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Gifted Acqusition of Knowledge/Understanding


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#1 Patty Joanna

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 12:49 AM

There is a mode of giftedness wherein one acquires an entire body of knowledge in a unique way—not gathering knowledge but sort of like a bubble of an entire body of knowledge coming to one all at once.

Is there a name for this? I read it on these boards many years ago and I need the terminology now.

Thank you.

#2 pinewarbler

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 01:31 PM

I wonder if you mean a visual-spatial learner? They learn from the big-picture down, not from the details on outwards. That is how my eldest learns... she needs to know the subject from the outside before she can hang the facts in her memory palace :001_smile:. (Oddly enough she does not give others that luxury when she is describing things.)

Yesterday she publicly took a student teacher to task for not even setting up the subject nor context of a lesson and then complaining that the students didn't know when to take notes. She bullied the teacher into posting her lesson plan notes on the google classroom. 

 

Or are you referring to kinesthetic learning?



#3 JHLWTM

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Posted Yesterday, 01:07 AM

I don't know what the proper terminology is, but I have one child I call a linear learner, and one I call a step function learner. The linear one adds knowledge in a step wise and orderly fashion. Linear-learner assimilates knowledge "neatly," it gets filed away into what I imagine is an alphabetized, color coded framework in the brain, ready for rapid retrieval.  The step function learner, well, the mind is all over the place, so when it's learning something new, there is a long latency period where it "seems" like nothing is happening, nothing is going in. But, given enough time, the step-function learner usually surprises me by making a big jump in knowledge or skill. It's like the information was going in all along, but in a disorganized way (like Schtoompa's closet for any Richard Scarry fans), until eventually the brain fully assimilates and organizes it. 



#4 pinewarbler

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Posted Today, 09:10 AM

Love Schtoompa! Have you read Crabtree by Jon Nichols?