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Alternatives to explode the code for dyslexic 7yro


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#1 home4fun

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:01 PM

My son is dyslexic. We have been using the Davis program and he has come a long ways. We have used explode the code for awhile, but I am realizing that he is good at guessing and not sure it is really helping or really my goal in using it. My only goal was getting him to write a little each day without complaining, which has worked. He can't spell yet!, and does not do any other writing. Now that his reading is coming along slowly, I would like to try to add some more writing, but not sure where to go from here. More explode the code books or what other suggestions would you all have?

Thanks

Angie (home4fun)

#2 LizzyBee

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:16 PM

My 7 yo dyslexic dd enjoys ETC, but it's not helping her learn to read. After tons of research, we are going to use Barton Reading and Spelling. However, dd is not yet ready to start it due to her lack of phonemic awareness. We are using Lindamood Bell Phonemic Sequencing (LiPS) to remediate that, but as soon as she can solidly pass the Barton student screening test, we are changing programs.

There are several reasons I chose Barton:
I've never read a bad review of it.
It comes with all of the necessary training on DVD included in the price.
It is largely open and go, which I need because I work outside the home.
It goes through a 9th grade reading level, so I won't be stuck in a year or two trying to figure out what to use next.
The author offers free support by phone or email.

#3 starwarsmomma

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:37 PM

My 7/8 (now 9) year old loved ETC and their BEYOND the Code series alot!

Another possibility is the book Phonics Pathways and / or Reading Pathways. Those helped my son alot! (and cheap!) (amazon.com)

#4 LizzyBee

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:09 PM

My 7/8 (now 9) year old loved ETC and their BEYOND the Code series alot!

Another possibility is the book Phonics Pathways and / or Reading Pathways. Those helped my son alot! (and cheap!) (amazon.com)


Is your child dyslexic? I'm just asking because Phonics Pathways was a disaster with my dyslexic child. If your child is dyslexic and it worked, that's great. :)

#5 starwarsmomma

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:11 PM

yes, he's dyslexic. :D
(diagnosed at public school and scottish rite hospital)

#6 Ottakee

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 08:06 PM

I really like Apples and Pears for spelling/writing for this age/stage. It is very effective for dyslexic students. It IS more expensive than other programs but well worth the cost.

http://www.promethea...ationsbooks.htm If you scroll down you can see the Apples and Pears program. Click the "see inside" to see the entire program.

#7 ElizabethB

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 08:10 PM

Not sure if it will help or not, but you can try my concentration game, it makes both real and nonsense words--I've found nonsense words very helpful for my remedial students. Most of them have symptoms of dyslexia caused by sight words. A few may have actual organic dyslexia as well, but it's hard to tell, they were all exposed to sight words.

http://www.thephonic...trationgam.html

#8 Michele in NC

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 11:42 PM

Not sure if it will help or not, but you can try my concentration game, it makes both real and nonsense words--I've found nonsense words very helpful for my remedial students. Most of them have symptoms of dyslexia caused by sight words. A few may have actual organic dyslexia as well, but it's hard to tell, they were all exposed to sight words.

http://www.thephonic...trationgam.html


Elizabeth,

I've been playing the phonics concentration game with my boys. If one of them pronounces the word incorrectly, should I have them sound it out? Or should I tell them the word? It seems to be a little confusing for them. Today, one of them picked "S" and "ON". Since we're working on "phonics", I assumed it would have a short 'o' sound in the middle, rhyming with "Don". However, it's actually son, as in the son of God. Which way should they pronounce it?

Thanks for your help. I ordered the Back on the Right Track program yesterday. I'll let you know how it goes.

Michele

#9 ElizabethB

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Posted 27 March 2009 - 12:47 AM

Elizabeth,

I've been playing the phonics concentration game with my boys. If one of them pronounces the word incorrectly, should I have them sound it out? Or should I tell them the word? It seems to be a little confusing for them. Today, one of them picked "S" and "ON". Since we're working on "phonics", I assumed it would have a short 'o' sound in the middle, rhyming with "Don". However, it's actually son, as in the son of God. Which way should they pronounce it?

Thanks for your help. I ordered the Back on the Right Track program yesterday. I'll let you know how it goes.

Michele


I would have them pronounce it as "sun," but explain that phonetically, it should rhyme with Don but is an exception. If they pronounce a word incorrectly, I'd have them sound it out. In fact, for my remedial students, for the first few days or weeks when they play it, I don't give points unless the word is sounded out before they pronounce it! (They must say /k/ /a/ /t/ cat for the word cat to receive 2 points, and /m/ /i/ /p/ mip for the nonsense word mip to receive 1 point.) Once they stop guessing as much, I drop the requirement to sound it out every time and just have them sound out the ones they miss.

#10 HeidiD

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 12:47 PM

Here are a couple of books which provide gentle yet structured writing practice: "100% Writing Lite", published by Linguisystems, and "Models for Writing", published by Academic Therapy Publications. I've also found some really helpful support materials for spelling and writing at the Teacher Created Resources website (eg. Dr. Fry's Homophones Workbook).

#11 home4fun

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Posted 28 March 2009 - 01:20 PM

Here are a couple of books which provide gentle yet structured writing practice: "100% Writing Lite", published by Linguisystems, and "Models for Writing", published by Academic Therapy Publications. I've also found some really helpful support materials for spelling and writing at the Teacher Created Resources website (eg. Dr. Fry's Homophones Workbook).



I think that was more what I was asking (though I was not clear)..what are good writing programs to begin with for dyslexic kids...

I will look into it.

Angie (home4fun)

#12 irishindian

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 10:56 PM

My son "slipped through the cracks" at a parochial school and I am now homeschooling him. He is now 11 - 5th grade, and can not read well. He has been recently diagnosed with Central Auditory Processing disorder, Irlen Syndrome, a working memory deficit, and who knows what else will come along as we try to recover from this. I suspect that dislexia play a part of his issues. All of the programs that help with phonemic awareness and such are very immature/childish (in his opinion) and he feels as though he is being made fun of for not knowing how to read or remember things.

My question is this: Has anyone worked with an older child that needs to do some really quick making up? What materials can you recommend? His confidence is as low as can be and he doesn't have any motivation.

He is using the working memory deficit as an excuse. I could use some ideas, support, reference to materials/curriculum and so on.

Thanks for any ideas!

#13 Ottakee

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 07:44 AM

How well can he read? Has he just memorized the words or can he decode nonsense words and words he has not learned before?

http://www.teacherwe...to/printap2.stm is a place to get the I See Sam books sets 1 and 2 for free download. Now these ARE going to look childish and might be below him (test him on the last one and see if he can read it fluently) but you might explain that these are more like comic/cartoon books and WILL help him learn to read.

I think that finding a program that really works will help him, esp. if you can do it at home where no one else sees his reading material. He could go through this program quickly and then really be able to move on to grade level reading material and non fiction, etc.

My 13dd is on the 6th set of these books now and can read a great deal--chapter books, lots of non fiction, etc.

http://www.piperbooks.co.uk/index.htm here is the link for the upper sets of books to see samples and then order them--you will need to US link to order them.

#14 LizzyBee

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 09:38 AM

My son "slipped through the cracks" at a parochial school and I am now homeschooling him. He is now 11 - 5th grade, and can not read well. He has been recently diagnosed with Central Auditory Processing disorder, Irlen Syndrome, a working memory deficit, and who knows what else will come along as we try to recover from this. I suspect that dislexia play a part of his issues. All of the programs that help with phonemic awareness and such are very immature/childish (in his opinion) and he feels as though he is being made fun of for not knowing how to read or remember things.

My question is this: Has anyone worked with an older child that needs to do some really quick making up? What materials can you recommend? His confidence is as low as can be and he doesn't have any motivation.

He is using the working memory deficit as an excuse. I could use some ideas, support, reference to materials/curriculum and so on.

Thanks for any ideas!


You might look at Literacy Leaders at www.epsbooks.com. You can download the first chapter free and try it out before you buy.


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