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Spanish needed - 2 years. Is Rosetta Stone sufficient for high school credit?


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#1 Frontier Mom

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 02:11 PM

I have a rising 9th grader and we will continue Latin. However, i want him to do 2 years of Spanish as well and wonder if Rosetta Stone will fit the bill. I like that it is computerized and pretty independent for him.

Also, which program do I need?

#2 Frontier Mom

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:49 AM

bumping because I need some suggestions for high school foreign language in addition to Latin.

#3 mchel210

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 01:03 PM

I believe Rosetta Stone's site states one year of their spanish is equal to 2 credits.

#4 Laurie4b

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 04:58 PM

Personally, I don't feel that Rosettastone is a complete program for high school Spanish. However, I think if you supplement with the following, you'd have nice Spanish I and II programs:

Spanish I: Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish
Spanish II: Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, PMP Pronouns and Prepositions, and some type of Spanish reader, like Easy Spanish Reader.

#5 Frontier Mom

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 05:00 PM

Personally, I don't feel that Rosettastone is a complete program for high school Spanish. However, I think if you supplement with the following, you'd have nice Spanish I and II programs:

Spanish I: Madrigal's Magic Key to Spanish
Spanish II: Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, PMP Pronouns and Prepositions, and some type of Spanish reader, like Easy Spanish Reader.


Thanks!!

#6 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 05:48 PM

I don't think Rosetta Stone does enough on its own.

My undergrad major was Spanish, and I've really liked Alpha Omega's Switched on Schoolhouse Spanish I and Spanish II (not the Elementary/Secondary Spanish). My dd did less than 1.5 years of their Spanish and was planning to finish the 2nd year during the summer when she found out she was required to take a college placement test in June (gulp). She tested out of the equivalent of 3 years of high school Spanish...so I told her she could quit studying! She decided to take 3rd semester Spanish even though she could have taken 4th semester, and she told me that she did not learn any new grammar in the class!

The program is aggressive. The amount of vocabulary is insane. I let my kids do the quizzes and tests open notebook--if they wrote it into their notebooks, they could use it on the tests. There is so much exercise and review that this worked well for them. They've obviously retained enough to get into college level classes doing it this way. I told my son that if he did all of Spanish I and II plus read a small book (maybe just a book of the Bible) with a short paper, I'd give him 3 high school credits. To be truthful with you, that much work might get a child to test out of 4 years in a college placement exam--or more.

My oldest did the program on her own--she was ready to be done with mommy-teacher. My 2nd child has benefited from my knowing the language and helping him. My 1st child had more Latin, too, so that may be why it came more easily--she said it was simple next to Latin.

So there ya go--another computer-based Spanish program option :)

Jean

P.S. And it is a lot cheaper than RS :)

Edited by Jean in Wisc, 05 February 2009 - 08:36 PM.


#7 Frontier Mom

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 12:28 PM

I don't think Rosetta Stone does enough on its own.

My undergrad major was Spanish, and I've really liked Alpha Omega's Switched on Schoolhouse Spanish I and Spanish II (not the Elementary/Secondary Spanish). My dd did less than 1.5 years of their Spanish and was planning to finish the 2nd year during the summer when she found out she was required to take a college placement test in June (gulp). She tested out of the equivalent of 3 years of high school Spanish...so I told her she could quit studying! She decided to take 3rd semester Spanish even though she could have taken 4th semester, and she told me that she did not learn any new grammar in the class!

The program is aggressive. The amount of vocabulary is insane. I let my kids do the quizzes and tests open notebook--if they wrote it into their notebooks, they could use it on the tests. There is so much exercise and review that this worked well for them. They've obviously retained enough to get into college level classes doing it this way. I told my son that if he did all of Spanish I and II plus read a small book (maybe just a book of the Bible) with a short paper, I'd give him 3 high school credits. To be truthful with you, that much work might get a child to test out of 4 years in a college placement exam--or more.

My oldest did the program on her own--she was ready to be done with mommy-teacher. My 2nd child has benefited from my knowing the language and helping him. My 1st child had more Latin, too, so that may be why it came more easily--she said it was simple next to Latin.

So there ya go--another computer-based Spanish program option :)

Jean

P.S. And it is a lot cheaper than RS :)


Thanks for the advice. This would be a great option and I sounds like it is adequate enough. Just what I needed.

#8 choirfarm

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 08:04 AM

Could I use this with my 7th grader and my 9th grader at the same time? Could I somehow program it so that my 7th grader could take a much slower pace??

Christine

I don't think Rosetta Stone does enough on its own.

My undergrad major was Spanish, and I've really liked Alpha Omega's Switched on Schoolhouse Spanish I and Spanish II (not the Elementary/Secondary Spanish). My dd did less than 1.5 years of their Spanish and was planning to finish the 2nd year during the summer when she found out she was required to take a college placement test in June (gulp). She tested out of the equivalent of 3 years of high school Spanish...so I told her she could quit studying! She decided to take 3rd semester Spanish even though she could have taken 4th semester, and she told me that she did not learn any new grammar in the class!

The program is aggressive. The amount of vocabulary is insane. I let my kids do the quizzes and tests open notebook--if they wrote it into their notebooks, they could use it on the tests. There is so much exercise and review that this worked well for them. They've obviously retained enough to get into college level classes doing it this way. I told my son that if he did all of Spanish I and II plus read a small book (maybe just a book of the Bible) with a short paper, I'd give him 3 high school credits. To be truthful with you, that much work might get a child to test out of 4 years in a college placement exam--or more.

My oldest did the program on her own--she was ready to be done with mommy-teacher. My 2nd child has benefited from my knowing the language and helping him. My 1st child had more Latin, too, so that may be why it came more easily--she said it was simple next to Latin.

So there ya go--another computer-based Spanish program option :)

Jean

P.S. And it is a lot cheaper than RS :)



#9 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:50 AM

Could I use this with my 7th grader and my 9th grader at the same time? Could I somehow program it so that my 7th grader could take a much slower pace??

Christine


Yes, you can use it with several students at the same time, and you can vary the assignments. First you need to go into the program and set the "terms". You can have one term run, for example, from Sept. 1st to June 1st. You can have another term run from Sept. 1st to Sept. 1st...or whatever you want; then you add the days off, holidays, etc to that term. You assign the right term to the child and then have the computer fill in the assignments accordingly. OR you can simply assign the work without the terms--just a list of the assignments that you do when you want to do them.

x/. (Okay. That was a message from my cat.)

I have it set up so that if the kids get behind, it marks it with a red exclamation point, but nothing else happens--so they just keep plugging along at their own speed.

HTH,
Jean

Edited by Jean in Wisc, 08 February 2009 - 09:58 AM.


#10 Storm Bay

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 04:39 PM

My dd will do Rosetta Stone German level II (the older version, not the newest one) along with a separate grammar for at least one German high school credit. She's doing Level I now.

#11 LanaTron

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 12:53 AM

My undergrad major was Spanish, and I've really liked Alpha Omega's Switched on Schoolhouse Spanish I and Spanish II (not the Elementary/Secondary Spanish).


I understand that Elementary Spanish is intended for grades 3-6, but I want to know if a child studied Elementary and Secondary Spanish, would it be equivalent to Spanish I? or Spanish II?

Thanks.

#12 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 06:02 AM

I understand that Elementary Spanish is intended for grades 3-6, but I want to know if a child studied Elementary and Secondary Spanish, would it be equivalent to Spanish I? or Spanish II?

Thanks.


My understanding is that Elementary/Secondary is based upon Power Glide Spanish. I have Power Glide in book form and, in my opinion, it is not worth the money. It is a program that has the child figure out the grammar rather than teach it. The story that flows throughout the book really doesn't help teach the language--I can't remember the ending, but I do remember thinking, "So why did they do that? It does not help in Spanish learning at all!!!" Many of the assignments are there for the child to see the pattern and figure out what the meaning is--without teaching the patterns. Well...I could go on and on, but IF this is Power Glide on the computer, I could not see how a child would be able to test out of college level Spanish by doing it. Perhaps it would be something a child could do as a fun activity if it interested her. Perhaps they see it as an introduction to the language that can be used prior to truly studying and learning it.

Younger children can learn a language as a native. As they mature, the elasticity in the brain no longer allows them to learn a language in the same way. Immersion is great for a younger child, but most people lose their abilities to learn a language through immersion around puberty. I don't know if this is the idea behind Power Glide, but they are big on "whole to parts" rather than "parts to whole" (i.e. teach phrases and sentences and let the child figure out the grammar rather than teaching the grammar and then using what they know to make sentences).Teaching a language by giving a person a lot of exercises that make them "sleuth" out the meanings is only going to work with a small percentage of the population--maybe it is for those who love putting together the pieces of the puzzle to get the "a ha!" at the end of the game. I could not figure out how a person would walk away with any real knowledge of the language through this program--more of an introduction prior to a deeper study. (But then I only worked through book 1--maybe book 2 goes deeper into the grammar?? I assume the Secondary would be book 2????)

I must say, however, that in all of the people I've met who have used PG, I did find one person who thought it was a good program. I did not question how much language she thought she learned, but she was satisfied with it....but I've only met one person who had that opinion.

I wonder if a person who has grown up with the language around them (Texas/Calif?) would be able to do better with this program. Anyone have feedback on that? Or maybe there are people here who have used it and can give some positive feedback? Perhaps there are people who found PG to be what they wanted for a language program--certainly SOS Spanish I and II are not for everyone since it is an extremely aggressive program. Maybe it fits the needs for some people (especially if they never plan to use Spanish but just want some Spanish credit, which may be the case with most high schoolers).

??

FWIW,
Jean

Edited by Jean in Wisc, 09 February 2009 - 06:06 AM.


#13 choirfarm

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 06:40 AM

When I looked at AO's site, I see SOS Secondary Spanish, SOS Spanish I and then SOS Spanish II. What is the difference between Secondary Spanish and Spanish I??
Christine

#14 LanaTron

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 02:48 PM

Really, I am interested in the French, but I saw that SOS does not have French I/II like they have for Spanish, which was why I was asking about the comparison of the two SOS Spanish programs.

My ds13 is using Learnables French level 2 right now, and may very likely finish Level 3 by the end of the year. I am trying to get a head start on what to do with him next year, and hoping to find a language program that will be comprehensive enough for a high school credit. But from what you've said about the Spanish Intermediate, I would guess that the French Intermediate would be about the same, and not worth a high school credit.

It is good to know about SOS I/II, though, as he will most likely study Spanish in high school as well.

#15 dopeyfav

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 11:18 AM

Jean,

My DS is going to need 4 years of Spanish for the college he wants to attend. I am interested in the Alpha Omega you recommended; can you please tell me this is practical for someone if no one in the family speaks Spanish? You mentioned giving 3 credits to you ds, do you have any recommendations for the 4th credit?

Thanks,
Rhonda

#16 asta

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 01:17 PM

As someone with 4 years of high school French and a minor in French from University (as well as having lived in Belgium for 2 1/2 years)...

Teach your kids Spanish.

Seriously.

There is SO not a need to learn French if you live in the United States. And with a good command of Spanish, you can bumble through France, Belgium, and Italy.

French simply isn't the universal language it once was: English and Spanish are.


asta

(whose child is re-learning German, his first language)

#17 LanaTron

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 01:44 PM

As someone with 4 years of high school French and a minor in French from University (as well as having lived in Belgium for 2 1/2 years)...

Teach your kids Spanish.

Seriously.

There is SO not a need to learn French if you live in the United States. And with a good command of Spanish, you can bumble through France, Belgium, and Italy.

French simply isn't the universal language it once was: English and Spanish are.


asta

(whose child is re-learning German, his first language)


My dc chose French, not I. I have studied Spanish, Russian, and German, and I was hoping they would choose one of those, seeing as I find French pronunciation difficult. This is one of the few things I have allowed them to have a choice over.

I know French isn't "universal," and, living in Texas, I know firsthand that Spanish is infinitely more practical, but I still think that French has a lot of value. Actually I think that studying any foreign language has much value on many different levels.

And, FWIW, my dc will also do at least two years of Spanish in high school, hopefully along side French.

#18 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 03:08 PM

Jean,

My DS is going to need 4 years of Spanish for the college he wants to attend. I am interested in the Alpha Omega you recommended; can you please tell me this is practical for someone if no one in the family speaks Spanish? You mentioned giving 3 credits to you ds, do you have any recommendations for the 4th credit?

Thanks,
Rhonda


My daughter went through SOS Spanish by herself. My son is sitting beside me making all sorts of frustrating and hilarious sounds while he is trying to get through his assignment--he would not make it without me. Has your son had other languages? Do they come easily to him? My dd learned her Latin easily buy my son struggled. So...it depends on the child.

If I were to do a 4th year, I'd have my child listen to the Dish TV Spanish programs(broadcasted on channel 9411 for schools that do not have a Spanish teacher)--I'd tape them and have him go over the chapters in Paso a Paso (the textbook they use) and then listen to the discussions on the program--they are wonderful! Then I'd have the child read a book or two, study the history of the Spanish countries and write a paper about what they have read.

Something like that would turn into the 4th year--practice in hearing the language, reading, and writing.

I would think there are other options for the Dish TV, I just really like that program!

Jean

#19 Colleen in NS

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 03:26 PM

My daughter went through SOS Spanish by herself. My son is sitting beside me making all sorts of frustrating and hilarious sounds while he is trying to get through his assignment--he would not make it without me. Has your son had other languages? Do they come easily to him? My dd learned her Latin easily buy my son struggled. So...it depends on the child.

If I were to do a 4th year, I'd have my child listen to the Dish TV Spanish programs(broadcasted on channel 9411 for schools that do not have a Spanish teacher)--I'd tape them and have him go over the chapters in Paso a Paso (the textbook they use) and then listen to the discussions on the program--they are wonderful! Then I'd have the child read a book or two, study the history of the Spanish countries and write a paper about what they have read.

Something like that would turn into the 4th year--practice in hearing the language, reading, and writing.

I would think there are other options for the Dish TV, I just really like that program!

Jean


Jean,

Your posts on Spanish have been very helpful to me in the past and I have them filed in my folder here. You helped me to understand what all is involved in learning a foreign language (besides the immersion factor). I've wondered sometimes what one could do (besides a university class) for a 3rd and 4th year high school class, and this thread helps me understand that. Thank you for sharing again!

#20 tajott

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 11:14 AM

Hi Jean,

I hadn't thought about SOS in my search for something besides RS. Thanks for the recommendation.

Teresa

aka Andy's mom (from Tri-State HS Group)

#21 tajott

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 11:20 AM

Hi Jean,

I hadn't thought about SOS in my search for something besides RS. Thanks for the recommendation.

Teresa

aka Andy's mom (from Tri-State HS Group)


back to the free livemocha.com and other stuff

#22 dopeyfav

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 11:49 AM

Jean,
My son took a Spanish class a few years ago & did well. It is the only foreign language experience he has, so at 13, I am not sure. He usually picks up new things quickly. I am wondering about a tutor to accompany the SOS, any thoughts?

If we decide to use SOS, what would we need to purchase for the 1st year? Looking at their website, I was a little confused.

Thank you for the 4th year ideas, I will look into a Spanish channel for DirecTV. Maybe someone out there already knows of one.........

Edited by dopeyfav, 11 February 2009 - 11:50 AM.
incorrect quote


#23 Guest_Katia_*

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 02:20 PM

Really, I am interested in the French, but I saw that SOS does not have French I/II like they have for Spanish, which was why I was asking about the comparison of the two SOS Spanish programs.

My ds13 is using Learnables French level 2 right now, and may very likely finish Level 3 by the end of the year. I am trying to get a head start on what to do with him next year, and hoping to find a language program that will be comprehensive enough for a high school credit. But from what you've said about the Spanish Intermediate, I would guess that the French Intermediate would be about the same, and not worth a high school credit.

It is good to know about SOS I/II, though, as he will most likely study Spanish in high school as well.


My dd loves French as well. She used Learnables levels 1-4 along with Barron's French the Easy Way workbook for grammar. (it's not 'easy' btw, but it was understandable and fun). We used this for 9th grade and 10th grade high school French 1 and 2.

For high school French 3 and 4, she used French in Action with all of the available components (CDs, online videos, workbooks, textbook, self-study guide). Since it is a college level program, level 1 was French 3 and level 2 was French 4. She said having done all of the Learnables levels and the French the Easy Way book really helped her with the French in Action.

When she did her college placement test, she tested out of her first 3 semesters of COLLEGE French, and the French professor said her accent was excellent.

I can't say enough good things about French in Action based on dd's experience with it. Oh, and she did it all self-study. I don't know any French at all and she never had a tutor.

The videos are available online free at Annenberg and you can read all about the texts and other components of the program at Oxford University Press.

#24 Annabelle's Mom

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 10:44 PM

I'm stepping into this conversation late, but I have some questions for you experts. My dd wants to learn to converse in Spanish (so would I but I think I'm too old to grasp it now). We tried briefly this fall to learn with a small homeschool group taught by lady for whom Spanish is her native language along with English (she's from the Mormon colonies in Mexico, so is basically bilingual). Anyway, various family conflicts ended those lessons. I've been trying to use Speedy Spanish, but not feeling very effective with it. We can do the exercises, but it does not seem to be leading toward actually conversing with real people. I have an entire set of college texts with tapes, etc. from several years ago, but again this seems more like classroom stuff and not leading toward conversation. I have the older Rosetta Stone program, but not the Spanish set. I'm not certain if their Spanish version would work with the older program materials, and I'm somewhat reluctant to shell out for the entire program again, and also not certain whether it would get us where we want to be. I am not looking for a credit course. She/we just want to learn to converse in Spanish, as we have a very large Hispanic population, and we'd like to communicate. I see all kinds of CD courses in Barnes and Noble, but don't have a clue what would be best. Any thoughts for me?

Linda

#25 LanaTron

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 01:52 AM

Thank you so much, Katia. That is very helpful!

#26 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 07:55 AM

When I looked at AO's site, I see SOS Secondary Spanish, SOS Spanish I and then SOS Spanish II. What is the difference between Secondary Spanish and Spanish I??
Christine


Did you see my note above?

#27 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 08:04 AM

I'm stepping into this conversation late, but I have some questions for you experts. My dd wants to learn to converse in Spanish (so would I but I think I'm too old to grasp it now). We tried briefly this fall to learn with a small homeschool group taught by lady for whom Spanish is her native language along with English (she's from the Mormon colonies in Mexico, so is basically bilingual). Anyway, various family conflicts ended those lessons. I've been trying to use Speedy Spanish, but not feeling very effective with it. We can do the exercises, but it does not seem to be leading toward actually conversing with real people. I have an entire set of college texts with tapes, etc. from several years ago, but again this seems more like classroom stuff and not leading toward conversation. I have the older Rosetta Stone program, but not the Spanish set. I'm not certain if their Spanish version would work with the older program materials, and I'm somewhat reluctant to shell out for the entire program again, and also not certain whether it would get us where we want to be. I am not looking for a credit course. She/we just want to learn to converse in Spanish, as we have a very large Hispanic population, and we'd like to communicate. I see all kinds of CD courses in Barnes and Noble, but don't have a clue what would be best. Any thoughts for me?

Linda


It has been years since I've used my Spanish--we don't exactly live anywhere near a Spanish speaking community, although I notice more and more people using it in WalMart.

But my approach to this is two-fold. (1) Study the language--classroom format. You learn vocabulary, grammar, basic usage. (2)Then you add in a verbal format--sometimes I check out the CD's from the library and just listen to them. I don't know which one's I've used, but there are always a couple of those CD's that you can buy at Borders. I keep them in the car and listen to them. I also turn on Spanish TV, and I love Dish's classroom teacher on Channel 9411 (NAUS, I think)--he teaches the kids in schools that do not have a Spanish class. The children's programs are what I am best at understanding. LOL!

If you do both, you can creatively communicate, not just spit out memorized lines. But those memorized lines get you a LONG way when you are just learning a language! Together, they can make you functional in the language, even if you are not fluent.

Jean

#28 cathmom

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 11:29 AM

Younger children can learn a language as a native. As they mature, the elasticity in the brain no longer allows them to learn a language in the same way. Immersion is great for a younger child, but most people lose their abilities to learn a language through immersion around puberty.

FWIW,
Jean


This is called the Critical Period Hypothesis and has never been proved. Children who learn another language often do not have accents, but studies have shown that adults actually can learn language faster.

#29 Jean in Wisc

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 01:43 PM

This is called the Critical Period Hypothesis and has never been proved. Children who learn another language often do not have accents, but studies have shown that adults actually can learn language faster.


No doubt the stuff I learned in grad school is outdated :D, but I still believe that when an adult learns a language, he does better with a formal study + immersion rather than simply immersion (as a child learns it). It is just my observation when I taught English as a 2nd language that adults tossed into total immersion sank and did not swim. FWIW.

Jean

#30 cathmom

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 07:16 PM

No doubt the stuff I learned in grad school is outdated :D, but I still believe that when an adult learns a language, he does better with a formal study + immersion rather than simply immersion (as a child learns it). It is just my observation when I taught English as a 2nd language that adults tossed into total immersion sank and did not swim. FWIW.

Jean


Right, I wasn't clear. Adults studying a language can learn faster than children in an immersion environment. They just won't have native sounding accents!

#31 Joan in GE

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 10:35 AM

My understanding is that Elementary/Secondary is based upon Power Glide Spanish. I have Power Glide in book form and, in my opinion, it is not worth the money.

I wonder if a person who has grown up with the language around them (Texas/Calif?) would be able to do better with this program. Anyone have feedback on that? Or maybe there are people here who have used it and can give some positive feedback?
Jean


Since we live in a French speaking area and have the French PG (but nothing computer based) I thought I would comment that I think it is fairly useless. The children listened to it just for more exposure but I would never recommend it. Even the French accent was not what we hear over here, Americanized or something.

By the way, about the brain plasticity times...I heard from the author of Raising Multilingual Children that the windows were 0-2 yo, 4-8 yo, the teen years, then I forget but it seemed like elderly or something. Some of the reasons were developmentally related like self-consciousness or something at 8 and I forget the other reasons. I think the teens had the advantage of understanding their own language better and being able to compare. But I have to say that the it is common for teens here to go to the US or the UK to learn English for a year in US high schools and they come back speaking quite well, frequently with no or very little accent.

Having watched foreign children go through the school system here and learn French, people forget the enormous number of hours that they are spending "immersed". If any adult spent that many hours a week learning a language (OK many, not all) they would have learned much, much more than a child has learned after one year.

Jean in Wisc and others, you should post on the bilingual board. It sounds like you have lots of experience and ideas.


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