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Anyone done AoPS Intermediate Alg on Your Own??


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#1 bibsandmegs

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 10:47 AM

I'm wondering if anyone has done this on their own, as opposed to taking a class, that would be willing to share how they did it. What I mean by that is, are you just really mathy so you taught it on your own? Did you use Khan Academy or other videos? Or is there some other resource that you used?

We are considering using this. I'm not very mathy, but my husband is extremely mathy!! The problem is, I'm the one who is home, and my husband's time at home is really limited. It would be difficult for him to teach this class in a way that would benefit the kids (there are 2 that would take it).

I would consider an online class. However, we are on the east coast, that puts the class at 7:30 to 9:00pm. My kids have checked out by then. They get up really early (5:15am) for an early morning religion class so I really don't think I can do that to them.

We may have to go with another alternative that has videos, but I'd love to hear any experiences with AoPS Int. Algebra if there are any out there.

Thank you so much!!

-Lisa

#2 regentrude

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 10:51 AM

Yes, twice. We have done all AoPS courses on our own, intro to algebra through calculus. this allowed out kids to work at their pace.

 

You don't "teach" the class - the textbook is written TO the student to be used without an instructor. this is why some people consider the books "wordy": the book says every word a good teacher would say in class.


Edited by regentrude, 12 February 2018 - 10:52 AM.

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#3 snowbeltmom

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 10:54 AM

Have you used any of the other AoPS books? The books have excellent example problems that walk the student through the concept. I used the books without the online class component with two of my kids. I am "mathy", but I think the outcome would have been just as good if I were not because the explanations in the book are really good.

ETA: Cross-posted with Regentrude

Edited by snowbeltmom, 12 February 2018 - 10:55 AM.


#4 igbu

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:20 PM

We r also on the east coast and soccer and Bball coaches are not happy when both our DSs miss due to a class. We have one in Alg B and the other in Intro C&P. The boys will use KA or another outside source to help at times, but the AoPS community and message boards are tremendous. This spring’s Alg B class has a TA available every weekday non-class evening from 7:30-8:30 specifically to answer class related questions, it’s a great help.

#5 Julie of KY

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:39 PM

I "taught" the AoPS Intermediate Algebra to my son. He is more mathy than me, though I am good. We worked through problems together.

 

We did not use the AoPS boards or any other help other than the solution book.



#6 bibsandmegs

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Posted 12 February 2018 - 12:50 PM

Have you used any of the other AoPS books? The books have excellent example problems that walk the student through the concept. I used the books without the online class component with two of my kids. I am "mathy", but I think the outcome would have been just as good if I were not because the explanations in the book are really good.

ETA: Cross-posted with Regentrude


Thank you for the input.

I have not used the other AoPS books. We've used BA, and I have Intro to Algebra, but haven't used it. These two children did Foerster's Algebra 1 and also Chalkdust Algebra 1 (we really wanted Algebra 1 cemented in).

-Lisa

#7 daijobu

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 11:41 PM

I consider myself to be pretty mathy, and we've been using AoPS at home since prealgebra.  I worked through Intermediate Algebra with one dd and my other dd studied it independently of me.  If I recall, this is the first book in the Intermediate series?  It's a big jump up from the Introduction series.  

 

I have it open on my lap now, and there is a problem from Putnam, HMMT, and... Canada.  (We joked that these countries that were cited were lobbing weapons of math destruction on us.)  I have penciled in to a problem (incidentally not a Putnam or HMMT problem) "I don't understand the solution :-( "

 

There were a lot of problems that I couldn't understand, even with the solution.  But we were mellow about that, though somewhat less mellow about no fewer than 4 chapters about polynomials.  But it's good for you, because polynomials come up a lot on the AMC 12.  (And the Putnam, apparently.)   My dd's are much stronger in polynomials than I am.  

 

If you haven't used AoPS before, why are you switching now?  


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#8 Alice

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 06:51 AM

We haven’t done that book but do use AOPS. We’ve done Pre-Algebra, Intro Algebra, Intro C&P and now are in Geometry. I don’t consider that I teach it at all. It seems designed to be self-taught and I think that’s why it works so well for the right kind of kid (not meaning a kid who is necessarily super smart but one who learns in a particular way). 

 

Ds does it all pretty much on his own. I check his work and then have him go back over problems he missed. If he can’t figure out why, I’ll get out the solutions guide and try and help him. If I can’t, I usually find that if I read him the first sentence or two of the solution he will realize how to do the rest. I then have him read the solutions guide himself to see how they did it. Almost always he figures it out with minimal assistance from me. 

 

I love AOPS and consider myself ok in Math. I did a lot of Math in school, but didn’t love it. I’ve developed more of an appreciation for hard Math doing Singapore and then AOPS with my kids. But I’d find it really hard to have a kid who did AOPS without a class who wasn’t a kid who did well self-teaching. 

 

 

 

 



#9 JoJosMom

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:41 AM

I'm wondering if anyone has done this on their own, as opposed to taking a class, that would be willing to share how they did it. What I mean by that is, are you just really mathy so you taught it on your own? Did you use Khan Academy or other videos? Or is there some other resource that you used?

We are considering using this. I'm not very mathy, but my husband is extremely mathy!! The problem is, I'm the one who is home, and my husband's time at home is really limited. It would be difficult for him to teach this class in a way that would benefit the kids (there are 2 that would take it).

I would consider an online class. However, we are on the east coast, that puts the class at 7:30 to 9:00pm. My kids have checked out by then. They get up really early (5:15am) for an early morning religion class so I really don't think I can do that to them.

We may have to go with another alternative that has videos, but I'd love to hear any experiences with AoPS Int. Algebra if there are any out there.

Thank you so much!!

-Lisa

 

 

Thank you for the input.

I have not used the other AoPS books. We've used BA, and I have Intro to Algebra, but haven't used it. These two children did Foerster's Algebra 1 and also Chalkdust Algebra 1 (we really wanted Algebra 1 cemented in).

-Lisa

 

My DD is taking the class, so I cannot answer your direct question. I do, however, have a question for you: Has your student(s?) already taken Algebra 2 in school or are you considering AoPS Intermediate Algebra for that class? AoPS Intermediate Algebra assumes knowledge of much of the material contained in an introductory    a traditional Algebra II course, as that material is covered in the AoPS introductory book.

 

If you already covered that and I missed it, my apologies. I'm still caffeinating! :001_smile:

 

EDIT to fix my bolded glaring error! Ack! Off to get more coffee!


Edited by JoJosMom, 14 February 2018 - 10:41 AM.

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#10 Roadrunner

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:54 AM

Thank you for the input.

I have not used the other AoPS books. We've used BA, and I have Intro to Algebra, but haven't used it. These two children did Foerster's Algebra 1 and also Chalkdust Algebra 1 (we really wanted Algebra 1 cemented in).

-Lisa

I wouldn’t be jumping from Algebra 1 to Intermediate Algebra. It’s not just a matter of material covered, but also the difficulty of problems. A huge step up from the introductory series. How about Algebra B course or just covering the second half of Intro to Algebra first?

Intermediate Book is written to a student. I am not sure how one would teach it, but certainly a student can work through it herself.

Edited by Roadrunner, 14 February 2018 - 09:55 AM.


#11 Kathy in Richmond

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:59 AM

Thank you for the input.

I have not used the other AoPS books. We've used BA, and I have Intro to Algebra, but haven't used it. These two children did Foerster's Algebra 1 and also Chalkdust Algebra 1 (we really wanted Algebra 1 cemented in).

-Lisa

 

 

My DD is taking the class, so I cannot answer your direct question. I do, however, have a question for you: Has your student(s?) already taken Algebra 2 in school or are you considering AoPS Intermediate Algebra for that class? AoPS Intermediate Algebra assumes knowledge of much of the material contained in an introductory course, as that material is covered in the AoPS introductory book.

 

If you already covered that and I missed it, my apologies. I'm still caffeinating! :001_smile:

 

If your kids have finished algebra 1 in another curriculum, then the starting point in AoPS would be the 2nd have of their Intro to Algebra book or their Algebra B course. Take a look at the pre-tests and post-tests on their website: alg B Are You Ready? alg B Do You Need This?  intermediate alg Are You Ready?

 

Unless you can comfortably work the post-test problems from AoPS algebra B, I wouldn't move on to the Intermediate Algebra book. That text finishes up alg 2 topics and quickly gets into advanced math from precalc and beyond.

 

And I'm laughing with daijobu...When I need a good math challenge, I pull the Intermediate book off my shelf and work some of the problems. Some of them are huge challenges for this math PhD!  :rofl:


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#12 JoJosMom

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:51 AM

If your kids have finished algebra 1 in another curriculum, then the starting point in AoPS would be the 2nd have of their Intro to Algebra book or their Algebra B course. Take a look at the pre-tests and post-tests on their website: alg B Are You Ready? alg B Do You Need This?  intermediate alg Are You Ready?

 

Unless you can comfortably work the post-test problems from AoPS algebra B, I wouldn't move on to the Intermediate Algebra book. That text finishes up alg 2 topics and quickly gets into advanced math from precalc and beyond.

 

And I'm laughing with daijobu...When I need a good math challenge, I pull the Intermediate book off my shelf and work some of the problems. Some of them are huge challenges for this math PhD!  :rofl:

 

Off topic- sorry, OP!

 

Kathy, I find your posts equal parts enlightening and terrifying. Question: How do you think the difficulty level of the classes compare to the level of the books?  The reason I ask is that I am of no use to my child whatsoever in math now. We have relied upon Ruth's brilliant and kind son to provide support in Geometry and Intermediate Algebra, but, since the boy selfishly wants to go off to college next year ( :glare:), I am feeling a bit terrified of the future (hopefully he'll stick around for Intermediate Number Theory, which starts next month :svengo: ). We are heading to our state flagship in a couple of weeks for our first college visit, and I was considered having DD suck up to the math department and beg for a tutor.  Would that be appropriate, insulting, or insufficient? I am nervous, because we had a guy with a Ph.D. in physics try to help her with the Intro to Counting and Probability class and it did not go well. I'm also nervous because our state flagship is not exactly "selective," and if YOU find the Intermediate algebra material challenging, I am honestly a bit afraid that grad students at the school might not be of much help. What do you think?



#13 Kathy in Richmond

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:25 AM

Kathy, I find your posts equal parts enlightening and terrifying. Question: How do you think the difficulty level of the classes compare to the level of the books?  The reason I ask is that I am of no use to my child whatsoever in math now. We have relied upon Ruth's brilliant and kind son to provide support in Geometry and Intermediate Algebra, but, since the boy selfishly wants to go off to college next year ( :glare:), I am feeling a bit terrified of the future (hopefully he'll stick around for Intermediate Number Theory, which starts next month :svengo: ). We are heading to our state flagship in a couple of weeks for our first college visit, and I was considered having DD suck up to the math department and beg for a tutor.  Would that be appropriate, insulting, or insufficient? I am nervous, because we had a guy with a Ph.D. in physics try to help her with the Intro to Counting and Probability class and it did not go well. I'm also nervous because our state flagship is not exactly "selective," and if YOU find the Intermediate algebra material challenging, I am honestly a bit afraid that grad students at the school might not be of much help. What do you think?

 

I'm not trying to terrify anyone, sorry about that!

It's just that I agree with daijobu that the challenge level does go up once you hit the intermediate level texts. Not always the regular material in the texts, but the level of problem solving offered (especially starred problems and challengers)

 

What I like (no, LOVE) about AoPS is that their stuff can take you as far as you desire to go. There's no other high school math series that I know of that offers such a level of challenger problems. As  daijobu pointed out, there are Putnam problems occasionally....the Putnam exam is for top college math students, and the average participant scores a 0 or 1 point on that test!

I can pick up Dolciani intermediate alg or precalc (which I also like...I was raised on Dolciani myself :) ) and I can virtually do any problem in those books without trying too hard. But not so AoPS...there is always something new to learn there.

Sometimes I read online that someone's kid "breezed through" the intermediate AoPS books. Those comments always leave me scratching my head. I suppose that they are skipping most of the challengers (or else they're winning the USAMO) Now, lewelma's son did do all the problems in his texts for several years without peeking at the answers, and he went to the IMO...hmmm!!

 

Of course, *no one* should feel that they have to solve every starred and challenger problem in AoPS, or even attempt ANY of them. Years ago I offered my version of an AoPS precalculus syllabus (using the intermediate alg and precalculus texts) that would give kids a good experience without killing them, you know?! (see post 5 in this old thread). It would still be an excellent AoPS experience!

My own kids just took AoPS online classes. None of their standard texts had been published yet, so our experience was different than it is today. They offered online lectures and problem sets, but there was no textbook. The kids still did NOT solve all of the homework problems, not by a long shot!

 

We did use the original Problem Solving texts at home. We worked through them together, and no one here could solve everything!! I'd just circle what we couldn't do; sometimes we'd circle back to those problems later, & sometimes we just skipped them.

It's the wrestling with the tough problems that really helped all of us grow. That's the point of AoPS, I think. Not to master *everything* in math (you can't run out ever) but to get better at *problem solving*

I think that looking for a tutor at your state college's math department would be an exellent idea! There are always poor math grad students looking to augment their incomes (LOL I remember those days!)

And I can understand why a physics PhD might not necessarily have been able to help your daughter. Counting & probability just isn't part of their usual math training,, unless they'd had an unusually broad education or had participated in Mathcounts or AMCs...

 

Apologies to OP for the sidetrack :rolleyes:


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#14 EmilyGF

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:34 AM

 

And I can understand why a physics PhD might not necessarily have been able to help your daughter. Counting & probability just isn't part of their usual math training,, unless they'd had an unusually broad education or had participated in Mathcounts or AMCs...

 

Apologies to OP for the sidetrack :rolleyes:

Yes! DS12 just finished Counting and Probability and my astrophysicist husband asked him to help him with a tricky counting problem one of his colleagues had punted on.

Emily


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#15 Roadrunner

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:48 AM

Off topic- sorry, OP!

Kathy, I find your posts equal parts enlightening and terrifying. Question: How do you think the difficulty level of the classes compare to the level of the books? The reason I ask is that I am of no use to my child whatsoever in math now. We have relied upon Ruth's brilliant and kind son to provide support in Geometry and Intermediate Algebra, but, since the boy selfishly wants to go off to college next year ( :glare:), I am feeling a bit terrified of the future (hopefully he'll stick around for Intermediate Number Theory, which starts next month :svengo: ). We are heading to our state flagship in a couple of weeks for our first college visit, and I was considered having DD suck up to the math department and beg for a tutor. Would that be appropriate, insulting, or insufficient? I am nervous, because we had a guy with a Ph.D. in physics try to help her with the Intro to Counting and Probability class and it did not go well. I'm also nervous because our state flagship is not exactly "selective," and if YOU find the Intermediate algebra material challenging, I am honestly a bit afraid that grad students at the school might not be of much help. What do you think?


I think the courses tend to be a little easier than doing the book if you are skipping the challenge section at the end of the textbook. It takes us a weeek to do a challenging section and we call them H weeks. Class might have one problem or at most two of that difficulty per week, but it doesn’t expect you to do 20 of them per topic as the book does. So I guess it’s all about how you use the book.
With class problems my kid can usually get 80% of those problems solved in under 1.5 hours. The other 20% takes time and effort.


And thank you Kathy for pointing out that Putnam was a college level math competition. I didn’t know it and now I won’t be expressing frustration at the lack of progress at some of those questions. 😳

Also in Intro books often AMC 12 or other higher level competition problems were part of the challenging section. In Intermediate Algebra we find AIME problems as part of section routinely. 🤕

Please somebody tell me precalculus book isn’t another massive step up.
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#16 Kathy in Richmond

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:50 AM

Please somebody tell me book isn’t another massive step up.

 We found the Precalculus book to be less challenging than Intermediate Alg. :001_smile:


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#17 kiana

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:51 AM

I was really proud to get a 1/120 the first time I took the Putnam :p That year I think it put me in the 53rd percentile. 


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#18 JoJosMom

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:55 AM

Thank you, Kathy and Emily! I am not a math person. At all. So AoPS texts may as well be written in hieroglyphics for me. :laugh: 

 

 


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#19 JoJosMom

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:00 PM

I think the courses tend to be a little easier than doing the book if you are skipping the challenge section at the end of the textbook. It takes us a weeek to do a challenging section and we call them H weeks. Class might have one problem or at most two of that difficulty per week, but it doesn’t expect you to do 20 of them per topic as the book does. So I guess it’s all about how you use the book.
With class problems my kid can usually get 80% of those problems solved in under 1.5 hours. The other 20% takes time and effort.


And thank you Kathy for pointing out that Putnam was a college level math competition. I didn’t know it and now I won’t be expressing frustration at the lack of progress at some of those questions. 😳

Also in Intro books often AMC 12 or other higher level competition problems were part of the challenging section. In Intermediate Algebra we find AIME problems as part of section routinely. 🤕

Please somebody tell me precalculus book isn’t another massive step up.

 

Thank you; the bolded answered my question. I kind of suspected that the "stump the math Ph.D." questions were more in the book than in the class. That is somewhat reassuring. We use the courses exclusively, because there is no way in h-e-double-hockey-sticks that the book alone would work. I can't help and working it on her own would not be a good fit for DD.
 


Edited by JoJosMom, 14 February 2018 - 12:48 PM.

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#20 JoJosMom

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:01 PM

DP; sorry.


Edited by JoJosMom, 14 February 2018 - 12:02 PM.


#21 skimomma

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:46 PM

Now you all have me scared too!  We are planning for Intermediate Algebra next year and we do not take the classes.  I have been able to help dd when she struggles up until now but I do NOT have a PhD in math (or anything else for that matter).  I am hoping that since dd has "grown up" on AoPS that my meager ability to help will not be needed often.  Dusting off my 30+ years old geometry skills has been traumatic enough!



#22 kiana

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 03:19 PM

Having problems that the kid can't do is actually a GOOD thing as long as they're extra, starred. One of the hard things for students to do is to get the idea that there are genuinely hard problems that they can't do immediately. It is a really good idea to return to them occasionally and see if they make sense now, because it is a tremendous feeling of victory when you finally do get them. 


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#23 daijobu

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:02 PM


Please somebody tell me precalculus book isn’t another massive step up.

 

Yeah, I didn't find the precalc book as hard as Intermediate Algebra.  IIRC, they cover roots of unity in precalc, and the author (Richard?) steps you through it in such a nice gentle way, beginning with some specific examples, then generalizing, then generalizing some more.  I've been meaning to go back and rework that section again, because it really is so lovely.  


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#24 Roadrunner

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:20 PM

Yeah, I didn't find the precalc book as hard as Intermediate Algebra. IIRC, they cover roots of unity in precalc, and the author (Richard?) steps you through it in such a nice gentle way, beginning with some specific examples, then generalizing, then generalizing some more. I've been meaning to go back and rework that section again, because it really is so lovely.


This is good to know because Intermediate Algebra is really pushing us to the edge.
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#25 daijobu

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:23 PM

I feel ya.  

 

<Turns the page>  "Another chapter on polynomials?!?!?"


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#26 Roadrunner

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:43 PM

I feel ya.

<Turns the page> "Another chapter on polynomials?!?!?"


And my kid is strange. Polynomials were not too bad around here prompting me to think maybe we were in a clear. Not so fast. He ended up finding some parts of sequences chapter really difficult. Same with radicals. Some sections from that chapter were tough for him, yet nobody ever mentions those particular topics being hard.
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#27 bibsandmegs

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:15 PM

My DD is taking the class, so I cannot answer your direct question. I do, however, have a question for you: Has your student(s?) already taken Algebra 2 in school or are you considering AoPS Intermediate Algebra for that class? AoPS Intermediate Algebra assumes knowledge of much of the material contained in an introductory    a traditional Algebra II course, as that material is covered in the AoPS introductory book.
 
If you already covered that and I missed it, my apologies. I'm still caffeinating! :001_smile:
 
EDIT to fix my bolded glaring error! Ack! Off to get more coffee!


My children have not taken Algebra 2 anywhere else. My DH considers the Algebra 1 curriculum we've done to be excellent (Foerster's and Chalkdust). I've told him we will have to fo back and do some of the Intro to Algebra book before moving into the Int Algebra book. He's not too convinced. That's what I get for trying to argue with an Engineer who has a minor in math. :)

-Lisa

#28 bibsandmegs

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:19 PM

I consider myself to be pretty mathy, and we've been using AoPS at home since prealgebra.  I worked through Intermediate Algebra with one dd and my other dd studied it independently of me.  If I recall, this is the first book in the Intermediate series?  It's a big jump up from the Introduction series.  
 
I have it open on my lap now, and there is a problem from Putnam, HMMT, and... Canada.  (We joked that these countries that were cited were lobbing weapons of math destruction on us.)  I have penciled in to a problem (incidentally not a Putnam or HMMT problem) "I don't understand the solution :-( "
 
There were a lot of problems that I couldn't understand, even with the solution.  But we were mellow about that, though somewhat less mellow about no fewer than 4 chapters about polynomials.  But it's good for you, because polynomials come up a lot on the AMC 12.  (And the Putnam, apparently.)   My dd's are much stronger in polynomials than I am.  
 
If you haven't used AoPS before, why are you switching now?



We've used some AoPS in the past, BA and Alcumus. The biggest reason is that my kids can't stand Chalkdust or Foerster's. My husband likes both of those, but is willing to entertain AoPS. We will see who wins, the kids or DH. I'm just the middle woman doing the research. :)

-Lisa

#29 bibsandmegs

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:20 PM

Off topic- sorry, OP!
 
Kathy, I find your posts equal parts enlightening and terrifying. Question: How do you think the difficulty level of the classes compare to the level of the books?  The reason I ask is that I am of no use to my child whatsoever in math now. We have relied upon Ruth's brilliant and kind son to provide support in Geometry and Intermediate Algebra, but, since the boy selfishly wants to go off to college next year ( :glare:), I am feeling a bit terrified of the future (hopefully he'll stick around for Intermediate Number Theory, which starts next month :svengo: ). We are heading to our state flagship in a couple of weeks for our first college visit, and I was considered having DD suck up to the math department and beg for a tutor.  Would that be appropriate, insulting, or insufficient? I am nervous, because we had a guy with a Ph.D. in physics try to help her with the Intro to Counting and Probability class and it did not go well. I'm also nervous because our state flagship is not exactly "selective," and if YOU find the Intermediate algebra material challenging, I am honestly a bit afraid that grad students at the school might not be of much help. What do you think?



I don't consider this to be off topic. It's more info on a related topic, and I've appreciated the insight. So, thank you!!

-Lisa (the OP)
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#30 JoJosMom

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:53 PM

We've used some AoPS in the past, BA and Alcumus. The biggest reason is that my kids can't stand Chalkdust or Foerster's. My husband likes both of those, but is willing to entertain AoPS. We will see who wins, the kids or DH. I'm just the middle woman doing the research. :)

-Lisa

 

Maybe you should conspire communicate with Kathy in Richmond to find the most difficult challenge problems in each text, present them to your husband, and tell him, "Have at it!" :laugh:

 

I know that Foerster's is an excellent text, but AoPS is just a whole 'nuther ball of wax.

 

Best of luck to you all, research mom!


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#31 Lilaclady

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 03:01 PM

My children have not taken Algebra 2 anywhere else. My DH considers the Algebra 1 curriculum we've done to be excellent (Foerster's and Chalkdust). I've told him we will have to fo back and do some of the Intro to Algebra book before moving into the Int Algebra book. He's not too convinced. That's what I get for trying to argue with an Engineer who has a minor in math. :)

-Lisa

I think it will be good to get the books and have him go over them to see how they compare.

#32 Roadrunner

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 03:25 PM

I think it will be good to get the books and have him go over them to see how they compare.


Yes, I do think books are a good investment.

I also want to point out that University of California system considers Algebra B (which covers the second half of the Intro text) equivalent to Algebra 2 for it’s a through g system.

Also Intermediate Algebra course states that kids who already completed honors Algebra 2 (not Algebra 1) might be ready for it.
Just giving you arguments to share with your DH.

The best is of course getting the books to see for yourself.
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#33 madteaparty

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 11:47 PM

No. And there’s no amount of money or love in the world that would make me, a non-mathy person, or DH, a somewhat-mathy person, do so. We quit around Intro to Alg 2.
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#34 JoJosMom

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 09:27 AM

No. And there’s no amount of money or love in the world that would make me, a non-mathy person, or DH, a somewhat-mathy person, do so. We quit around Intro to Alg 2.

 

:smilielol5:

 

Oh, yeah, baby. About three-quarters of the way through the INTRO book I threw DD into the classes and told her, "You're on your own, kiddo. Best of luck."


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#35 Roadrunner

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 01:00 PM

No. And there’s no amount of money or love in the world that would make me, a non-mathy person, or DH, a somewhat-mathy person, do so. We quit around Intro to Alg 2.



😂😂😂

We are staring down an IMO problem right now in the middle of the review section, not even in the challenging section. 🤯
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#36 deerforest

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 01:31 PM

My DD has been able to do AoPS algebra 1 mostly on her own AFTER completing Foerster's algebra with me. Foerster's was fine, but we found it conceptually lacking and motivated us to come back to AoPS. There's no way she'd be ready to move on to Intermediate AoPS algebra after Foerster's algebra 1. I think we'll finish the Intro book and count it as algebra 2 like others said.



#37 Kendall

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 01:52 PM

I am currently using both Foerster Algebra 1 and AoPs Intro to Algebra with my 8th grader, and Foerster Alg 2 with my older 2 girls. Foerster Algebra 1 does not cover everything in intro to Algebra. Don't be fooled by the title "Introductory".  I'm not as familiar with the second half of Intro, but a lot of it looks like what is in Foerster Alg 2. You definitely would not want to start in Intermediate. They could start at the beginning of Intro and do chapter reviews until they get to new material. And there will be some new material in the chapters that cover the same concepts that Foerster Algebra 1 does. I think you need some of Intermediate also to cover all of what Foerster Alg 2 covers (not counting the trig in either book). 



#38 snowbeltmom

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 02:43 PM

My children have not taken Algebra 2 anywhere else. My DH considers the Algebra 1 curriculum we've done to be excellent (Foerster's and Chalkdust). I've told him we will have to fo back and do some of the Intro to Algebra book before moving into the Int Algebra book. He's not too convinced. That's what I get for trying to argue with an Engineer who has a minor in math. :)

-Lisa

Has your husband looked at the AoPS Introduction to Algebra and the Intermediate Algebra books? 

 

Fwiw, I also am an engineer with a minor in math.  There is no way my kids would have had the background knowledge necessary to go from an Algebra I course to the AoPS Intermediate Algebra book.



#39 Arcadia

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Posted 16 February 2018 - 03:26 PM

I've told him we will have to go back and do some of the Intro to Algebra book before moving into the Int Algebra book. He's not too convinced. That's what I get for trying to argue with an Engineer who has a minor in math. :)-Lisa

 
What worked was making my kids ask my husband for help with AoPS while I cook dinner. My DS12 doesn’t do well self studying and my DS13 doesn’t have time to tutor him every day so he took AoPS online classes to have someone else to bug since it was cheaper than hiring a local math tutor. My DS13 started his first AoPS online class with intermediate algebra and Intro to geometry because he felt lonely doing it himself even though he finished about half of each book self studying. He was lucky in that he was able to form online study groups in most of his AoPS online classes.

So DS13 could have self studied intermediate algebra and Intro to geometry but my husband and I was willing to pay up for the social aspect because he looks forwards to class and has someone other than us (parents) to discuss math problems with. DS13 helps tutor DS12 when he is free because DS12’s AoPS online classes didn’t have informal study groups and DS12 isn’t a self starter.

We will see who wins, the kids or DH.

My husband has never won the obstinate contest over his kids. His persuasive ability/skills didn’t work either.

#40 lewelma

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Posted 17 February 2018 - 12:15 AM

There is a difference between the content and the problem solving.  DS spent almost 3 years on the Intro Algebra book, and no other kid I know of has taken this long. This was because he was learning (no, mastering) the problem solving in addition to the content.  So when he hit the intermediate series, he was ready for the problem solving at that level.  If you haven't put the hours in earlier (like DS), you need to expect that AoPS Intermediate Algebra will be a double class - one class in the traditional content and one class in the problem solving. A double class takes double time.  So plan accordingly. The series is called the Art of Problem Solving, NOT the Art of Mathematics. I think kids who love problem solving gravitate to the series; whereas kids who just love math, prefer books like Foresters.

 

Ruth in NZ


Edited by lewelma, 17 February 2018 - 04:07 PM.

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#41 AEC

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Posted 18 February 2018 - 01:06 AM

this thread has made me feel much better about myself.  We've done AoPS since Pre-Alg.  We're currently mid-way through AlgII (just finished polynomials....woot woot!!!).  I have never had to look at the solution manual this much.  It feels like we're slogging through...and this is just HARD.  At least we're not the only ones.


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