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"Homeschooling doesn't work."


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#1 TaraTheLiberator

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 07:25 PM

My dd, who is 14 and in 8th grade in public school, told me that one of her teachers spent about 20 minutes today dogging homeschooling because two kids said that they wanted to be homeschooled because they didn't get into the high schools they wanted.

Apparently, "homeschooling doesn't work" because homeschooled kids don't learn "everything they need to know." If they ever chose to come back to school, they would be behind because they would have "missed a lot of stuff." Additionally, parents are not qualified to homeschool because we "don't have the appropriate degree." Oh, and of course, you're "very lonely" when you homeschool.

My dd said, "Well, I was homeschooled. My brother and sister are homeschooled."

At which point the teacher said, "Well, your brother and sister will be fine because your mom is very smart, but homeschooling usually doesn't work."

I told my dd to tell this teacher that I just attended a homeschool conference with thousands of families who would prove him wrong.

As an aside, I get really tired of the school employees discussing things with my dd's class that they have no business discussing. My dd doesn't need to know her math teacher's opinion on abortion and condoms, her social studies teacher's opinion on whether god exists, or her enrichment teacher's opinions on why homeschooling doesn't work. *sigh*

Tara

#2 Lovedtodeath

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 07:31 PM

As an aside, I get really tired of the school employees discussing things with my dd's class that they have no business discussing. My dd doesn't need to know her math teacher's opinion on abortion and condoms, her social studies teacher's opinion on whether god exists, or her enrichment teacher's opinions on why homeschooling doesn't work. *sigh*

I agree! Your DD is a success story is she not? Sounds like she is doing fine in school. It sounds like that teacher had a major foot in the mouth moment.

I think the kids wanting to be homeschooled are better off discussing it with their parents though.:tongue_smilie:

Edited by Lovedtodeath, 21 April 2009 - 07:36 PM.


#3 Rhondabee

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 07:32 PM

As an aside, I get really tired of the school employees discussing things with my dd's class that they have no business discussing. My dd doesn't need to know her math teacher's opinion on abortion and condoms, her social studies teacher's opinion on whether god exists, or her enrichment teacher's opinions on why homeschooling doesn't work. *sigh*

Tara



:grouphug:

I understand!

#4 elegantlion

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 07:51 PM

My dd said, "Well, I was homeschooled. My brother and sister are homeschooled."

At which point the teacher said, "Well, your brother and sister will be fine because your mom is very smart, but homeschooling usually doesn't work."

I told my dd to tell this teacher that I just attended a homeschool conference with thousands of families who would prove him wrong.


Would a t-shirt that says "Your mouth keeps moving but all I here is blah, blah, blah" be inappropriate school attire? :D

Unfortunately most people don't show their ignorance until they try to appear as an expert on something that they know nothing about. (Public school teachers aren't the only ones, I'm sure I've had a few foot in mouth moments)

#5 SheWillFly

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:03 PM

As an aside, I get really tired of the school employees discussing things with my dd's class that they have no business discussing.

:iagree: We've had to deal with this and my oldest is 7 and in first grade. A few weeks ago. My daughter told the teacher we were homeschooling next year. The teacher's reply was "I don't think that is a good idea.":mad:

#6 MamaT

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:11 PM

I think ps teachers feel like successful homeschool parents make them look bad. After all, we are doing a good job without all the training and education they have (most of us, anyway).

I think the thought of someone being able to give their child/children an excellent education at home makes them insecure - and insecure people lash out.

#7 5sons

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:39 PM

has a digree in education. Unfortunately it took me years to over come that handycap:glare:. It would have been better for me if I had gotten a degree in science or forign laguage or something I could have used with my kids! KWIM;)

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#8 Ohdanigirl

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 08:44 PM

has a digree in education. Unfortunately it took me years to over come that handycap:glare:. It would have been better for me if I had gotten a degree in science or forign laguage or something I could have used with my kids! KWIM;)

Kris



ooh ooh idea idea...If you have 30 kids and homeschool them in a smaill room you'll get to use crowd control skills and busy work. PS made me so smart.:D

#9 mama2cntrykids

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 09:14 PM

ooh ooh idea idea...If you have 30 kids and homeschool them in a smaill room you'll get to use crowd control skills and busy work. PS made me so smart.:D


LOL Too funny!

#10 LUV2EDU

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 09:25 PM

My dd, who is 14 and in 8th grade in public school, told me that one of her teachers spent about 20 minutes today dogging homeschooling because two kids said that they wanted to be homeschooled because they didn't get into the high schools they wanted.

Apparently, "homeschooling doesn't work" because homeschooled kids don't learn "everything they need to know." If they ever chose to come back to school, they would be behind because they would have "missed a lot of stuff." Additionally, parents are not qualified to homeschool because we "don't have the appropriate degree." Oh, and of course, you're "very lonely" when you homeschool.

My dd said, "Well, I was homeschooled. My brother and sister are homeschooled."

At which point the teacher said, "Well, your brother and sister will be fine because your mom is very smart, but homeschooling usually doesn't work."


I told my dd to tell this teacher that I just attended a homeschool conference with thousands of families who would prove him wrong.

As an aside, I get really tired of the school employees discussing things with my dd's class that they have no business discussing. My dd doesn't need to know her math teacher's opinion on abortion and condoms, her social studies teacher's opinion on whether god exists, or her enrichment teacher's opinions on why homeschooling doesn't work. *sigh*

Tara


The teacher does not really believe that homeschool doesn't work. The teacher was trying to discourage students from wanting to leave the public school system for homeschool.

Exhibit A

My dd said, "Well, I was homeschooled. My brother and sister are homeschooled."


[The teaching trying to clean it up.]

At which point the teacher said, "Well, your brother and sister will be fine because your mom is very smart, but homeschooling usually doesn't work."




Posted Image

Edited by LUV2EDU, 21 April 2009 - 09:32 PM.


#11 Maria/ME

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 09:45 PM

Gee, 2 million people can't be all wrong can they??

#12 Tree House Academy

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 10:38 PM

Oh...I see. You just have to be "really smart." Of course, being able and willing to read and learn an DO has nothing to do with homeschooling. Oh, and I definitely need to go get my degree in how to control a classroom of kids so I can teach my two at home.

Open mouth, insert foot.

#13 training5

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 10:52 PM

So the first 5 years at home we didn't teach our kids the 'stuff' they needed to know? YEEEAAAHHH>

#14 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 11:15 PM

The majority of the public school teachers experience homeschooling by watching parents get angry at the schools, pull their kids out for a year, and then plop them back in a year later--and the kids are a whole year further behind in school. Often this is the family that has discipline problems, and the teachers are not sad to see them go...but they do not want to pick up the pieces when they return.

So....I have sympathy on the teachers as far as this goes.

If we want to take the responsibility on our shoulders to show them the other side of homeschooling, we can. It is an up-hill battle, but it can be very, very good.

Some of my best supporters are teachers. Many of them I've had great discussions with--I tell them about the parents I worked with in ps who, when told their child was flunking science, said, "Ha, ha, ha! They got my genes!" I point out that those children do not get more out of school than their parents expect of them. I point out that the number of homeschooled kids that I've encountered that are getting a "raw deal" by being homeschooled is very, very small...but the number of kids in the public schools who are not going to make it because of the system is not all so very small. As someone who use to teach in that school system, I represent someone who is qualified in their eyes...but I go to bat for all the other parents who do not fit their idea of "qualified." I tell them that the parent who is most likely to succeed is not the well-educated, college grad with an education degree. It is the parent who desires to do their best. Even in high school, there are so many good materials out there, everyone can get what is needed to teach a quality curriculum.

Their ignorance of the homeschool movement often comes from real experiences. We just need to let them know that what they are seeing is the worst side of homeschooling. We can point out to them that we will not assume that all of the public schools are made of the worst teachers, worst students, worst everything, and they should not assume that the homeschool movement is made up of only the worst of society who is incapable of doing good things for their children.

Ha! That felt good. :lol: Sometimes one just needs to get some thoughts down in "ink". LOL!

Jean

Edited by Jean in Wisc, 22 April 2009 - 07:22 AM.


#15 kellycbr

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Posted 22 April 2009 - 12:40 AM

The majority of the public school teachers experience homeschooling by watching parents get angry at the schools, pull their kids out for a year, and then plop them back in a year later--and the kids are a whole year further behind in school. Often this is the family that has discipline problems, and the teachers are not sad to see them go...but they do not want to pick up the pieces when they return.

So....I have sympathy on the teachers as far as this goes.

If we want to take the responsibility on our shoulders to show them the other side of homeschooling, we can. It is an up-hill battle, but it can be very, very good.

Some of my best supporters are teachers. Many of them I've had great discussions with--I tell them about the parents I worked with in ps who, when told their child was flunking science, said, "Ha, ha, ha! They got my genes!" I point out that those children do not get more out of school than their parents expect of them. I point out that the number of homeschooled kids that I've encountered that are getting a "raw deal" by being homeschooled is very, very small...but the number of kids in the public schools who are not going to make it because of the system is not all so very small. As someone who use to teach in that school system, I represent someone who is qualified in their eyes...but I go to bat for all the other parents who do not fit their idea of "qualified." I tell them that the parent who is most likely to succeed is not the well-educated, college grad with an education degree. It is the parent who desires to do their best. Even in high school, there are so many good materials out there, everyone can get what they need to teach a quality curriculum.

Their ignorance of the homeschool movement often comes from real experiences. We just need to let them know that what they are seeing is the worst side of homeschooling. We can point out to them that we will not assume that all of the public schools are made of the worst teachers, worst students, worst everything, and they should not assume that the homeschool movement is made up of only the worst of society who is incapable of doing good things for their children.

Ha! That felt good. :lol: Sometimes one just needs to get some thoughts down in "ink". LOL!

Jean



:iagree:Wonderful post. I've had wonderful support from our local ps teachers. When my son became bored, and the fire was going out in thim (in 1st grade!), we all worked together. When it still wasn't happening, his lovely teacher told me "off the record, he's an excellent homeschool canidate. My daughter is just like him. He needs one-on-one, and he needs you. He's going to really excel later." As I groaned at her, she nodded her head and told me I could do it. She was right. I think educators are coming around to seeing homeschooling as just another choice in educating our kids. And sometimes its the best choice.;)

Kelly


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