Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo

Department visit: what would YOU want to know?


17 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#1 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 27111 posts

Posted 20 January 2018 - 06:19 PM

I will be responsible for meeting with prospective students (and their families) who are visiting our department. 

I want to prepare a good list of things that could be relevant for them. 

What information would YOU, as a parent taking the student to their campus visit, want the department to present? (department specific and not about the school as a whole)

 

I already have on my list:

what people can do with the degree

what our graduates do after graduation

departmental scholarships

undergraduate research

all classes in the major taught by faculty, not grad TAs

all classes in the major guarantee a spot in the semester they need to take the course

overview over the curriculum

number of majors/class sizes

individualized advising

Society of Physics Students 

 

Of course they can always ask questions, but some people may not know what questions to ask.

So, what else would you suggest I should include?

 


  • dmmetler, Lanny and Kassia like this

#2 Elastimom

Elastimom

    Hive Mind Larvae

  • Members
  • 35 posts

Posted 20 January 2018 - 06:27 PM

Summer internship opportunities


  • regentrude, Attolia, Grantmom and 3 others like this

#3 happysmileylady

happysmileylady

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4660 posts

Posted 20 January 2018 - 06:43 PM

I was going to say internships too. 

 

Also, what classes are helpful in high school.  DD22 and I visited campuses in her sophomore year of high school.  People were SHOCKED and when we asked questions like, "what high school classes are the most helpful for this major?" people didn't know how to answer.  Which it's true that you will likely be dealing with upper classmen, and that within physics, there are some obvious things, having an answer that goes beyond the obvious would have been great.  DD22 didn't take a roots class until her senior year, spring semester. 

 

What opportunities set your department apart from the same department at other schools.  DD22 specifically chose Ball State for the Storm Chase Team, which wasn't available at other schools.

 

Are there department specific work study or job options available?  Like, do some professors offer positions as student assistants?  Is there a department specific tutoring center where tutors can be paid?  That sort of thing.

 

Do you have any leads on any OUTSIDE scholarships specific to the field of study?

 

Physics is a difficult field of study, how likely are majors within your field to graduate within 4 yrs?

 

Graduate degrees available?  (DD22's original major offered a BS and an MS, but not a doctorate.)

 

Difficulty carrying a double major specific to your department.  Also...minors available?

 

ETA:  I am not suggesting that you include all of this in a specific presentation but rather than knowing the answers to questions like these could be helpful. 

 


Edited by happysmileylady, 20 January 2018 - 06:45 PM.

  • dmmetler, regentrude, Grantmom and 4 others like this

#4 Heigh Ho

Heigh Ho

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12368 posts

Posted 20 January 2018 - 08:18 PM

any honors sections?

undergrad research funding? mutlidisciplinary?

areas of strength 

what lab equipment is available

labs at night?

companies that hire from the U/dept

is it possible to succeed if from a small high school that didn't offer high school physics 

colloquium

observatory

 


Edited by Heigh Ho, 20 January 2018 - 08:19 PM.

  • regentrude, Grantmom and OneStepAtATime like this

#5 8FillTheHeart

8FillTheHeart

    Alice or Mad Hatter or maybe a little of both

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14419 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:41 AM

I think most of the biggies have already been listed. A more I can think of
Do your professors volunteer to be mentors for UGs?
Where have students from your dept been accepted for REUs?

Not a typical question, but how does the dept work with students who arrive with an atypical background and need more than the standard 4 yr sequence? Independent study? Access to grad courses?
  • regentrude and Tsuga like this

#6 Tsuga

Tsuga

    WannaBee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7927 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 10:59 AM

How does your department look at requests to double major?
  • regentrude and PinkyandtheBrains. like this

#7 idnib

idnib

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5347 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 05:46 PM

Will a typical high school calculus (or diff equations, depending) class be good enough, or should the student re-take the class at the university to succeed in this major?



#8 regentrude

regentrude

    Qualified Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 27111 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 06:13 PM

Will a typical high school calculus (or diff equations, depending) class be good enough, or should the student re-take the class at the university to succeed in this major?

 

I don't understand this question. A typical high school class in whatever subject never waives the requirement of the college classes required for any degree program. Unless students have AP credit (which is not a "typical" hs class), they must take calc (or whatever other required subject) at the university.

 

Is that different anywhere else? Are there colleges that waive required math classes because the student had a regular high school class in the subject?



#9 idnib

idnib

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5347 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:13 PM

I don't understand this question. A typical high school class in whatever subject never waives the requirement of the college classes required for any degree program. Unless students have AP credit (which is not a "typical" hs class), they must take calc (or whatever other required subject) at the university.

 

Is that different anywhere else? Are there colleges that waive required math classes because the student had a regular high school class in the subject?

 

I'm not an expert; my oldest is only in 8th and I've been reading about high school planning and college visits. I've read reports from students (not here, on CC and elsewhere over the last few months) saying that they wished they had taken calculus at university even though it wasn't required of them. What situation exempted them I am not sure, perhaps AP or DE or some other school policy.

 

As a personal anecdote, I took AP Calc in high school, earned top scores on the exam, and am still grateful someone gave me the advice to take the university calc course before embarking on my degree. It was much more dynamic and interesting, and integrated well into the rest of my required courses. The downside was having to take more credits that I wished in order to finish on time. So I was coming at it from that angle as well, and if I were visiting I would ask what was suggested for this particular program.

 

I'll rephrase my question: Would you recommend a student who would be exempt from taking calculus at the university take it anyway if pursuing a physics degree?


  • regentrude and Tsuga like this

#10 Tsuga

Tsuga

    WannaBee

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7927 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 07:18 PM

I don't understand this question. A typical high school class in whatever subject never waives the requirement of the college classes required for any degree program. Unless students have AP credit (which is not a "typical" hs class), they must take calc (or whatever other required subject) at the university.

Is that different anywhere else? Are there colleges that waive required math classes because the student had a regular high school class in the subject?


Many students go from high school calc I to the college equivalent of the next course. You don't repeat algebra in college so why repeat calculus, is the logic.

So if calculus is required many people will expect that if they have taken calc I and II and are in the following math class, that would be sufficient to enroll in a course requiring calculus.

#11 SebastianCat

SebastianCat

    Hive Mind Level 5 Worker: Forager Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1837 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:09 PM

I probably wouldn't include this info in a presentation, but I'd be prepared to answer the questions, "How many of your students who start out as physics majors end up switching majors?"   and  "What courses are considered weed-out courses or important milestones toward a successful degree?"

 

When I was in college 25ish years ago, I was a biology major, and close to half of the biology major students ended up switching majors after Organic Chemistry I, which was considered a weed-out course.   Many of those students became psychology majors.



#12 teachermom2834

teachermom2834

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2864 posts

Posted 21 January 2018 - 08:39 PM

I have a senior and my biggest questions right now are about advising. I know you listed individualized advising. I want to know how that works, how easy is it for the student to schedule advising and access the advisor, etc.

My ds will go to college with 36 hours of de across a variety of subjects. His college uploaded the courses to his portal and they are accepting all the credits toward his degree. That is great! But it really, really messes up the suggested eight semester sequence. We are doing a visit in March and I want to know who will be advising him and how it will work. I am really looking for someone to say they will be committed to helping him navigate that.

Also, my ds is interested in a special early grad school admission through his college. The requirements are stated but I want to know how many students have been successful taking advantage of this program. What rough percentage of those that head down this path actually get the early grad school admittance? If your department has any special programs I would want to know how successful students are at completing them.
  • regentrude, Tsuga and Kassia like this

#13 Lanny

Lanny

    Powered by Banana Splits

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7675 posts

Posted 22 January 2018 - 01:41 PM

I like the fact that your classes are taught by Professors. I have explained to my DD what a blessing that is. I have also explained to her about class size, especially in General courses for Undergraduates. How nice it would be if the Professor actually knew your name. How nice it might be if you could work with a Professor on something. Not to be taking English 101 in an auditorium with 100+ students, but in a classroom.

 

So, typical class size for Freshmen would be high on my list.

 

The ranking of the school with employers, for various Majors the school is strong in, would be useful information to prospective students. For example, I worked on a temporary contract assignment for a very large Aerospace company years ago. The first time I was there, I was told that they had a list of approximately 50 universities. If one wasn't a graduate of one of those universities, their badge did not have the title "Engineer" on it.  Their diploma might have said "Engineering", but not their badge.

 

ETA: Success of graduating students finding their first professional job would also be interesting.


Edited by Lanny, 22 January 2018 - 01:43 PM.

  • Kassia likes this

#14 Laura Corin

Laura Corin

    She who plants flowers for bees

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24183 posts

Posted 22 January 2018 - 01:42 PM

Assessment pattern: class tests, essays, exams

Average contact hours

Attitude to gap years/deferral

 


Edited by Laura Corin, 22 January 2018 - 01:43 PM.


#15 daijobu

daijobu

    Hive Mind Worker Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2561 posts

Posted 22 January 2018 - 11:03 PM

Do physics majors have room in their schedule to take advantage of overseas studies offered by your university?

Is there a separate application process for admission to physics major (like at some engineering schools)?

Is it difficult for students to get a spot in some key classes?  (I've heard at the UCs students may be wait listed for courses necessary for their major or to graduate.)  

When is the latest one can reasonably begin the course sequence of a physics major?  

 



#16 Attolia

Attolia

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4115 posts

Posted 23 January 2018 - 10:16 AM

another vote for internship opportunities, particular examples of internships that those in your major have been offered.


Edited by Attolia, 23 January 2018 - 10:16 AM.


#17 amy58103

amy58103

    Just Visiting

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 130 posts

Posted 23 January 2018 - 01:06 PM

How feasible is it for a student to major in physics and play a sport?  Anyone succesfully done it?  (assuming your school has more than intramural/club sports)



#18 Sebastian (a lady)

Sebastian (a lady)

    Apprentice Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12615 posts

Posted 23 January 2018 - 04:10 PM

How tight is the course plan? Can a student struggle first semester or first year and still complete the degree?

Do students typically have to validate or take summer courses to graduate in 4 years (evidently it's common for CS students at my son's college to take discrete math over the summer at a CC and transfer it in.