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Book a Week 2018 - BW3: Travels along the Silk Road


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#51 RootAnn

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 07:56 PM

Finally made some progress here. Under the silver lining category (like Violet Crown's burned fingers), I unexpectedly spent several days at the hospital with close friends as the husband aspirated a medical swish into his lungs and developed chemical pneumonia. (So glad I went and was able to help. He died early yesterday morning - at home.) So, I had some extra time to read.

 

I finished listening to The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared. Definitely funny & engaging.

I finished the Laura Ingalls Wilder Prairie Fires. I disliked the large amount of space spent on Rose Wilder Lane. I know, I know - she was a huge influence on her mom, helped extensively edit her mom's books, etc. etc. I never liked her and resented spending good reading time on discussions of her travels, her foibles, her obsessions, and her moods. I also felt the author's political beliefs slanted the information in the book. I got tired of reading the author's rants and interpretations of what Laura and Rose really believed and meant.   :cool:  (I also came away with the impression that Rose Wilder Lane was a cougar.  :001_huh: ) I dislike Roger McBride even more than I used to. Blah.

 

Haven't decided what to attack next. Considering a light read like LM Montgomery's Pat of Silver Bush or Emily of New Moon. Or, SWB's Rethinking School (but I'm supposed to pass that along to a friend who needs it first). Or . . . back to my Audible list.


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#52 Violet Crown

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 08:13 PM

While homeschooling huddled upstairs, hiding from the "Ice storm" and sub-freezing temperatures that have immobilized Central Texas, because we none of us apparently can drive over thin patches of gathered sleet, I finished two very short books, The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf and The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark.

 

The former was one of a stack of NYRB reprints I lucked into finding at the library discard store; it's mid-19th-century German, a tale being told in the context of a baptismal dinner, about a medieval village's desperate pact with the devil and the horrors ensuing. Let's just say, don't read this excellent book if you have a hint of arachnophobia.

 

The latter is a 1961 novel being celebrated at the moment in Spark's Edinburgh, this being her centenary. I quite like the technique of moving forward and backward in time, triangulating on a particular important event, with significant plot information casually dropped into the narrative from time to time. A little challenging as a homeschooler not to frown and think, "That woman really needed to prepare her students for their exams!"

 

Scurrying back now to 19th-century France with the Abbe Theodore Ratisbonne's Life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux. it's funny how the prose style--even accommodating for different translators--in this hagiography is so similar to that of Eugene Sue's anti-Catholic The Wandering Jew. A sample:

 

O mother of St. Bernard! O mother of seven-fold blessed, and worthy of blessing from all the children of the Church, deign, I beseech you, to guide the pen which ventures to write the history of your son; that the example of his virtue, and the glory of his sanctity, may animate, console, and kindle us who live so poorly in these latter days. Alas! we can scarce believe the wonders of old time, so rare have they become since charity has waxed so cold upon this earth!

 

 

(If you're wondering how one can read much of this kind of thing ... the trick is to wallow.)


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#53 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:48 AM

Mmm I just finished a book that our library tagged as 15th century, so I picked it for a bingo square, but it is only about an 15th century book, and completely set in current times...
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#54 Negin

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 02:39 AM

Looking forward to your reads about Italy and your travels. Always exciting to hear about your travels!   

 

Thank you. Robin. You are kind. 


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#55 tuesdayschild

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 03:56 AM

Not sure why, but I cannot get quote or multi–quote to work on the forums tonight so will just chat unquoted in this post.

 

I’ve decided to take a few months to include any the Katherine Kellgren audiobooks I haven’t listened to yet, as my own personal nod to her death earlier this month. So sad to lose such a gifted narrator so young.

Many of the books that are mentioned on these threads I cannot source through our town's library; but, amazingly they do have quite a few of Kellgren’s audiobooks available via Overdrive. (These are predominantly children's books ie: The Incorrigible Children, a few in the Bloody Jack series, and a few Her Royal Spyness titles.)

 

With a few of you mentioning SWB’s new book, and the Forma podcasts …

thanks,  :)  after listening to the first podcast, I now have another book I want to purchase.  These threads should come with danger warnings

 

A few of you have posted about The Dark is Rising which encourage me to actually try to read it this year. 

 

Margaret, Wind of Blame (audio) is a favourite cosy mystery for me, hope your daughter enjoys it too!

 

mumto2, the Miss. Buncle series is ‘nice’.  :tongue_smilie:   I enjoyed the first book, Miss. Buncle’s Book, the most.   


Edited by tuesdayschild, 17 January 2018 - 08:11 PM.

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#56 mumto2

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 07:44 AM

Finally made some progress here. Under the silver lining category (like Violet Crown's burned fingers), I unexpectedly spent several days at the hospital with close friends as the husband aspirated a medical swish into his lungs and developed chemical pneumonia. (So glad I went and was able to help. He died early yesterday morning - at home.) So, I had some extra time to read.
 
I finished listening to The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared. Definitely funny & engaging.
I finished the Laura Ingalls Wilder Prairie Fires. I disliked the large amount of space spent on Rose Wilder Lane. I know, I know - she was a huge influence on her mom, helped extensively edit her mom's books, etc. etc. I never liked her and resented spending good reading time on discussions of her travels, her foibles, her obsessions, and her moods. I also felt the author's political beliefs slanted the information in the book. I got tired of reading the author's rants and interpretations of what Laura and Rose really believed and meant.   :cool:  (I also came away with the impression that Rose Wilder Lane was a cougar.  :001_huh: ) I dislike Roger McBride even more than I used to. Blah.
 
Haven't decided what to attack next. Considering a light read like LM Montgomery's Pat of Silver Bush or Emily of New Moon. Or, SWB's Rethinking School (but I'm supposed to pass that along to a friend who needs it first). Or . . . back to my Audible list.

 

:grouphug: I am so sorry for your loss. I saw your post on the other thread and feel so bad for your kids(and you). My kids lost their friend that was like their grandpa three years ago. It was so hard on them because he spent a lot of time with them and attended all their stuff. We still spend a lot of time with his wife. Their presence in our lives has been a really special blessing.

 

Mmm I just finished a book that our library tagged as 15th century, so I picked it for a bingo square, but it is only about an 15th century book, and completely set in current times...


:lol: I hope it was a good book!


My next audio book is going to be the first in The Dark is Rising Series.

I also finished the Pinball portion of Wind\Pinball I enjoyed it. I am looking forward to moving on with my Murakami month with The Wild Sheep Chase. https://www.goodread...0-wind-pinball. BTW, because the name for Wind is really Hear the Wind Sing I am using it as an H for Chrysanthemum. I also used it as my translated boom in Bingo.
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#57 JennyD

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 08:16 AM

RootAnn, I am so sorry to hear about your friend's death.  That is just awful.

 

 

 

 

 The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark.

 

 

I have been meaning to read this forever, good to hear that you enjoyed it.


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#58 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 08:56 AM

:lol: I hope it was a good book!
.


It was a good story, so I finished it nevertheless. But now I have to look for an other one for that square... :)
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#59 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:45 AM

So to set my English BAW bingo squares vocabulary right:

A detective is about a murder or fraud and the question who did it?
A crime is about drugs, smuggle, what ever breaks the law?
A mystery is about puzzles and riddles and the queest how to solve?
Cozy is about cats, tea, chocolate and knitting?????????
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#60 Penguin

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:16 PM

Loesje, my take on the bingo vocab is below. But I, of course, have no authority in the matter. These are just my interpretations and official explanations from Robin override my comments.

 

Detective: Normally, I would want my book to include an actual detective - a member of the police force with the job of solving crimes. However, since I see it is Amateur Detective listed on the Mystery Square, I would be looking for someone who is NOT employed by law enforcement. Father Brown and Nancy Drew come to mind.

 

Crime: This one is on the main Bingo square, so I don't take it to mean that it has to be a mystery. A true crime book would work here - that is what I would probably use.

 

Mystery: Books classified as mysteries are the obvious choice (plenty of mystery readers here to offer guidance!), But once again, since this is on the main Bingo Board, I think that I feel like I could take some liberties here. There are plenty of real-world unsolved mysteries to read about, too.

 

Cozy: There are cozy mysteries, but I don't read mysteries so I will leave it to one of the other BaW posters to define. Beyond mysteries, yes, I think cats, knitting and all variants of hygge apply. 

 

Hope this helps!


Edited by Penguin, 17 January 2018 - 12:42 PM.

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#61 chiguirre

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:26 PM

I picked up A Boy in Winter by Rachel Seiffert for my snow day reading yesterday and it's an engrossing read. It starts off on the day the Wehrmacht appears in a Ukrainian town as the Red Army retreats burning everything in its path in 1941. I'm about 1/4 of the way in and I can't put it down. It's a short book so I'll probably finish it today or tomorrow.
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#62 mumto2

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:48 PM

I just erased my post in case anyone ends up confused. I should have looked at the bingo card!

I agree with Penguin but would love Robin’s interpretation of Crime. I had been thinking along the lines of a gritty police procedural but am now thinking true crime.

Cozy mysteries have a non professional sleuth. In recent years many have been written involving food, knitting, and about any hobby one can think of! Miss Marple is a perfect example. I think of them as gentle mysteries that you can give a young teen easily. They can involve murder but the description is gentle along the lines of ‘Mr. Green was found on the floor of the library with a candlestick beside him’ for the scene of the crime. I am using a Carola Dunn for this square.

Edited by mumto2, 17 January 2018 - 01:07 PM.

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#63 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 12:52 PM

Loesje, my take on the bingo vocab is below. But I, of course, have no authority in the matter. These are just my interpretations and official explanations from Robin override my comments.

Detective: Normally, I would want my book to include an actual detective - a member of the police force with the job of solving crimes. However, since I see Amateur Detective on the Mystery Square, I would be looking for someone who is NOT employed by law enforcement. Father Brown and Nancy Drew come to mind.

Crime: This one is on the main Bingo square, so I don't take it to mean that it has to be a mystery. A true crime book would work here - that is what I would probably use.

Mystery: Books classified as mysteries are the obvious choice (plenty of mystery readers here to offer guidance!), But once again, since this is on the main Bingo Board, I think that I feel like I could take some liberties here. There are plenty of real-world unsolved mysteries to read about, too.

Cozy: There are cozy mysteries, but I don't read mysteries so I will leave it to one of the other BaW posters to define. Beyond mysteries, yes, I think cats, knitting and all variants of hygge apply.

Hope this helps!


Thanks!
I think I have a translation problem with ‘mysterie’
Mysterie is not a section here in adult fiction so books are not classified that way.
We have detective (kind of sherlock symbol)
Crime (gun symbol)
And adventure (compass symbol)

When I google for mysterie on the site of the library I got things like:
The mystery of stonehenge or
The mystery of the statues of ‘Paaseiland’ (Eastern Island?)...
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#64 Penguin

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 01:05 PM

Thanks!
I think I have a translation problem with ‘mysterie’
Mysterie is not a section here in adult fiction so books are not classified that way.
We have detective (kind of sherlock symbol)
Crime (gun symbol)
And adventure (compass symbol)

When I google for mysterie on the site of the library I got things like:
The mystery of stonehenge or
The mystery of the statues of ‘Paaseiland’ (Eastern Island?)...

Ah, OK...I see!

 

The mystery of Stonehenge would be an example of a real-life mystery. 

 

Mystery novels are fiction that center around a puzzle to solve. Usually the puzzle is some sort of crime. Mumto2 and Amy can surely give you plenty of suggestions :) Agatha Christie would be an example of a mystery writer in English. I read Outsider in Amsterdam by Janwillem van de Wetering last year, and that is considered a mystery.


Edited by Penguin, 17 January 2018 - 01:06 PM.

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#65 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 01:11 PM

Ah, OK...I see!

The mystery of Stonehenge would be an example of a real-life mystery.

Mystery novels are fiction that center around a puzzle to solve. Usually the puzzle is some sort of crime. Mumto2 and Amy can surely give you plenty of suggestions :) Agatha Christie would be an example of a mystery writer in English. I read Outsider in Amsterdam by Janwillem van de Wetering last year, and that is considered a mystery.


Thanks again!

So this could be a mystery:
https://www.goodread...netiaans-geheim

:heading of to choir practice:
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#66 Penguin

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 01:19 PM

Thanks again!

So this could be a mystery:
https://www.goodread...netiaans-geheim

:heading of to choir practice:

I would say yes, that is a mystery book.


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#67 loesje22000

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 03:36 PM

I would say yes, that is a mystery book.


Thanks again!!! :)
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#68 Penguin

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 04:19 PM

Root Ann, I am sorry to hear about your friend's death. What a tragedy  :grouphug: .

 

--

 

I have two books to report as finished:

 

Swallowing Mercury by Wioletta Greg. A coming-of-age series of vignettes about a village girl in Poland in the 1980s. The author is primarily a poet, and her prose is poetic. But ultimately, I found it forgettable. It was on the longlist for the 2017 Man Booker International Prize.

 

Head in Flames by Lance Olsen. I guess you would call this one experimental fiction. It alternates between three voices: Vincent Van Gough, filmmaker Theo Van Gogh (Vincent's brother's great-grandson), and the man who murdered Theo on the streets of Amsterdam in 2004. I found it disturbing, provocative, brutal, and well worth my time. I won't forget this one anytime soon.

 


Edited by Penguin, 17 January 2018 - 04:24 PM.

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#69 Mothersweets

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 04:54 PM

Finally made some progress here. Under the silver lining category (like Violet Crown's burned fingers), I unexpectedly spent several days at the hospital with close friends as the husband aspirated a medical swish into his lungs and developed chemical pneumonia. (So glad I went and was able to help. He died early yesterday morning - at home.) So, I had some extra time to read.

 

I finished listening to The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared. Definitely funny & engaging.

I finished the Laura Ingalls Wilder Prairie Fires. I disliked the large amount of space spent on Rose Wilder Lane. I know, I know - she was a huge influence on her mom, helped extensively edit her mom's books, etc. etc. I never liked her and resented spending good reading time on discussions of her travels, her foibles, her obsessions, and her moods. I also felt the author's political beliefs slanted the information in the book. I got tired of reading the author's rants and interpretations of what Laura and Rose really believed and meant.   :cool:  (I also came away with the impression that Rose Wilder Lane was a cougar.  :001_huh: ) I dislike Roger McBride even more than I used to. Blah.

 

Haven't decided what to attack next. Considering a light read like LM Montgomery's Pat of Silver Bush or Emily of New Moon. Or, SWB's Rethinking School (but I'm supposed to pass that along to a friend who needs it first). Or . . . back to my Audible list.

 

I'm sorry about your friend :(

 

I read Prairie Fires last month and was surprised at the amount of Rose in the book. I really didn't like her but it seemed as though she had some kind of mental illness.   And Roger McBride - ugh. No idea he was such a schemer.  I was hoping to read more about Almanzo but there wasn't much about him. 
SaveSave


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#70 Mothersweets

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 04:59 PM

Not sure why, but I cannot get quote or multi–quote to work on the forums tonight so will just chat unquoted in this post.

 

I’ve decided to take a few months to include any the Katherine Kellgren audiobooks I haven’t listened to yet, as my own personal nod to her death earlier this month. So sad to loose such a gifted narrator so young.

Many of the books that are mentioned on these threads I cannot source through our towns library; but, amazingly they do have quite a few of Kellgren’s audiobooks available via Overdrive.

 

 

Oh no! I didn't know she had passed away! I've been listening on and off to her narrating Her Royal Spyness series ( I think I am on #9) and she really did a super job with all the voices. I'll miss her. https://www.audible....X8MTZRGP4XXC8E
SaveSave


Edited by Mothersweets, 17 January 2018 - 05:01 PM.

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#71 Robin M

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:20 PM

So to set my English BAW bingo squares vocabulary right:

A detective is about a murder or fraud and the question who did it?
A crime is about drugs, smuggle, what ever breaks the law?
A mystery is about puzzles and riddles and the queest how to solve?
Cozy is about cats, tea, chocolate and knitting?????????

 

 

Loesje, my take on the bingo vocab is below. But I, of course, have no authority in the matter. These are just my interpretations and official explanations from Robin override my comments.

 

Detective: Normally, I would want my book to include an actual detective - a member of the police force with the job of solving crimes. However, since I see it is Amateur Detective listed on the Mystery Square, I would be looking for someone who is NOT employed by law enforcement. Father Brown and Nancy Drew come to mind.

 

Crime: This one is on the main Bingo square, so I don't take it to mean that it has to be a mystery. A true crime book would work here - that is what I would probably use.

 

Mystery: Books classified as mysteries are the obvious choice (plenty of mystery readers here to offer guidance!), But once again, since this is on the main Bingo Board, I think that I feel like I could take some liberties here. There are plenty of real-world unsolved mysteries to read about, too.

 

Cozy: There are cozy mysteries, but I don't read mysteries so I will leave it to one of the other BaW posters to define. Beyond mysteries, yes, I think cats, knitting and all variants of hygge apply. 

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

I just erased my post in case anyone ends up confused. I should have looked at the bingo card!

I agree with Penguin but would love Robin’s interpretation of Crime. I had been thinking along the lines of a gritty police procedural but am now thinking true crime.

Cozy mysteries have a non professional sleuth. In recent years many have been written involving food, knitting, and about any hobby one can think of! Miss Marple is a perfect example. I think of them as gentle mysteries that you can give a young teen easily. They can involve murder but the description is gentle along the lines of ‘Mr. Green was found on the floor of the library with a candlestick beside him’ for the scene of the crime. I am using a Carola Dunn for this square.

 

 

Thanks!
I think I have a translation problem with ‘mysterie’
Mysterie is not a section here in adult fiction so books are not classified that way.
We have detective (kind of sherlock symbol)
Crime (gun symbol)
And adventure (compass symbol)

When I google for mysterie on the site of the library I got things like:
The mystery of stonehenge or
The mystery of the statues of ‘Paaseiland’ (Eastern Island?)...

 

 

Ah, OK...I see!

 

The mystery of Stonehenge would be an example of a real-life mystery. 

 

Mystery novels are fiction that center around a puzzle to solve. Usually the puzzle is some sort of crime. Mumto2 and Amy can surely give you plenty of suggestions :) Agatha Christie would be an example of a mystery writer in English. I read Outsider in Amsterdam by Janwillem van de Wetering last year, and that is considered a mystery.

 

You are all right.  It's whatever you interpret the categories to be and can be fiction or non fiction.  The genres of mystery and crime novels overlap quite a bit so there's going to be crossover with each category bingo.  

 

 

Crime novels will be about solving a crime and can be police procedural, police detective or hard boiled private eye detectives, medical, legal or military thrillers.

 

Mystery novels are solving a mystery but has some parts of crime involved as well.

 

Cozy Mysteries -  what makes a cozy a cozy.

 

 


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#72 Robin M

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 09:22 PM

Finally made some progress here. Under the silver lining category (like Violet Crown's burned fingers), I unexpectedly spent several days at the hospital with close friends as the husband aspirated a medical swish into his lungs and developed chemical pneumonia. (So glad I went and was able to help. He died early yesterday morning - at home.) So, I had some extra time to read.

I'm so sorry, RootAnn.   :grouphug:


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#73 PeacefulChaos

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 12:55 AM

Let's see, I finished Never Let Me Go and really enjoyed it.  

 

At the library this week I picked up Men Without Women by Murakami and I started it last night.  I'm behind on my world travels!  :lol:  jk

I also picked a book up for myself out of the children's section lol... Pink (8.5) is still a little overwhelmed trying to pick books out of all the chapter books, so I go through a shelf each time and help her pick some.  Basically I just pull some out I think she might like and hand them to her to decide on.  Anyway, I was looking through and saw Revolution is not a Dinner Party (at least I think that's what it was called....) and it just caught my attention for some reason.  So I guess I'll read that sometime this week, too.  :D

 

 


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#74 loesje22000

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:22 AM

You are all right. It's whatever you interpret the categories to be and can be fiction or non fiction. The genres of mystery and crime novels overlap quite a bit so there's going to be crossover with each category bingo.


Crime novels will be about solving a crime and can be police procedural, police detective or hard boiled private eye detectives, medical, legal or military thrillers.

Mystery novels are solving a mystery but has some parts of crime involved as well.

Cozy Mysteries - what makes a cozy a cozy.



Thank you!
I will have to look if cozy mystery exists in Dutch.
And otherwise I’ll read something in English :)
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#75 Matryoshka

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 01:33 AM

Thank you!
I will have to look if cozy mystery exists in Dutch.
And otherwise I’ll read something in English :)

 

You've got to have Agatha Christie translated into Dutch?  Anything Miss Marple has got to be cozy... isn't she like the urCozy?

 

In German, they call mysteries "Krimis".


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#76 loesje22000

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 02:02 AM

You've got to have Agatha Christie translated into Dutch? Anything Miss Marple has got to be cozy... isn't she like the urCozy?

In German, they call mysteries "Krimis".


Of course we have Miss Marple in Dutch :) but I use the BINGO less for revisiting old friends then for broadening my horizons and reading new authors... I only visit the library once per month and this is something I can’t find in the catalogue and have to find out in the library itself.

I think Krimi is a German most Dutch people of my age will know: German series like Derrick are always presented with this word; when I was teenager I tried to finish my homework in time on thursdays as that was ‘ Krimi’ night at Dutch television...
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#77 mumto2

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 06:34 AM

Loesje, I have been looking on goodreads trying to find a cozy translated to Dutch beyond Christie. So far I haven't been successful but Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs series appears to have potential. The series appears to be widely translated although I haven't found a Dutch edition yet. Are you able to check online for that author? https://www.goodread...rom_search=true


Also not sure if Librarything would be helpful or not but here is a link in Dutch. I have no idea what it says but I generally find it to be a helpful site. https://dk.libraryth...es&sortchoice=0

Eta.....I found a cozy that has been translated! Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie https://www.goodread...aak-van-venijn. You don't appear to have read it. There is a new one at the end of January.

Edited by mumto2, 18 January 2018 - 06:59 AM.

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#78 loesje22000

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 07:36 AM

Loesje, I have been looking on goodreads trying to find a cozy translated to Dutch beyond Christie. So far I haven't been successful but Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs series appears to have potential. The series appears to be widely translated although I haven't found a Dutch edition yet. Are you able to check online for that author? https://www.goodread...rom_search=true


Also not sure if Librarything would be helpful or not but here is a link in Dutch. I have no idea what it says but I generally find it to be a helpful site. https://dk.libraryth...es&sortchoice=0

Eta.....I found a cozy that has been translated! Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie https://www.goodread...aak-van-venijn. You don't appear to have read it. There is a new one at the end of January.


You are wonderful!

De smaak van venijn is available in my own library, and I can get 2 Jacqueline Winspears in Dutch through IBL! I feel rich when I have choice :)

Just for general information:
Dk is the abbreviation for Denmark, so the librarything site is in Danish.
NL is for Netherlands and therefore in Dutch :)

Off to make some reservations :)
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#79 mumto2

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:03 AM

You are wonderful!

De smaak van venijn is available in my own library, and I can get 2 Jacqueline Winspears in Dutch through IBL! I feel rich when I have choice :)

Just for general information:
Dk is the abbreviation for Denmark, so the librarything site is in Danish.
NL is for Netherlands and therefore in Dutch :)

Off to make some reservations :)


Yeah! Your dd will enjoy Alan Bradley also. She might like Maisie Dobbs but you read them first.

I thought I picked Dutch on librarything. Fat fingers! Lol. Library thing allows sorting that is nice. I used it to sort counties for my Brit trip project.
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#80 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 09:52 AM

 

Looking forward to your reads about Italy and your travels. Always exciting to hear about your travels!   

 

 

I, for one, like hearing about her travels, but I would much prefer being her travel companion. :D  Maybe we should plan a trip with Negin as our guide. 

 

 

While homeschooling huddled upstairs, hiding from the "Ice storm" and sub-freezing temperatures that have immobilized Central Texas, because we none of us apparently can drive over thin patches of gathered sleet, 

Better safe than sorry. I know people make fun of southern states being wimpy about snow, cold, and ice, but we really aren't prepared for it. When the roads get icy we don't have the equipment to deal with it. Many people don't have heaters in their homes or cars. We don't have the proper attire. So weather below freezing temps is serious in these conditions. I don't have any water this morning because my well froze. Luckily, I had cold brew coffee in the fridge that I could just warm in the microwave. No tea this morning. Can't make tea without water. 

 

Anyway, with the highly stressful and scary driving experience I just went through recently in NC on icy/snowy roads that had not yet been salted, I'm not taking the "possible ice on roads" lightly. 

 

Thank you. Robin. You are kind. 

 

Shall we discuss planning a joint trip now? 


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#81 aggieamy

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 11:54 AM

Hello fellow readers!  Long time no see!  I started off last year really going for the bingo challenge but I wimped out half way. .. . I just am not that good at challenges.

 

Anyway, it took me over a year but I finished City of God by Augustine!  Woot!

And I just finished Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell.  An accidental reread (forgot I had read it before!)  But an excellent novel.  I loved it (again.)

Now I've started on Sylvia's Lovers also by Gaskell.

I'm also reading Zero Waste Home by Bea Johnson

And The Odyssey (Lattimore) with my 11th grader.

 

Brand new News Years Resolution for 2018. I'm going to read something by Elizabeth Gaskell. I see her recommended all the time by people who love the same books I do.

 

Jumping in quickly. I'm having a hard time keeping up with my online things I like to do and this thread is one of them. I've only read two books so far and neither is anything to write about. Meh books. 

 

More importantly, I kept forgetting to post that this month is national hot tea month. Well, according to my calendar it is. I have been enjoying Celestial Seasonings Gingerbread Spice, Decaf Chai, and Sugar Plum Spice. I must say I try a lot of different teas and brands and I just find that Celestial Seasonings has almost never let me down. I know I am snubbed by many tea purists but I don't care. 

 

I am currently reading Mort by Pratchett. I'm so happy to all of you here who introduced me to Pratchett. 

 

Yay for Mort. I've got the next Death book downloaded on my phone from audible because I've been told that it's a wonderful book to listen to also.

 

Celestial Seasonings Honey and Vanilla is a current favorite of mine. So good with a bit of extra honey and I can drink it all day long because it's herbal. Otherwise I'd never sleep.

 

 

Haven't read Year One but I also second the recommendation of the MaddAddam trilogy, particularly the first book Oryx and Crake which is that rare beast - a novel that I read as part of book club, having been reluctant to do so and having gotten it out of the library and then felt compelled to buy my own (hard copy!) version of it as I felt it was something that I would reread multiple times.

 

Oryx and Crake was a book club book for me a few years ago too. I enjoyed it but also really appreciate what Erin said about the sexism. If I remember correctly there aren't really any strong realistic women characters ... surprising for such an intelligent woman author. I didn't read any of the other books in the trilogy but my DH and a dear friend of mine did. The second one they liked and the last one they both hated with a passion that is normally reserved for books written by Stephanie Meyer.

 


I’m currently listening to Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science and hoping to finish Ron Chernow’s Grant and The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers this week. For fiction, I have two Discworld books, more October Daye, and the first book in the Xanth series.

 

Have you read any Piers Anthony before? He was one of my favorite authors as a kid. I could fly through one of his books between dinnertime and bedtime when I was in middle school. So many comments ... I will wait until you finish reading it though to discuss because I don't want to say anything to influence your opinion on the book.

 


Shall we discuss planning a joint trip now? 

 

I for one have been pushing for a BaW world cruise for awhile. Can't you just picture us all coming on board with a steamer trunks full of books. And they'd have to restock tea every port. Maybe fly some out on days at sea.


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#82 Robin M

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:06 PM

I, for one, like hearing about her travels, but I would much prefer being her travel companion. :D  Maybe we should plan a trip with Negin as our guide. 

 

Shall we discuss planning a joint trip now? 

 

I for one have been pushing for a BaW world cruise for awhile. Can't you just picture us all coming on board with a steamer trunks full of books. And they'd have to restock tea every port. Maybe fly some out on days at sea.

 

A world cruise sounds absolutely wonderful.   Maybe 2020!  Have to start saving now!  North america waterways or barges and canals of Europe or a sea going adventure?  Wonder how much it would cost to rent a ship and crew to take us on a bookish cruise?  


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#83 Violet Crown

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:45 PM

Better safe than sorry. I know people make fun of southern states being wimpy about snow, cold, and ice, but we really aren't prepared for it. When the roads get icy we don't have the equipment to deal with it. Many people don't have heaters in their homes or cars. We don't have the proper attire. So weather below freezing temps is serious in these conditions. I don't have any water this morning because my well froze. Luckily, I had cold brew coffee in the fridge that I could just warm in the microwave. No tea this morning. Can't make tea without water.

Anyway, with the highly stressful and scary driving experience I just went through recently in NC on icy/snowy roads that had not yet been salted, I'm not taking the "possible ice on roads" lightly.


No, I agree. The busy multi-lane intersection near our house had crushed gravel dumped on the ice and a police SUV parked in the middle so people could only go through slowly and one at a time; that's all the city has got to work with.

Hope your well has thawed. We're without hot water ourselves because our water heater failed and it's impossible to get a plumber because of all the folks with burst pipes.
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#84 Violet Crown

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 08:48 PM

Brand new News Years Resolution for 2018. I'm going to read something by Elizabeth Gaskell. I see her recommended all the time by people who love the same books I do.

Send up a flare when you do. I didn't like North and South that much, but I keep thinking I should give her another chance.
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#85 Mothersweets

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 09:39 PM

Brand new News Years Resolution for 2018. I'm going to read something by Elizabeth Gaskell. I see her recommended all the time by people who love the same books I do.

 

 

 

 

I for one have been pushing for a BaW world cruise for awhile. Can't you just picture us all coming on board with a steamer trunks full of books. And they'd have to restock tea every port. Maybe fly some out on days at sea.

 

 

Yay!! Amy, try Wives and Daughters https://www.goodread...rom_search=true  The miniseries made from it is very well done, too!

 

A cruise with y'all would be fun :)


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#86 melmichigan

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 10:24 PM

I know that many people here also listen to audiobooks, so I thought I'd share that Audible is honoring Katherine Kellgren, who recently lost her battle with cancer.  My kids know her from the Rick Riordan books, and I remember her from multiple books over the years.  She had such a voice, and seemed to be able to tackle any character.  


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#87 Runningmom80

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 10:37 PM

52 in 2018
1. Murder on the Orient Express // Agatha Christie
2. Sing, Unburied, Sing // Jessmyn Ward
3. Braving the Wilderness // Brene Brown
4. Buddhism for Mothers // Sarah Napthali


Currently reading Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen and How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so kids will talk
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#88 loesje22000

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 04:32 AM

I like North & South (Gaskell) the book and the serie.
I even worked myself through the English as the book has not been translated.

I do like Cranford the serie but didn’t care for the book (in translation)

I also liked Wifes and Daughters (the serie) but haven’t found the courage yet to try the book in English (no translation available)

I don’t think her Biography about Charlotte Bronte is the most neutral one :)
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#89 Mom-ninja.

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 08:13 AM

No, I agree. The busy multi-lane intersection near our house had crushed gravel dumped on the ice and a police SUV parked in the middle so people could only go through slowly and one at a time; that's all the city has got to work with.

Hope your well has thawed. We're without hot water ourselves because our water heater failed and it's impossible to get a plumber because of all the folks with burst pipes.

 

Hope you get hot water soon. Our well started working by the afternoon as it warmed. 

 

 

I'm alternating between Mort and Bloodlands; Europe between Hitler and Stalin. I read as much as I can from the gruesome, heartwrenching, depressing Bloodlands and then switch over to Mort to help get back a bit of love and hope for humanity. 


Edited by Mom-ninja., 19 January 2018 - 08:14 AM.

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#90 soror

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 09:32 AM

52 in 2018
1. Murder on the Orient Express // Agatha Christie
2. Sing, Unburied, Sing // Jessmyn Ward
3. Braving the Wilderness // Brene Brown
4. Buddhism for Mothers // Sarah Napthali


Currently reading Miller’s Valley by Anna Quindlen and How to Talk so Kids will Listen and Listen so kids will talk

How did you like Braving the Wilderness? I tried reading some of her other books and had a hard time getting into them, although I generally like that type of book.

 

Finished The Hobbit this morning, it was even lovelier than I remembered.  Now I guess I either have to hit my book on organization or The Codebreakers (non-fic about women code breakers in the war).

 

1-4: Dark is Rising Series

5: Art of Asking 

6: The Hobbit 


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#91 The Accidental Coach

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 10:21 AM

I am so happy I had a light start to the month and read/listened to 4 books. Now that the semester and sports season are in full swing, I haven't had much time to read.

 

I am half way through my second Haruki Murakami book.

 

My Kindle TBR stash was wiped out when my Kindle Unlimited membership stopped on the 13th. I turned it on and was surprised at how quickly all of the books I had downloaded had disappeared. I guess I should have disconnected it from the internet. Maybe they would have stayed around a bit longer.  Oh well, at least I can start fresh with a new TBR list. After all, I do have a number of print books sitting here in my house begging to be read.


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#92 ErinE

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 12:08 PM

Congratulations on your new volunteer position reading for children's hour.  Sounds like loads of fun. Let me know how you enjoy Anthony's first book Spell for Chameleon in the xanth series.  I have quite a few packed away in my closet and happy to pass the next one along if you are interested.

 

Thanks for the generous offer! I've finished the first Xanth book and I'm pretty sure I won't read anymore in the series. 

 

Have you read any Piers Anthony before? He was one of my favorite authors as a kid. I could fly through one of his books between dinnertime and bedtime when I was in middle school. So many comments ... I will wait until you finish reading it though to discuss because I don't want to say anything to influence your opinion on the book.

 

 

 

This was my first Anthony read and most likely my last. I started the book Sunday and ended up setting it aside for several days because the s*xism was too much. Since I can appreciate the hard work that goes into writing a novel, I finished just to give the author a chance. It was a quick easy read, but the terrible opinion of women... there are too many instances to point out here. So I'm done.

 

I originally vowed to read three books in a series from the NPR Top 100 Fantasy and Science Fiction, but I've changed my mind. One book, unless I want to read more.


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#93 Raifta

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 12:30 PM

 

 

 

Oryx and Crake was a book club book for me a few years ago too. I enjoyed it but also really appreciate what Erin said about the sexism. If I remember correctly there aren't really any strong realistic women characters ... surprising for such an intelligent woman author. I didn't read any of the other books in the trilogy but my DH and a dear friend of mine did. The second one they liked and the last one they both hated with a passion that is normally reserved for books written by Stephanie Meyer.

 

 

I for one have been pushing for a BaW world cruise for awhile. Can't you just picture us all coming on board with a steamer trunks full of books. And they'd have to restock tea every port. Maybe fly some out on days at sea.

 

To be honest, I also hated the third book.  But I find that is pretty much the case in every trilogy I have read.

 

Love the idea of a BaW cruise.  I vote for a European version.

 

Thanks for the generous offer! I've finished the first Xanth book and I'm pretty sure I won't read anymore in the series. 

 

 

This was my first Anthony read and most likely my last. I started the book Sunday and ended up setting it aside for several days because the s*xism was too much. Since I can appreciate the hard work that goes into writing a novel, I finished just to give the author a chance. It was a quick easy read, but the terrible opinion of women... there are too many instances to point out here. So I'm done.

 

 

I read the Xanth novels as a young teen and even then was mildly offended but didn't know what else to read.  They are not ones that I'll be suggesting to my kids.  I'm more likely to pick some Anne McCaffrey for them, which are also books I read at that time, and they've already started on some Pratchett, which didn't exist then but had it existed I'm sure they would have been staples of my young teen reading list.


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#94 ErinE

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 01:08 PM

 

I read the Xanth novels as a young teen and even then was mildly offended but didn't know what else to read.  They are not ones that I'll be suggesting to my kids.  I'm more likely to pick some Anne McCaffrey for them, which are also books I read at that time, and they've already started on some Pratchett, which didn't exist then but had it existed I'm sure they would have been staples of my young teen reading list.

 

I read Dragonflight last year and the main character basically says, "Yeah, I r*ped her." I was surprised but recognize that it was a pretty common trope of the time (Beyond Heaving Bosoms, while snarky, does point out this issue in older romances). So I recommend pre-reading. My top 100 list has Dragonflight. This may be one instance where I'll read more than the first book since so many people, well past their teens, like McCaffrey.


Edited by ErinE, 19 January 2018 - 01:27 PM.

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#95 Raifta

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 02:42 PM

I read Dragonflight last year and the main character basically says, "Yeah, I r*ped her." I was surprised but recognize that it was a pretty common trope of the time (Beyond Heaving Bosoms, while snarky, does point out this issue in older romances). So I recommend pre-reading. My top 100 list has Dragonflight. This may be one instance where I'll read more than the first book since so many people, well past their teens, like McCaffrey.

 

Hmm, good to know.  I may have totally glazed over that when reading it originally.

 

I have a vague recollection of reading somewhere recently about some McCaffrey novels that were suitable for younger kids but can't remember where I saw that or which ones they were - oh wait, I think it was specifically the Harper Hall trilogy which does not include Dragonflight.  Will have to look into this more.


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#96 mumto2

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 06:01 PM

Last year I almost missed completing my alphabetical by author challenge because my planned Z book never came off of hold. I found something else but decided to get Z out of the way early this year because I already had a book on hold. Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin https://www.goodread...oung-jane-young is the story of a young woman caught in a political scandal (think Monica) and the aftereffects on her life and those around her for the next several years. Told through the eyes of the women in her (and his) life. It was essentially a beach read but it did make a statement. I probably won't be reading more by this author unless I really need a Z again. It was fine but didn't care for the multiple first person style.

I actually had another Z that I just cancelled my hold on so that I can use it next year! :lol: Authors with last names starting with Z will forever be associated with lengthy hold line's in my mind.

I also finished my audio book Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper. Planning to listen to the rest of the Dark is Rising series over the next couple of months.

Mom Ninja, I am glad your well is working again.

VC, I hope by now you have hot water.

Edited by mumto2, 19 January 2018 - 06:02 PM.

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#97 Zebra

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 07:32 PM

I finally finished Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.   I have been reading it for weeks, maybe months and it had become the bane of my existence  :svengo: .  

 

Spoiler alert, after 700 pages he died in a duel!   

 

Sorry everyone, for ruining the ending.

 

I was never so happy to throw a book into the Goodwill pile, and wish I had a woodstove to burn it in.  It may just be that we are having a very long winter here, and I am going a bit stir-crazy and taking it out on poor Alexander Hamilton.

 

But maybe not.    :laugh:   

 

Alexander Hamilton did make interesting contributions, but it's a little hard to be as memorable or interesting as figures like Ben Franklin or Thomas Jefferson.

 

 


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#98 dsmith

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 08:51 PM

I finished Tips for Living by Renee Shafransky. It was a light read, enjoyable but not something I would re-read.

 

I also finished Starfist: First to Fight by Dan Cragg and David Sherman. This is the first book in a military sci-fi series that I read years ago. I came across it in a search and decided it was time for a re-read. I will probably continue with the series. 

 

I decided to ditch the print version of Jane Eyre and try the Audible version narrated by Susan Ericksen, and I am now enjoying it so much more! I'm glad I didn't give up on it. I have quite a few classic audiobooks that I haven't listened to yet, from when Amazon and Audible were doing the freebies a few years ago. This was one of them, but I see it is no longer available on Audible. The narrator does a great job bringing the characters to life. I should finish it up over the weekend. 

 

I decided to re-listen to the end of Murder on the Orient Express. I usually listen to this late at night and often doze off. I finished it, but I don't really remember much of the last few chapters. I will listen to them during daytime hours this time! 

 

I'm still reading Battle Cry of Freedom and American Pictures. I will probably finish American Pictures this weekend. I've also started a new book, Two Wings of a Nightingale: Persian soul, Islamic heart. On the Road in Iran by travel writer Jill Worrall. Here's a link:

 

https://www.amazon.c...f a nightingale

 

 


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#99 ErinE

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 09:16 PM

I finally finished Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow.   I have been reading it for weeks, maybe months and it had become the bane of my existence  :svengo: .  

 

Spoiler alert, after 700 pages he died in a duel!   

 

Sorry everyone, for ruining the ending.

 

I was never so happy to throw a book into the Goodwill pile, and wish I had a woodstove to burn it in.  It may just be that we are having a very long winter here, and I am going a bit stir-crazy and taking it out on poor Alexander Hamilton.

 

But maybe not.    :laugh:   

 

Alexander Hamilton did make interesting contributions, but it's a little hard to be as memorable or interesting as figures like Ben Franklin or Thomas Jefferson.

 

It might be Chernow. I've read four of his biographies (House of Morgan, Titan, Alexander Hamilton, Grant), and I've noticed Chernow has a tendency to throw in everything plus the kitchen sink. I just finished Grant and having read another Grant biography years ago, I kept wondering if all the detail was really necessary.


Edited by ErinE, 19 January 2018 - 09:17 PM.

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#100 Zebra

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Posted 19 January 2018 - 09:38 PM

It might be Chernow. I've read four of his biographies (House of Morgan, Titan, Alexander Hamilton, Grant), and I've noticed Chernow has a tendency to throw in everything plus the kitchen sink. I just finished Grant and having read another Grant biography years ago, I kept wondering if all the detail was really necessary.


Yes, this exactly.
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