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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/11/2019 in all areas

  1. Y'all. I'll never be able to look my mailman in the eyes again. If you read the stunt panty thread, you'll remember I ordered several items...one of which finally arrived today (a month later, courtesy China post). Honestly, I'd forgotten about it. So the (very tiny) package arrived today. Like literally a 6x6 square envelope. You can feel there's not much substance in there. And it required a SIGNATURE! And not realizing what it was, I was like "what is this?" and Mr. Postman said "Um...it says women's pajamas." Oh...ooooooohhh. So I sign. I get the tiny package inside, and no, what the package *actually* says on the customs line is "women's SEXY pajamas!" OMG, hahaha. With that teensy package, and I'm a bigger gal, haha. How deliciously awkward. 😄 I'm still giggling.
    40 points
  2. Mom's reaction may be because he's not just deciding to get his vaccines but he is saying things like "It's a miracle I'm still alive." I'd be hurt if my kids went beyond the "We're just doing things differently than you did.." to publicly insinuating that I was a terrible parent.
    10 points
  3. My dd only applied to one school, and she got in! Texas A&M - Corpus Christi (Presidential Scholarship).
    10 points
  4. I'm *still* working on Spiritual Depression: Its Causes and Cure (Martyn Lloyd-Jones). I've had more reading time this past week than the previous one, but not quite enough to finish the book! I think I'll get it done within the next day or two, though. I haven't decided what I'll read next.
    10 points
  5. I don't believe there should be such a thing as $50,000 bills for life saving health care in a nation wealthy as ours. This family had insurance. Yeah, they clearly made a bunch of mistakes. But this is madness.
    10 points
  6. I don’t think that a delayed or selective vaxxer is an anti- vaxxer. Anti- vaxxers are against all vaccination. That’s the anti part.
    8 points
  7. In this case he was allowed to do it because he is 18. But in some controlling families, young adults (often girls especially) still aren’t allowed to make their own decisions. And breaking free is difficult financially and emotionally. Especially because SOMETIMES these are the same families who don’t homeschool their kids well in the high school years and don’t provide ID necessary to live on their own. No, antivaxxers aren’t a monolithic group but they are more prominent in certain ideological communities.
    8 points
  8. I finished The Red Badge of Courage. It took a while to get going, but about half way through my interest increased and I was able to finish it fairly quickly. To give myself a break from the classics I've been working through, I read The Princess Diaries. And then I watched the movie with some of my girls just because. :) I'm still working through The Man in the Iron Mask. I am really enjoying it and it doesn't bother me that I'm taking a while to get through it. Usually I feel like I have to rush to get to the end of a book, but this one (for me) is like a really, really rich dessert that you appreciate more fully in small quantities.
    8 points
  9. Not sure if I can fully participate in this one. Romance novels are so boring to me unless there is a lot of wit or a murder somewhere. Can I count Georgette Heyer's "The Grand Sophy" as Flufferton (from last week) and one of Heyer's other books, "April Lady" as a romance? Audiobook: The Grand Sophy by Georgette Heyer. Funny and reminiscent of Austen Books: "April Lady" by Heyer - have just started. Too early to know but judging from the little I read, it's going to be good. "Backfire" by Coulter. Another thriller / murder. I can't seem to stop. Non-Fiction: "The Psychopath Inside" by James Fallon. A book about brain science presented in a very accessible and quirky style. "The I 5 Serial Killer" by Henderson. Finishing this one up. I don't want to drive at night anymore now...
    8 points
  10. Oh, yes, I can see why. It would make some very interesting table conversations if more than one person had read it (it's even interesting, enough, with just me rabbiting on about it... I'm trying to talk the Dc into listening to it too 😉 ). Laughing! No, we'd still be short of the total tally, I've not read any of those.
    8 points
  11. Hi All… Finally popping back in after a hectic start to the new year. DD caught the flu, I had emergency gallbladder surgery and we've been travelling. My reading has suffered for it, but now we are at home and healthy, so I expect it to pick back up. Robin - I love that poem. Thanks for including it this week. A few weeks ago I finally finished Roger Ackroyd. I enjoyed this one so much more as a re-read. It gave me such a different perspective while reading it since I knew whodunnit. I thought that would make me enjoy it less, but instead I was way more plugged into the clues and that caused me to marvel at Christie's genius. I just completed Death of a Red Heroine by Qiu Xiaolong. I really enjoyed this one! Thanks for the suggestion! DD is reading Justice The Right Thing to Do by Sandel. It's mostly for school, but I find her reading it in her free time, so I think it's a hit. I'm currently reading The Remains of the Day by Ishiguro and The Big Four by Christie. I've never read the The Big Four and I am thoroughly enjoying it. I'm also working my way through Mary Oliver's A Poetry Handbook. This little book is teaching me so much. I understand meter better than I every have and she has introduced to me to several poets I've never read before.
    8 points
  12. Looking back, I finished more books than I thought this week... maybe because I'm still reading Kirsten... Finished four: 12. The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life by David Quammen (ebook) - I liked this book. Many reviews complain he spends too much time talking about Woese, but I find all the personal stuff interesting (as well as the science). 4 stars. 13. Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons (ebook) - Though I have yet to comment on the other threads, I read this in a day. I liked it, but partly since I didn't manage to slow down and read it in sections, have needed time to process to comment in that much detail. I might just comment on the third thread so I don't have to figure out how to separate out my thoughts... 4 stars. 14. How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu - A lot of stuff never explained (what is a science fictional universe? Is he in our universe or a pocket universe? Where does he get his food while living 10 years in a small box outside of time? How does the nonexistent dog have slobber and body heat? Why did the author name his very fictional time-traveling protagonist after himself? - and much more...), but then just as I was thinking it was mostly absurdist and silly fluff, there was a long section on his father which touched on a lot of interesting themes of being a recent immigrant and finding one's path, dysfunctional family dynamics, ambition, regrets, and just generally being present for your life (or not). A bit too much unnecessary wrapping around that for me (The author should have possibly written a foreword saying the book was a way for him to write about his relationship with his dad, similar to what Jesse Ball did in next book), but overall 3 stars. 15. Census by Jesse Ball - there is a foreword that explains that Ball wrote this book as a way to write about his brother with Down's Syndrome, and how he had imagined his relationship with him would be if he had lived longer and he'd been his caretaker (which he had always thought he would be). The book itself is set in some kind of future that's different (seems to be a very different form of government and many less people) which is never explained. So it helps a lot to know that that is irrelevant to the story. There's also a lot about cormorants and clowning. And yet I found it to be a lovely, contemplative story. The framework is that a recently widowed old man, a doctor, has been given a short time to live, and he quits his job and takes his grown son with Down's Syndrome on a road trip to take the census (which is not like a normal census and whose real purpose is never explained). 4 stars. Currently reading: - The Cross (Kirsten Lavransdatter #3) - I should make more time for that and finish it! - Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward (audiobook) - Irgendwo in Deutschland / Somewhere in Germany by Stefanie Zweig - This is billed as an 'autobiographical novel' - but unlike Laura Ingalls Wilder, who though she heavily fictionalized her story used her family's real names, or James Herriot, whose wonderful books are much more fictionalized than I realized but whose character shares his pen name, though not his real one, Zweig's characters have different names than her family's though the story is very much based on her life story - her family fled to Kenya to escape the Nazis (told in her previous book, Nowhere in Africa), and then 9 years later, after WWII was over, returned to Germany in spite of being Jewish (and although they had escaped, their extended family was wiped out). It's an interesting perspective to be writing from. No one can understand why they returned (including her character and her mother's). Her father was a lawyer, and he wanted to continue working as a lawyer, and as he could only speak German fluently, and was only licensed to practice law in Germany, he thought this was the thing to do.
    8 points
  13. The thing is, it is a public health issue that people exposed to rabies should get rabies vaccinations. Of course most of us are knowledgeable enough that we would cough it up in payments for however long we had to, because we would know better than to take any chances with rabies. But my thoughts when I read this story were that someone not (trying to be generous here?) aware enough to realize that what they were allowing with the bats was dangerous, might not be aware enough to realize that YOU MUST get vaccinated whether you are going to get a giant bill or not. I could totally see a person maybe even hearing about or reading about this story, then getting exposed and thinking, it's probably fine. I'm not going to pay $5000 when I might not even have it. I am appalled at anyone having to go into debt for ANY medical treatment. But surely society has an interest in people getting vaccinated for what could be a public health issue? I would be absolutely in favor of having things like that covered by the state or the feds for the uninsured or underinsured. There should not be an economic reason not to get a rabies vaccination if you have been exposed.
    8 points
  14. 😥 FWIW I am totally sympathetic to parents like you. There are risks to vaccines, although rare, and yes there are some people that are hurt by them. I have zero problem with anyone having those actual experiences in their family doing what they need to do. To me that is why the rest of us "average folk" need to be vaccinated. I do not put that into the same category as ideological objections based on misinformation on the internet.
    7 points
  15. So what are you going to name your new cat and kittens? 😉
    7 points
  16. hahaha We don't get any of our packages here. Maybe I should try ordering that sort of thing The women in the diocesan office would love it.
    7 points
  17. First post updated with all the great acceptances and couple of decisions (starred and bolded). Let me know if I missed something/someone or put something wrong. Congrats to all the acceptances. Hugs to all who haven't gotten the news they wanted. High fives to the kids who already made their decisions. I can see that there are others who will have a tough decision to make. People keep asking my DD where she's going. DD jokes that she will either make a very detailed spreadsheet of weighted factors or toss the names in a hat. The random draw won't take as long . . .
    7 points
  18. Still listening my way through The Others, only two more to go and then I will be ready for the new book! The Sunday Philosophy Club https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15904.The_Sunday_Philosophy_Club is a book that has been recommended to me for years, I have checked it out many times........I have never actually looked at a single page of it before. 😍Oh my! I am in love with this series, it isn’t perfectly lovely like a DE Stevenson, but it is a good read at 60%. I actually checked the next one out already. My Scottish reading shelf for the 10’s is why I finally opened this book........thanks Robin! Now back to the Good Housekeeping top 20 romances.....I haven’t read the 2 1/2 books @Kareni is missing either!
    7 points
  19. Dd has begun a brand spanking new schooling year and we’ve started reading the book of Esther out of The Life Application Bible (love that book!) together, she’s reading The Fallacy Detective (quick logic review ) out aloud to us both and we’re back to daily poetry reading too. I’ll be counting those books towards my reading tally. It is nice to have our school morning routine up and running again. Completed: The Book of Job (The Life Application Bible - KJV) I prefer my printed copy of this book, but it’s still a bit heavy for me to start wielding about again, so the kindle version makes for a good 2nd in the interim. One Child: The Story of China's Most Radical Experiment ~ Mei Fong, narrated by Janet Song (epukapuka) (5) N/F China I wouldn’t recommend this as a read for a few IRL friends who are navigating through ’beyond coping’ circumstances – portions of it make for very tough reading. (for anyone who may be interested, @Quill , I posted a review on goodreads ) Carnegie's Maid ~ Marie Benedict, narrated by Alana Kerr Collins (epukapuka audio) (2-3*) Goodreads review The portions of the book I listened to were definitely clean romance, not sure about the 3 chapters I skipped 😄 The Lady of Quality ~ Georgette Heyer (repeat night time listen. Definitely counts as flufferton) (3) Currently reading/listening to: The Spanish Helmet: Dr. Matthew Cameron Bk1 ~ Greg Scown (kindle) NZ author/ fiction based theorectical NZ history The reality of this book is currently not meeting my hoped for expectations of it – the dialogue reads like a B grade movie, and, the characters are rather one dimensional. I’m going to give it a chance and see if things improve. Quirkology: The Curious Science of Everyday Lives ~ Richard Wiseman, narrated by Peter Noble N/F Thank you (!) for this recommendation @Kareni it’s making for interesting, rather fun, listening so far. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell ~ Susanna Clarke, narrated by Simon Prebble ebook & audio Oh my! Be still my heart: the writing style and use of language in this book is gorgeous!
    7 points
  20. I just finished a book that I quite enjoyed -- The Hum and the Shiver: A Novel of the Tufa. by Alex Bledsoe. I think that others here might also enjoy it. "The Hum and the Shiver by Alex Bledsoe is an enchanting tale of music and magic older than the hills, and the first book in the wondrous Tufa series. . . . "Imagine a book somewhere between American Gods and Faulkner. In brief: a good book. Absolutely worth your time."—Patrick Rothfuss, New York Times bestselling author, on The Hum and the Shiver Private Bronwyn Hyatt had left her small town of Needsville for the army to escape the pressures of her mystical Tufa family legacy. She returns a lone survivor after a disastrous attack overseas, wounded in body and spirit. But cryptic omens warn of impending tragedy, and a restless haint lurks nearby, waiting to reveal Bronwyn's darkest secrets. Now Bronwyn finds the greatest battle lies right in her backyard, especially as young minister with too much curiosity arrives in town. If she makes the wrong choice, the consequences could be deadly for all the Tufa. . . ." I am definitely interested in reading on in the series. I see there are six books in all. Regards, Kareni
    7 points
  21. School. No snow days for us! (I have been accused of being draconian by some of our neighbors. . . ) 😉 proofread and format the bylaws
    6 points
  22. If anyone wants my new address like my post and I'll pm you.
    6 points
  23. I remember thinking that sanitation and western medicine would save us...that was definitely the spiel, along with the supposed autism link, back in the day. But here's where I was very different, as an anti/selective vaxxing parent in the late 90s: I *always* said these two things: 1. If/when the balance ever shifted and it seemed that the disease was more dangerous than the vax again, we would, without hesitation, get the vax, and 2. I thought the compulsory vax laws should stay on the books. Most states have laws allowing quarantines during epidemics for those won't immunize; I thought that was important. So that's where I part ways with today's crowd. I do NOT understand them. In the late 90s, we were definitely ignorant and hornswoggled. No question. But we thought our kids were "safe" from the diseases, and we'd been led to believe the vaccines might not be safe. Today's crowd doesn't care if their children get deadly VPDs or spread them to even more fragile children. And we know more about herd immunity and necessary percentages. And the autism thing has been debunked. AND if there was an autism link, during an actual epidemic, why do people think autism is worse than sickness, permanent damage, or death? Who are these people?? Signed, 90s anti/selective vaxxer whose children were immediately, fully vaccinated as soon as the Wakefield thing was debunked. (Edit: I became "anti/selective" because we were working with actual autism diagnoses at the time of the Wakefield hysteria, and we did have some vax reactions that made us want to do one at a time, at least. We continued that policy even though we eventually got everyone fully vaxed. So I was never an ideological vax hater - we were just unsure what we were dealing with, and in the process of spacing out the overload we stumbled into anti-vax world and camped awhile.)
    6 points
  24. If I'd had my bearings, I would've joked, "Just in time for Valentines Day!" Hahaha!
    6 points
  25. Coffee, breakfast, meds, pets (done) Decided to skip outside classes today so good there schedule hair appointment schedule primary doctor appointment schedule eye dr. appointment bath or shower dance (best exercise for me) dog trainer appointment plan meals, do shopping list go shopping dinner
    6 points
  26. Good morning! Regular Monday here. ds3 got home late last night, so he is still sleeping. I have a lot of random things to do today and am slowly starting today. coffee/paper write laundry bills/emails/texts/phone calls school with ds3 general clean up get scans for dd2's second opinion appointment SAT tutor ds3 to tennis figure out dinner Have a great day!
    6 points
  27. Oh, Jean's sharing, all right. 😒 Come to my house. We should have close to a foot and a half by Wednesday. Of new snow. We also have a frozen base of...a lot. Normally, this would be fine, but the Boo wants to go to a Junior Preview Day at Willamette on the 23rd. I was hoping to take the little car, because it would be easier on her back. But, no, it's looking like the ancient Sequoia with studded tires is gonna be the thing. 🤨
    6 points
  28. Good morning! School with ds and help dd plan her day. ✅ Order Sunday school curriculum. ✅ Make dinner, if time. Nope. Load my car for consignment sale drop off. Work at the sale for 6 hrs and drop off my stuff while I'm there. Come home, take a shower, and get ready for Tuesday. Check registration for dd's online Latin class to see if next yr's schedule is up yet. ✅
    6 points
  29. Good morning! My canine alarm clock woke me at 3 am to go outside. At least this time I was able to go back to sleep. DS14 has finished both of his FLVS classes for the year (Honors Biology and Spanish I) so his school days have gotten much lighter. Debating whether I should start him on Spanish II right away or just wait until next year. -coffee -laundry (only one load) -read (goal: 100 pages) -DS14 physical at 10:30 -make sure DS14 completes his paper that is due today -school -lunch with a friend -bank to deposit check -set up two "do not pack" boxes (one to take to apartment, one of things to leave for buyer) -think about what we need for 2 weeks in between houses (need to check SC weather to know what clothes to pack) -make sure DS14 does his application for AP English class next year -send DS14 vaccine record to school he is applying to for next year -dinner (left over eggs in purgatory)
    6 points
  30. Got up early to try to work. But I have an intense pain in my back. Like a bad stiff neck only lower down. I am trying to convince my body to cooperate, but may have to lie back down. Should be a normal Monday. Reports out. Kids off to school. Tell the driver of this week's plans. More reports out. Finish the laundry. Pay bills. Contact the zoo so I can sign up for their summer camp (the website isn't letting me). School forms and such. Kids' evening work. Kid off to gymnastics. Kids to bed. Whatever else gets done.
    6 points
  31. Kindle books on sale today. Lilac Girls - historical fiction - WWII A Lowcountry Heart: Reflections on a Writing Life - memoir
    6 points
  32. Yeah, this doesn't sound like a great life for hedgehogs, tbh. Spend all night stuck in a cage, running off your energy on a wheel that goes nowhere, pooping all over your feet? Sorry, but I'd trade possible predation, uncertain food supply, possibility of disease, and a lot more in order to have the natural hedgehog freedom of running around over grass and under bushes, pooping on the ground (not my feet!) and finding a hedgehog wife and smelling the fresh air and looking at the stars. Some animals just aren't meant to be domesticated.
    6 points
  33. I've read a few: Gone with the Wind, Pride and Prejudice, Thorn Birds, Outlander, Dark Lover, Jane Eyre, Vision in White, and Rosie Project.
    6 points
  34. I'm so glad you're enjoying it! It generated some interesting dinner table conversations here. The real question is whether together we've read all twenty. My two and a half unread were Fallen Too Far, The Notebook, and This Man. Regards, Kareni
    6 points
  35. I'm a non-starter, I've read two and a half. Seconding @Mothersweets some pretty racy looking covers/titles there.
    6 points
  36. Hello everyone! I started two books last week that I am really liking (knock on wood): The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America by Tommy Tomlinson. Really good so far. and my bedtime kindle read Mistress of the Art of Death by Ariana Franklin. My aunt recommended this to me a few years ago and I finally got around to it. I'm around the 20% mark and am looking forward to reading more. Robin, I've read 6 out of Good Housekeeping's list. Some of those look pretty racy!
    6 points
  37. Robin, I love that poem. Thank you for sharing. I read Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont - 4 Stars - Although this story has an underlying touch of sadness, it was a delightful read. This is one of those books where nothing much happens, and it’s more about the prose, the depth of the characters, and the relationships. The story is about elderly people living in a London hotel during the late 1960s. The ending was a bit abrupt, but it was truly a lovely book. Some of my favorite quotes: “Everything she did was unhurried, almost authoritative. She had always known how to behave. Even as a bride, in strange, alarming conditions in Burma, she had been magnificent, calm – when (for instance) she was rowed across floods to her new home; unruffled, finding it more than damp, with a snake wound round the banisters to greet her. She had straightened her back and given herself a good talking-to, as she had this afternoon in the train.” "I must not wish my life away, she told herself; but she knew that, as she got older, she looked at her watch more often, and that it was always earlier than she had thought it would be. When she was young, it had always been later.” “She realised that she never walked now without knowing what she was doing and concentrating upon it; once, walking had been like breathing, something unheeded. The disaster of being old was in not feeling safe to venture anywhere …” “As one gets older life becomes all take and no give. One relies on other people for the treats and things. It’s like being an infant again.” “It was like being a baby, in reverse. Every day for an infant means some new little thing learned; every day for the old means some little thing lost. Names slip away, dates mean nothing, sequences become muddled, and faces blurred. Both infancy and age are tiring times.” MY RATING SYSTEM 5 Stars The book is fantastic. It’s not perfect, since no book is, but it’s definitely a favorite of mine. 4 Stars Really Good 3 Stars Enjoyable 2 Stars Just Okay – nothing to write home about 1 Star Rubbish – waste of my money and time. Few books make it to this level, since I usually give up on them if they’re that bad.
    6 points
  38. Happy Sunday and welcome to week seven in our 52 Books rambling roads reading adventure. Greetings to all our readers, welcome to all who are joining in for the first time, and everyone following our progress. Visit 52 Books in 52 Weeks where you can find all the information on the annual, mini and perpetual challenges, as well as the central spot to share links to your book reviews. Exit by A.M. Klein (February 14, 1909 - February 20, 1972) The street is great festivity; Snow is a royal canopy, Made for a lover, made for me. This is the way love should go: Winter, an orchard walk where blow blossom petals of white snow. Kisses of mine which lent a grace To Summer, run a frozen race. Snowflake kissing, all my face. Love is in the air along with plenty of candy kisses, chocolate dishes, golden rings and red rose hearts. Odes to love abound accompanied by wine and song as well as our kiddo's nose nuzzles and heart felt wishes. Welcome to Valentine's week and the celebration of poetry and novels to literary couples and diversity in romance. Collection of classic love and romance poems 13 Kickass Literary Power Couples Buzzfeed's 14 of the Best Couples from Books 20 Couples In English Literature Who Changed The Way We Look At Romance Forever Goodhousekeeping's 20 Best Romance Novels of all time. Bookriot's The Best Romance Authors and their must read Book plus 100 Must Read Books by International Romance Authors. Gentlemen Speak: 5 Romantic Books Guys Actually Love Harlequin's Guide to Romance Genres The Changing Face of Romance Novels Ten Best Historical Romance Novels of all Time Popular Diverse Romance Books African romance novels heat things up Romance and Romantic Suspense set in the Middle East Have fun following rabbit trails! What are you reading? Link to week six
    5 points
  39. Our mailman already thinks we're nuts. I'm sure he's noticed every single thing I've ordered that's "sexy."
    5 points
  40. In the late 90s, early 00s, a lot of antis did seem to think this way IME. They looked to the info in that stupid Shot in the Dark book and believed that diseases like Diphtheria were “going away on their own” due to improved sanitation and better treatment and nutrition, and did not, in fact, drastically drop in incidence due to vaccines. Thus, they believed that with superior nutrition their kids would not contract measels, say, even if there were a local outbreak. Some also thought the diseases were “no big deal,” either because they believed their super-healthy, sugar-free, crunchy kids would effectively fight the virus and thus, symptoms would be minor, or because possibly in some instances, they did not understand how devastating things like pertussis can actually be.
    5 points
  41. The mailman will never look at you the same way again!!! 😁
    5 points
  42. Lincoln’s Birthday. The “official holiday” is next Monday, President’s Day, but schools are taking today off, too. And this is an official “Hail to the Chief” Booya/h.
    5 points
  43. Sharing is caring!!!!!😂😂😂😂😂
    5 points
  44. Good Morning!!!!! COFFEE!!!!~D Monday!!😩 but..... it is a holiday. Technically our charter is taking the holiday on Friday, I guess to get a 4-day weekend in there, but I desperately need today off, and the local schools are taking today off and my little girls are dying to play with their friends from the old neighborhood, so, we are taking today off. No snow here, but it’s frosty out.
    5 points
  45. Good morning! Another day, another Winter Storm Warning...another foot of snow is on its way. I am usually the one who hates being cooped up in the house and loves to get outside, but I am seriously at the point of crawling under a blanket and staying there for the rest of the winter. If only I could find someone to do my chores for me so I could hibernate in peace... school w/dd remember that we need to get her an ID for her upcoming ACT office work (get bank deposits together, print out some bills) dust & vacuum upstairs checkup & routine bloodwork for my old pup Buttercup at 2:00 - she is due for a dental cleaning (and really needs it - her breath is deadly) but I need to discuss with the vet whether that would be wise, given her old age and heart arrythmia run errands (bank, post office, get gas) dinner: minestrone soup
    5 points
  46. Good Monday Morning! That seems like an oxymoron. Three classes and two tutoring students today. I'm kind of hoping for a snow day tomorrow but really not. I'm off next week for Presidents day week. If there's a work-off holiday, I take off the week to keep all my classes on the same schedule except for snow days. Easier to keep track.
    5 points
  47. Better do a spreadsheet, too, just in case.
    5 points
  48. I have only read 10 of the books in the Good Housekeeping Top 20 link.......I need to add some of these to my hold’s list.😉
    5 points
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