Jump to content


What's with the ads?

Photo
- - - - -

Those of you who deal with nerve issues - is there anything that works?


58 replies to this topic

What's with the ads?

#51 Sue in St Pete

Sue in St Pete

    Amateur Bee Keeper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5551 posts

Posted 15 November 2017 - 10:52 PM

Ok, I looked up the Tens Unit and this link.  The Tens Unit looks interesting.  I wish there were a way to try it first to see if it worked before actually buying one.

 

Some massage therapists, chiropractors, and cranial sacral (sp?) folks have Tens Units.  Can't really remember the chain of events that led me to the person who used it on me, but likely it started in an alternative health "newspaper" from a local health food store.

 

ETA:  Maybe I'm thinking microcurrent - not sure that's the same as Tens Unit.
 


Edited by Sue in St Pete, 16 November 2017 - 06:49 AM.

  • creekland and Sandwalker like this

#52 creekland

creekland

    Retired homeschooler!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23911 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 07:23 AM

My husband was suffering similar pain a couple years ago. He finally found relief with physical therapy. They tried several different things before finding exercises which help. Now as long as he maintains his exercises, he is doing well. We were shocked that physical therapy helped.

 

For trigeminal nerve pain (upper jaw to ear)?  If so, I can start looking those ideas up online.  I've done PT before for radial/carpal nerve pain (didn't help, but worth a try), but have no idea if it could be something for head stuff - hence the question.  (If I get extra time later this morning, then I can just google it myself to check if you're not back on here.  For the moment I'm just catching up on the Hive waiting for hubby to get up to start our day - sort of my "me" time.)

 

Check for any things that could be causing inflammation and treat those?

 

FWIW, my mom's back pain (major scoliosis, burst disc, treated with major pain pills multiple times per day) went down to no pain pills daily after she got her two miniscule breast cancer sites removed. And my repetitive stress injury caused by a compressed nerve flares up MAJORLY after my flu shot because of the inflammation. 

 

So anything that treats inflammation might offer some level of relief. 

 

:grouphug:  :grouphug:

 

That's pretty impressive.  I'd have never guessed those two things could be linked at all.  I have to admit I'm not really sure what else treats inflammation (for us minions) besides ibuprofen.  I've tried turmeric in the past, but that didn't seem to do anything.  Upping salt combined with lowering fluid sure seems to help my other issues, but doesn't touch this one (for better or worse).  I'm actually at a pretty low fluid point now (not dehydrated low) as my body is thirsty (rarely happens), but the other issues feel quite a bit better so it's tough to want to actually drink anything.  I made my morning tea anyway.  I don't really want to kill my kidneys.  It's just nice to have a little bit of a break first.

 

I made a mental note while in Jordan that folks there don't consume nearly as much liquid as we do in the US - even the Bedouin (perhaps esp the Bedouin).  And it tends toward hot... plus is in the desert... so my mind has entertained the thought wondering if we really need as much fluid as we're told.  What I don't know is if they have more kidney issues (or similar) later in life.  They smoke far more than we do too and I suspect that doesn't have terrific results later on either.

 

Some massage therapists, chiropractors, and cranial sacral (sp?) folks have Tens Units.  Can't really remember the chain of events that led me to the person who used it on me, but likely it started in an alternative health "newspaper" from a local health food store.

 

ETA:  Maybe I'm thinking microcurrent - not sure that's the same as Tens Unit.

 

I'm going to make a quick guess that going out and "accidentally" putting my face up against the electrified portion of our pony fence probably isn't the same either.   :lol:

 

(But thanks for the thought.  I'd definitely want to try that one first seeing the cost of buying a unit.  I just couldn't resist typing what my brain continued on with after reading your ETA. ;)  )



#53 MBM

MBM

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3593 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 09:46 AM

For trigeminal nerve pain, the SOTA pemf device could help. The device discharges a magnetic field through tissue which causes changes in the ions and electrolytes in cells. That then leads to a chain of chemical events within cells. When the cells change, tissue and organs eventually change, too. Pemf therapy doesn’t heal problems directly but optimizes cellular metabolism so the body can heal itself.

The SOTA is one of the least expensive devices — about $350. I use mine every day to keep my bones healthy. I have two other devices as well. I get all of mine from Dr. Pawluk’s website. He is an MD who has studied pemf extensively and uses it in his practice. Some chiropractors have them for clients as well.

You don’t need to worry about the electrical magnetic frequencies (EMFs) because almost all devices fall into the extremely low frequency (ELF) or very low frequency range (VLF).

NASA uses them to keep astronauts healthy while in space. Other areas of medicine use them, too, for many health problems. They can also lead to changes that increase telomeres.

Another idea for you is to check your omega-3 index. It’s a simple test you can do in your home. Omega Quant is a pretty good one to use initially because they provide more information and advice than most. Amazon sells it.
  • creekland likes this

#54 Hypatia.

Hypatia.

    Raising chaos

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1082 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 01:19 PM

Gabapentin and Lyrica weren't much help for my nerve pain, Tegretol (carbamazepine) was a little more helpful. Nerve blocks helped give temporary relief, and then we moved on to radiofrequency ablations. I've had ablations of my occipital nerves and right supraorbital nerve. It lasts for several months (about 10 months last time I had it done), I'm due to have the occipital nerves zapped again.


  • creekland likes this

#55 SanDiegoMom in VA

SanDiegoMom in VA

    Hive Mind Level 6 Worker: Scout Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 529 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 02:57 PM

Just weighing in with one tiny tidbit -- I don't know how often you are dehydrated, but my daughters both had to go to the doctor for fainting. They both were constantly dehydrated and then they would stand up and faint.  If they didn't faint, their pulse would race to keep their blood pressure elevated enough so as not to faint.  So my daughter's resting pulse was normal but it shot up when she stood up, much higher than would be normal. Anyway, just another data point. 


  • creekland likes this

#56 creekland

creekland

    Retired homeschooler!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23911 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 04:07 PM

Gabapentin and Lyrica weren't much help for my nerve pain, Tegretol (carbamazepine) was a little more helpful. Nerve blocks helped give temporary relief, and then we moved on to radiofrequency ablations. I've had ablations of my occipital nerves and right supraorbital nerve. It lasts for several months (about 10 months last time I had it done), I'm due to have the occipital nerves zapped again.

 

Who does this?  A doctor?  If so, which specialty?  If not, then who?

 

Just weighing in with one tiny tidbit -- I don't know how often you are dehydrated, but my daughters both had to go to the doctor for fainting. They both were constantly dehydrated and then they would stand up and faint.  If they didn't faint, their pulse would race to keep their blood pressure elevated enough so as not to faint.  So my daughter's resting pulse was normal but it shot up when she stood up, much higher than would be normal. Anyway, just another data point. 

 

Never.  I never let the fluid intake drop that low.  I just keep it a quart low if talking about motor engine terms.  It feels "right" at that level for my body.  Higher is definitely wrong.  There's absolutely no feeling of being faint at all.  Pulse only increases with activity (not standing) and I 99% expect that's due to the lung issues as it matches those with a strong correlation line.

 

Having been outside more doing chores and everyday "life" on the farm, the lung issue is the higher priority for sure.  I can sit here and be annoyed at the ear and jaw pain, but those don't affect life except for being annoying - and the more it's happening (like on today's very windy day) - the more my body/brain is adjusting to that being normal. That's probably what happened last winter, so the first cold day just brought on a WTH moment.  Now my brain is a bit more resigned to "that's life."

 

Having to pause doing regular chores does affect everyday life.  :glare:



#57 Hypatia.

Hypatia.

    Raising chaos

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1082 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 08:48 PM

Who does this?  A doctor?  If so, which specialty?  If not, then who?

 

 

My initial nerve blocks (for the occipital nerves, pretty simple) were done by my neurologist that I see for my migraines and occipital neuralgia. After getting those for a year or so he referred me to a pain clinic, one of the doctors there did my radiofrequency ablation. The supraorbital nerve was a little different, I researched (yeah, I know, Dr. Google) and requested a nerve block for that nerve at my next pain clinic appointment. The doctor had never done one before but was geekily excited to try it. It gave me relief, and he suggested that we try an RFA on that nerve, again something else he had never done but was confident he could do.


  • creekland likes this

#58 abacus2

abacus2

    Hive Mind Queen Bee

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1756 posts

Posted 16 November 2017 - 11:21 PM

Yes, trigeminal pain, his symptoms started with what he thought was a bad tooth. After two root canals, the endontist told him he need a neurologist. The neurologist tried several things, gabapentin was helpful. After we realized he was also having symptoms like mine (two bad disks in my neck), we asked about an MRI. When the MRI showed issues in his neck, the neurologist prescribed physical therapy. With PT, he no longer needs medicine or to see the neurologist.


  • creekland likes this

#59 creekland

creekland

    Retired homeschooler!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23911 posts

Posted 17 November 2017 - 06:09 AM

My initial nerve blocks (for the occipital nerves, pretty simple) were done by my neurologist that I see for my migraines and occipital neuralgia. After getting those for a year or so he referred me to a pain clinic, one of the doctors there did my radiofrequency ablation. The supraorbital nerve was a little different, I researched (yeah, I know, Dr. Google) and requested a nerve block for that nerve at my next pain clinic appointment. The doctor had never done one before but was geekily excited to try it. It gave me relief, and he suggested that we try an RFA on that nerve, again something else he had never done but was confident he could do.

 

Thanks for the info.  This is more than I need right now, but it's really nice knowing there are options that work should it get worse in the future.

 

Yes, trigeminal pain, his symptoms started with what he thought was a bad tooth. After two root canals, the endontist told him he need a neurologist. The neurologist tried several things, gabapentin was helpful. After we realized he was also having symptoms like mine (two bad disks in my neck), we asked about an MRI. When the MRI showed issues in his neck, the neurologist prescribed physical therapy. With PT, he no longer needs medicine or to see the neurologist.

 

Ok, that makes sense with PT.  My "usual" MRIs don't show problems with disks in the neck.  I fully get the root canals though.  This nerve definitely affects the teeth and one could easily assume that's where the problem lies.  Ditto with the ear - which is why I've been to an ENT twice - and my last instructions from the primary care dr were to "try another one."  Uh, no.  The ear is fine.  I believe the ENTs when they tell me it's not an ear problem.  Even the anatomy teacher at my school could tell me it wasn't an ear problem considering there are no tumors or cysts, balance, or hearing problems.