Language arts I had the following goals for writing and reading: Writing: 1) help my child believe that he was a writer. 2) discuss ideas with my child, because writing is really thinking. and 3) help my child with the mechanics of language (handwriting, spelling, sentence formation etc) Reading: When my child was an early reader, I wanted him to 4) feel the joy of independent reading, 5) hear and discuss books too hard for him to read. 6) slowly ever so slowly build up his skill level Once I had my goals, I would figure out how to achieve them. 1) Help my child believe that he was a writer: I encouraged story telling and wrote down my kids stories. I celebrated all writing and was not critical (we are talking 6 and 7 year olds!). Meeting this goal was not about curriculum, but about my attitude towards writing and my perception of the role of the teacher. I can discuss more of this if you want, but it is incredibly important. 2) Discuss ideas with my child. Kids can't write if they have nothing to say. This goal is about *talking* to your kid. Lots of verbal discussion at the dinner table, while walking, during and after reading a book. It is just about developing depth of thinking. A purchased curriculum can't really do this. Which is why homeschooling is so great! 3) Help my child with the mechanics of language. For my kids, I just had them copy the Cat in the Hat and then other books that they enjoyed. If a child is ready, you could do some simple dictation, but it would depend on the child. We discussed phonics in context of their copy work and in context of them reading out loud to me. We continues with 10 minutes of handwriting that was beyond the copy work. I bought Getty Dubai workbooks. I did more formal grammar and spelling programs in 2nd and 3rd grade. 4) Feel the joy of independent reading. We went to the library every week and I had him pick out readers that he was interested in. Then we created a special snuggle time for reading where we would both read on the sofa. I acted as a model, and reading was connected to a peaceful special time with mom. 5) Hear and discuss harder books. My dh was in charge of this. Every. single. night. he would read out loud for an hour after he got home from work. We chose to have him read through history with cool library books, but he also read literature like Charlotte's Web etc. He and my boys talked almost as much as he read. Discussion is key to developing insight. 6) Slowly every so slowly build up skill level. I did a lot of research as to what was on the next level of books. Once we got past readers, I would make an annual list of appropriate leveled novels, and let them pick off the list. I would talk up each book, describe it enthusiastically, and then whichever one they chose for the next book, we would get it at the library that week. Some I did purchase. I also got them to find nonfiction that they were interested in. I often helped them pick through books at the library that were of an appropriate level. So that is how I created a LA curriculum for my 1st graders. Goals first, then how you will meet these goals. Purchased curriculum can definitely be a part of meeting your goals, but often it was only a small part for us. Ruth in NZ
    4 points
  44. The only reason planning's not fun anymore is that I've been doing this long enough to know I still have to implement it. 🤦‍♀️🙄😳😬😩
    4 points
  45. Yep, I did mine last week for the first time. But I’ve cut the guys here for years so figured I could do it. It was interesting backwards in the mirror but turned out fine. Not as perfect a pixie as I get at the salon but sometimes those aren’t great either. I figured it’s summer, I wear a ball cap a lot outside, & I’m not teaching in person right now so why not!
    4 points
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